Point & Shoot or DSLR camera for youtube videos

Respected1989

Standard Member
Hi Everyone,

I'm a complete novice when it comes to cameras so please bare with me. :confused:

I'm looking to create short (10 minute) videos for youtube so I'm in the market to buy my first camera. My budget is around £250 - £300.

I was originally thinking of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ40EB-K Compact Camera but I'm now also considering buying one of these DSLR's;
- Canon EOS 1100D Digital SLR Camera (With 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6 DC III Lens Kit)
- Panasonic DMC-FZ72EB-K Lumix Camera
- Nikon D3100 Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm VR Lens Kit (14.2MP)

What do you guys think? Would the P&S Lumix DMC-TZ40 be good enough or should I go with one of the entry level DSLRs?

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Cheers

Tom :)
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
Why are you also not considering a proper camcorder? For example the Panasonic HC-V210 at £199. If you are serious about video then a camcorder is much more versatile than a DSLR.
 

chrishull3

Well-known Member
Hi Everyone,

I'm a complete novice when it comes to cameras so please bare with me. :confused:

I'm looking to create short (10 minute) videos for youtube so I'm in the market to buy my first camera. My budget is around £250 - £300.

I was originally thinking of the Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ40EB-K Compact Camera but I'm now also considering buying one of these DSLR's;
- Canon EOS 1100D Digital SLR Camera (With 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6 DC III Lens Kit)
- Panasonic DMC-FZ72EB-K Lumix Camera
- Nikon D3100 Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm VR Lens Kit (14.2MP)

What do you guys think? Would the P&S Lumix DMC-TZ40 be good enough or should I go with one of the entry level DSLRs?

Any advice would be much appreciated.

Cheers

Tom :)

Filming with a camera is more hard work than with a camcorder,for you tube a camcorder may well be the preferred option.
But i love the video i get from little stills camera Canon EOS M hands-on preview: Digital Photography Review
Wich is a minature DSLR with a full size sensor,i use it more than mmy camcorders now because IMO the video is better and the stills are great too,but if you are new to videography a camcorder may be the answer for you.
 

Respected1989

Standard Member
Why are you also not considering a proper camcorder? For example the Panasonic HC-V210 at £199. If you are serious about video then a camcorder is much more versatile than a DSLR.
Filming with a camera is more hard work than with a camcorder,for you tube a camcorder may well be the preferred option.
But i love the video i get from little stills camera Canon EOS M hands-on preview: Digital Photography Review
Wich is a minature DSLR with a full size sensor,i use it more than mmy camcorders now because IMO the video is better and the stills are great too,but if you are new to videography a camcorder may be the answer for you.
That's a good point. Personally I would like to have the functionality to take decent quality photos as-well. But another reason why I didn't consider a camcorder is because I was told that it would be much more expensive to get the same quality video on a DSLR (like the canon T3i) from a camcorder. Is this true?

I only plan to make short videos. After some research, I would more than likely get the more expensive canon D600 over the cheaper D1100 but I'm now also considering the the compact Canon MILC or even Panasonic camcorder :confused:

Thanks for the prompt replies
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
Both my camcorders take excellent still photos, so much so that I leave my Olympus at home and rely on the one camera. I have enlarged to A3 from a camcorder photo.
 

chrishull3

Well-known Member
That's a good point. Personally I would like to have the functionality to take decent quality photos as-well. But another reason why I didn't consider a camcorder is because I was told that it would be much more expensive to get the same quality video on a DSLR (like the canon T3i) from a camcorder. Is this true?

I only plan to make short videos. After some research, I would more than likely get the more expensive canon D600 over the cheaper D1100 but I'm now also considering the the compact Canon MILC or even Panasonic camcorder :confused:

Thanks for the prompt replies
As a user of Camcorders and DSLR type cameras for me the cameras take better video and stills and yes imo a camcorder costing a lot more would be needed to take better,but as i said for general on the go filming video camcorders are less hassle
 

Chelters

Active Member
You didn't really say what you will be recording.
If it's you talking to camera then what ever you do get a device with a flipable screen.
That is one where you can see the screen from in front of the camera, it will make things sooooooo much easier for you.

Camcorder or camera, well camcorders are ready to go when you press the button, have superb auto focus and stabilisation compared to DSLR types. DSLRs are fine if you have time to set everything up and can give a good image. Low light work is possible with both, most camcorders have a wide (low F number) aperture and the smaller sensor is not that much of a disadvantage. To get that low F number with a DSLR you'll have to pay as much again for a lens.

