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Poor Geometry

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by wilby, Jul 10, 2002.

  1. wilby

    wilby
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    NOW THEN

    I've been reading the forum avidly as I am looking into purchasing a new TV and have read sooo many stories of TV with either geometry woes or just general naff quality

    Can anyone tell me (apart from cost) why manufacturers don't fit the same buttons (10 options to just about change any setting) on a TV as they do on a PC Monitor?

    Cheers
     
  2. Zacabeb

    Zacabeb
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    TV's are harder to calibrate than a PC monitor, because geometry settings you make on the monitor will retain its effect. Monitors are built better and the smaller screen size coupled with lower contrast, make them more stable than TV's. TV's are also built with tricks to make them cheaper to manufacture, including optocouplers and other unreliable designs.

    In CRT PC monitors those settings are there only because they have to be, given the monitors have to support a variety of resolutions and scan rates.

    The settings are there in the TV's, but they are hidden away in the service menus (aside from the occasional trim pot inside the set) It is easier to wreck the geometry on a TV and since the deflection is unreliable, it requires a bit more caution when setting it up. It would be risky to permit uninformed users control over TV geometry - even engineers have difficulty setting it up.

    A big problem is that many sets are calibrated to give somewhat decent geometry at factory settings, which includes the infamous 95% contrast 'torch mode'. When you turn down the contrast to a watchable level, the compensation for blooming that was added in the factory when geometry was set up, is no longer proportional.

    Ironically, when setting up geometry for torch mode, they are essentially throwing darts as the image is pretty much shapeless in torch mode. Hence the randomness and severity of geometry problems.
     

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