It is very much a case of swings and roundabouts, both types have their uses.
So what do you intend to film?
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
Don't forget about audio as well. DSLRs all benefit from an external audio recorder, as they only have basic capabilities. The 1100D has now been superseded by the 1200D, which adds 1080p recording as well. It would not be my first choice, as it does not have an external mic input or flip out screen.

I have a brace of 700ds and also a Panasonic AG AC90 and V950. For Youtube the 950 would be my camera of choice, as it is small, quick to deploy, with good stabilisation and usable audio straight out of the box.
 

chrishull3

Well-known Member
As the op says he is a novice a camcorder is advisable,regarding sound though DSLRS or even EOSMs can record good sound without an external audio recorder
just recorded the sound of marsh frogs and bird sound mingling at this spot.The focus etc were not set.
 

Respected1989

Standard Member
You didn't really say what you will be recording.
If it's you talking to camera then what ever you do get a device with a flipable screen.
That is one where you can see the screen from in front of the camera, it will make things sooooooo much easier for you.

Camcorder or camera, well camcorders are ready to go when you press the button, have superb auto focus and stabilisation compared to DSLR types. DSLRs are fine if you have time to set everything up and can give a good image. Low light work is possible with both, most camcorders have a wide (low F number) aperture and the smaller sensor is not that much of a disadvantage. To get that low F number with a DSLR you'll have to pay as much again for a lens.

It is very much a case of swings and roundabouts, both types have their uses.
So what do you intend to film?

Don't forget about audio as well. DSLRs all benefit from an external audio recorder, as they only have basic capabilities. The 1100D has now been superseded by the 1200D, which adds 1080p recording as well. It would not be my first choice, as it does not have an external mic input or flip out screen.

I have a brace of 700ds and also a Panasonic AG AC90 and V950. For Youtube the 950 would be my camera of choice, as it is small, quick to deploy, with good stabilisation and usable audio straight out of the box.
I'm manly going to be doing product reviews and interviews. Almost all filming will be done indoors where I can control the lighting. In this case I wonder whether the wider aperture of a camcorder is critical for me?

I think it's important to remember that I'm just starting off and will probably invest in better equipment at a latter date. I'm almost set on the Canon EOS M compact after seeing it's amazing video and photo quality on youtube. My main concern now is that it doesn't have a flip screen.

As for audio I plan to use my condenser Blue yeti mic, which would be hooked up to my macbook and then sync the audio with the video using final cut pro. I'm not sure whether this is going to be alot of hassle! The other simpler option could be to use a lapel mic with the cannon EOS M. Could anyone recommend me a decent one?

I do appreciate the comments guys. very helpful.

P.s. After looking into this more, it seems to be a better idea to stretch my budget and go for the Canon 600D so that I can have the flip display. I know everyone has said that a DSLR's are more complicated than using a camcorders but I'm don't mind a challenge!
 
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Terfyn

Well-known Member
Have you also considered the Wi-Fi capability of most new camcorders. You will have not only a flip screen that camcorders have but remote control over framing using the zoom and on/off control of the filming. Microphone input is standard on the higher end camcorders so there would be no need for lip sync.
DSLRs are still a compromise that is why people go for a camcorder and a DSLR or bridge camera.
 

chrishull3

Well-known Member
I'm manly going to be doing product reviews and interviews. Almost all filming will be done indoors where I can control the lighting. In this case I wonder whether the wider aperture of a camcorder is critical for me?

I think it's important to remember that I'm just starting off and will probably invest in better equipment at a latter date. I'm almost set on the Canon EOS M compact after seeing it's amazing video and photo quality on youtube. My main concern now is that it doesn't have a flip screen.

As for audio I plan to use my condenser Blue yeti mic, which would be hooked up to my macbook and then sync the audio with the video using final cut pro. I'm not sure whether this is going to be alot of hassle! The other simpler option could be to use a lapel mic with the cannon EOS M. Could anyone recommend me a decent one?

I do appreciate the comments guys. very helpful.

P.s. After looking into this more, it seems to be a better idea to stretch my budget and go for the Canon 600D so that I can have the flip display. I know everyone has said that a DSLR's are more complicated than using a camcorders but I'm don't mind a challenge!
If price is not a problem the 600D is better,i am hoping for a 4K addition in the future.:rolleyes:
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
Syncing audio is quite easy. Manually, use a clap or clappaboard at the start of each shot, or invest $200 in Pluraleyes, which will do it automatically, creating proxy files, new sequences or simply the original video file with the synced audio. This is precisely what I do with my 700s

Camcorders generally have a greater depth of field, which works well in a greater range of scenarios, particularly if you are moving an object around. My 700ds can be very fussy about focus, with the AF being quite poor at times, so I tend to use a magnified 10" screen to set the focus at the start of each shot. On the Camcorders, it is much more point and shoot!
 

Respected1989

Standard Member
Have you also considered the Wi-Fi capability of most new camcorders. You will have not only a flip screen that camcorders have but remote control over framing using the zoom and on/off control of the filming. Microphone input is standard on the higher end camcorders so there would be no need for lip sync.
DSLRs are still a compromise that is why people go for a camcorder and a DSLR or bridge camera.
Syncing audio is quite easy. Manually, use a clap or clappaboard at the start of each shot, or invest $200 in Pluraleyes, which will do it automatically, creating proxy files, new sequences or simply the original video file with the synced audio. This is precisely what I do with my 700s

Camcorders generally have a greater depth of field, which works well in a greater range of scenarios, particularly if you are moving an object around. My 700ds can be very fussy about focus, with the AF being quite poor at times, so I tend to use a magnified 10" screen to set the focus at the start of each shot. On the Camcorders, it is much more point and shoot!
It may seem that I'm anti-camcorders, which is not my intention. Am I right to say that the canon 600D (T3i) will take better quality stills and videos than the Panasonic HC-V250EB-K camcorder?

Just realised that I could connect my Blue yeti mic directly to the camera via 3.5 mm jack, and use the USB to power the mic via my macbook. So audio sync shouldn't be a problem but thanks for the suggestion. Terfyn, you're right, remote control would make life a little easier.
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
I think you will find it is not just about absolute image quality, but usability. The 600D does produce stunning video, but is cumbersome to use and set up and the limited DoF makes some types of shooting a chore. If you can stretch to a 700D, this comes with a much better stock lens - the STM type, which is better suited to video. I have seen 600D kits advertised with this lens as well, so see what you can find.

Forget about a DSLR if you are intending to use it hand held. It is not easy to hold and use without a frame, and then it gets big and heavy.

The main issue is DoF and focus. A camcorder will cope with rapidly changing distances much better than a DSLR, resulting in more usable shots. Quality wise, by the time it hits YouTube, the differences will be minimal.

Plugging the mic into the camera will work, but the auto level control can lead to unexpected level changes, while the audio is a little hissy for my liking. Your Mac would be a better proposition for audio.
 

rogs

Well-known Member
Plugging the mic into the camera will work, but the auto level control can lead to unexpected level changes, while the audio is a little hissy for my liking. Your Mac would be a better proposition for audio.
Many PC laptop mic inputs aren't that good 'hiss wise' either --don't know about how well a Mac performs on that front?

I'm in the 'recording the audio separately' camp - as you have already mentioned.
That approach gives the most options. You're not 'tied' to anything (either metaphorically or literally! :)).

You can mix the camera audio with the remote audio - if you want or need to. The sync issue is really not that difficult.. even without Plural Eyes... especially if you use 'clapperboard' references, as you have already suggested.

Doesn't need to be expensive to get quite good results either....

A tie clip mic like this: Speedlink Spes Clip-On Microphone: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories
connected to a SD card recorder like this: Sony ICDPX333.CE7 4GB PX Series MP3 Digital Voice IC Recorder: Amazon.co.uk: Office Products
will only set you back about £40.
A sample of audio recorded with those two items will sounds like this : http://www.jp137.com/las/Sonysample.MP3

Although that's a mono recording, the recorder is a stereo device (even though Sony only market the mono mic feature?). Where that can be useful is with interview type audio. Two tie clip mics - one for each participant - connected via a cheap splitter cable - can give you two separate (and separately editable) audio tracks, already perfectly in sync with each other!
You can spend more of course.... but some of these cheaper recorders are really very good these days... often better than camcorder mic inputs.
 

chrishull3

Well-known Member
Syncing audio is quite easy. Manually, use a clap or clappaboard at the start of each shot, or invest $200 in Pluraleyes, which will do it automatically, creating proxy files, new sequences or simply the original video file with the synced audio. This is precisely what I do with my 700s

Camcorders generally have a greater depth of field, which works well in a greater range of scenarios, particularly if you are moving an object around. My 700ds can be very fussy about focus, with the AF being quite poor at times, so I tend to use a magnified 10" screen to set the focus at the start of each shot. On the Camcorders, it is much more point and shoot!
Camcorders greater depth of field not so its the other way around
 

Respected1989

Standard Member
I think you will find it is not just about absolute image quality, but usability. The 600D does produce stunning video, but is cumbersome to use and set up and the limited DoF makes some types of shooting a chore. If you can stretch to a 700D, this comes with a much better stock lens - the STM type, which is better suited to video. I have seen 600D kits advertised with this lens as well, so see what you can find.

Forget about a DSLR if you are intending to use it hand held. It is not easy to hold and use without a frame, and then it gets big and heavy.

The main issue is DoF and focus. A camcorder will cope with rapidly changing distances much better than a DSLR, resulting in more usable shots. Quality wise, by the time it hits YouTube, the differences will be minimal.

Plugging the mic into the camera will work, but the auto level control can lead to unexpected level changes, while the audio is a little hissy for my liking. Your Mac would be a better proposition for audio.
Many PC laptop mic inputs aren't that good 'hiss wise' either --don't know about how well a Mac performs on that front?

I'm in the 'recording the audio separately' camp - as you have already mentioned.
That approach gives the most options. You're not 'tied' to anything (either metaphorically or literally! :)).

You can mix the camera audio with the remote audio - if you want or need to. The sync issue is really not that difficult.. even without Plural Eyes... especially if you use 'clapperboard' references, as you have already suggested.

Doesn't need to be expensive to get quite good results either....

A tie clip mic like this: Speedlink Spes Clip-On Microphone: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories
connected to a SD card recorder like this: Sony ICDPX333.CE7 4GB PX Series MP3 Digital Voice IC Recorder: Amazon.co.uk: Office Products
will only set you back about £40.
A sample of audio recorded with those two items will sounds like this : http://www.jp137.com/las/Sonysample.MP3

Although that's a mono recording, the recorder is a stereo device (even though Sony only market the mono mic feature?). Where that can be useful is with interview type audio. Two tie clip mics - one for each participant - connected via a cheap splitter cable - can give you two separate (and separately editable) audio tracks, already perfectly in sync with each other!
You can spend more of course.... but some of these cheaper recorders are really very good these days... often better than camcorder mic inputs.
I've just watched an excellent youtube video (part1 & 2) which basically concurs with what noiseboy72 is saying. In my case, I will not be using it to do home videos and mainly using it to record still subjects (as in an interview). Thus, having a device like a camcorder which can change focus rapidly and smoothly is not a concern. Also, the camera will be mount on a tripod at all times.

I do want the facility to take great quality still images. This is why I'm sold on the T3i. Unfortunately, I can't afford the newer model but I will see if I can get the lens kit that was suggested.

I would imagine that if DSLR's improved their auto focusing capabilities, maybe camcorders would become obsolete. Obvious the design of the DSLR would need to be modified to make it more stable when handheld recording. In terms of quality difference between DSLR's and camcorder, have a look at the beginning of this video
As for the audio, I'll try both ways of recording. But looking at this video; the audio seems pretty good with the mic connected directly to the camera.
 

rogs

Well-known Member
I'm sure the Blue Yeti is a fine mic, but the guy in that last tutorial still has it too far away from his voice. Although better than the camcorder mic, the Blue Yeti audio still has some of the rather amateur sounding room 'boominess' that comes from the natural reverberation of an undamped room.
Both of the two previous You tube clips you linked to had audio that is clearly more close miked. No 'room boom'.
My sample recording in post #16 (this one: http://www.jp137.com/las/Sonysample.MP3) doesn't have any of that 'room boom'. Again, you can tell it was close miked. Obviously, I don't have a very good 'voice-over' type voice (sorry about that!) but I think it does show that you can get pretty good audio for not much money. But unless you're going to record in a 'dead' room acoustic (can be expensive to set up professionally -- cheaper but messy with blankets !) then you need to get your mics as close as you can to the sound source (preferably handheld or tie-clip). If you're going to use a mic like a Blue Yeti, then it too needs to be 'close' - so it probably needs a pop filter added.
That approach lets you keep the system 'gain' down (recording level lower), and the room echo ('room boom') out of your recordings..
 

Respected1989

Standard Member
I think you will find it is not just about absolute image quality, but usability. The 600D does produce stunning video, but is cumbersome to use and set up and the limited DoF makes some types of shooting a chore. If you can stretch to a 700D, this comes with a much better stock lens - the STM type, which is better suited to video. I have seen 600D kits advertised with this lens as well, so see what you can find.

Forget about a DSLR if you are intending to use it hand held. It is not easy to hold and use without a frame, and then it gets big and heavy.

The main issue is DoF and focus. A camcorder will cope with rapidly changing distances much better than a DSLR, resulting in more usable shots. Quality wise, by the time it hits YouTube, the differences will be minimal.

Plugging the mic into the camera will work, but the auto level control can lead to unexpected level changes, while the audio is a little hissy for my liking. Your Mac would be a better proposition for audio.
Just found out that the autofocusing feature does not work with the STM lens on the 600D. I'll have to get the 700D to really benefit from the lens. Unfortunately that's out of my price range so I'm gonna stick with the 600D and the original lens.
 

12harry

Well-known Member
No-one has spotted that Respected1989 posted "...10min vids on YouTube" (or similar).
I think he needs to learn composition (as does that clip 3rd time..." - Just look at the clutter!). 10mins is far too long IMHO, as you are likely to introduce lots of gaps and moments when the audience will wonder, why can't I see the Product.
He will need to learn lighting, and as others have suggested a cheap tie-clip mic and extension cable should do wonders. As others have suggested a camcorder is far easier to use . . . one that has Mic-input and headphone op is ideal. A fully swivelling LCD is also very useful, but don't use it during filming! You'd be surprised that the viewer can spot eyes off-camera and that makes you look Shifty!

If he intends to Film, Write, Edit, light, and Audio these single-handed....that will be a tall order.
Far better to join a film-making club and get to see DSLR's and camcorders in action, then learn a basic Editor - pref one that allows posting to YT. ( most do, if you have an account).

Manual focus a is also a very useful option feature as "Auto" can be a nuisance as the view changes.
Hope that's some help.
 

chrishull3

Well-known Member
Just found out that the autofocusing feature does not work with the STM lens on the 600D. I'll have to get the 700D to really benefit from the lens. Unfortunately that's out of my price range so I'm gonna stick with the 600D and the original lens.
Thats strange i thought STM lenses worked on all Canon SLRs,my STM lenses work perfectly even on my EOS M with the adaptor fitted,AF is good with lenses and manualy focusing is also an easy option,i would double check that STM compatability issue.Regarding 600Ds/700Ds without doubt the 700 is the better camera shame its out of your price range.
 

Respected1989

Standard Member
No-one has spotted that Respected1989 posted "...10min vids on YouTube" (or similar).
I think he needs to learn composition (as does that clip 3rd time..." - Just look at the clutter!). 10mins is far too long IMHO, as you are likely to introduce lots of gaps and moments when the audience will wonder, why can't I see the Product.
He will need to learn lighting, and as others have suggested a cheap tie-clip mic and extension cable should do wonders. As others have suggested a camcorder is far easier to use . . . one that has Mic-input and headphone op is ideal. A fully swivelling LCD is also very useful, but don't use it during filming! You'd be surprised that the viewer can spot eyes off-camera and that makes you look Shifty!

If he intends to Film, Write, Edit, light, and Audio these single-handed....that will be a tall order.
Far better to join a film-making club and get to see DSLR's and camcorders in action, then learn a basic Editor - pref one that allows posting to YT. ( most do, if you have an account).

Manual focus a is also a very useful option feature as "Auto" can be a nuisance as the view changes.
Hope that's some help.
Thanks for the suggestions. I'm in no rush and have plenty of patience so I'm not put off by the work load. Although joining a film making club sounds like a good idea!
 

Respected1989

Standard Member
Thats strange i thought STM lenses worked on all Canon SLRs,my STM lenses work perfectly even on my EOS M with the adaptor fitted,AF is good with lenses and manualy focusing is also an easy option,i would double check that STM compatability issue.Regarding 600Ds/700Ds without doubt the 700 is the better camera shame its out of your price range.
I could be wrong but I've heard from more than two owners that even though the lens will fit into the T3i, the AF doesn't work. Have you tried the STM lens AF on the 600D? After sleeping on it, I've decided to extend my budget again and go for the T5i. My other half is not going to be happy! :p

I was going to buy it from ebay (UK seller with good feedback) which is only £460 but I'm a bit concerned about the price difference to the likes of Amazon. So although more expensive, I think I'll fork out the £525 on amazon for piece of mind. To my knowledge, the usual RRP is £600.
 
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