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plugging guitar into amp?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by joseph, Dec 1, 2002.

  1. joseph

    joseph
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    hi ...i kept my rickenbacker 330 from years ago and sold the amp. i would like to plug my electric guitar into my denon avca1d amp and kef thx speakers to keep the number of boxes down.i was thinking about buying a multi effects pedal and some how try to plug that in to the amp ? in the manual for the effects pedal it says it can be plugged into a power amp ? would that work by plugging it into the left and right of the 5 channel input?
     
  2. stormchaser

    stormchaser
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    hi mate
    does your denon have a phono ie record player ?if so use the record player in sockets on a y lead 2 phonos to a std jack for your guitar
     
  3. stormchaser

    stormchaser
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    ps the other inputs are all the wrong voltage only the record player is correct
     
  4. sinister_stu

    sinister_stu
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    I would advise buying a separate guitar amplifier. Even with a decent multi-effects unit it will still sound terrible plugged into a hifi/home cinema amp
     
  5. dfield2000

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    I've got a tachomine semi acoustic and a fender strat which I plug into an Korg effects unit and then into my home cinema amp - and they sound absolutely beautiful ! You can use the reverb effects of the amp (stadium mode etc) instead of the delay on effects unit to get good results. The sony amp gives a nice warm feel to the sound of a strat, but I suppose it would sound bloody awful if you tried to pump a distortion effect through it. I would recommend using a limiter to avoid overloading the amp/speakers.

    On the back of the effects unit are two outputs, left(mono) and right. I use a lead which has two rca phonos at one end which goes into the amp, and two of the smaller type connections at the other end. They are the type of size that you would plug a set of headphones into a walkman. These smaller connections go into two adaptors which have got the bigger jack sizes which then go into the effects unit.

    Not sure if I've explained that properly, but you get what I mean, yes ?
     
  6. joseph

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    Thanks for the replys , but why would a guitar plugged into a £2000 amp and £2500 speakers sound terrible? surely it would be the same as putting a cd of guitar music on the system?better than a cheap guitar amp with a £50 celestian speaker (marshall) ?
     
  7. dfield2000

    dfield2000
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    I think it depends on what type of sound you want to get from your guitar. A few tracks on 'The Who at the Albert Hall' have got some acoustic stuff by Pete Townsend, and the DTS soundtrack make it almost sound as if he's in the room - but when I plug my acoustic in the sound is obviously much clearer. The same goes for my fender, but I suspect that if I plugged in something like a Les Paul and cranked up the distortion you wouldn't get the sort of raw chunky sound that you'd get from a dedicated guitar amp. Just try and see.
     
  8. Stimpy

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    The Problem with a hi-fi amp is that it is a hifi amp, giving a flat frequency response over a wide range.
    The trouble with guitar is that the low bass and high treble coming out of the pickups is not particularly pleasing on the ears.
    A dedicated guitar amp filters out these frequencies.
    In terms of sticking a CD with recorded guitar, the guitar will already have had all of the offending frequencies removed in the studio or via the amp the guitarist was using.
    Using an effect processor gets around this problem as they usually have some sort of speaker emulator, which does the above job.
    I would deffinatly recommend a compressor/limitor as the dynamic range of a guitar is that much higher than on a CD going from very quiet to very loud. Again guitar amps can deal with this as the have very high capacity transformers.
    PA amps are in some respects similar to guitar amps, which of course suffer from not sounding that nice.
     
  9. J.Gent

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    Stimpy are you from RSC?

    Anyway. Why not buy a budget headphone amp/monitor for your guitar and plug the headphone output into your AV amp. This will ensure that thoese nasty speaker smashing 1 - 20 Hz tones are filtered out (though they maybe by your amp anyway). If you have some cash and want a classic sound through your system get a Line 6 (£275?) pod or equivlant (i think Vtech make one for £199) these are combo effects and speaker/amp emulation devices that when plugged into mixing desks sound like miked up amps and such. There are seriously sweet. I have never seen one working only heard them on DEMO CD's on Guitarist mags and such. But when played back they sound magic..... and you can have all the overdrive and distortion you want as the output level is allways at the correct level.....
     
  10. Flimber

    Flimber
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    The little "Gordon Giltrap" type boxes are great for this, they output at line level and are low-noise and clean.

    Mike.
     
  11. wilber

    wilber
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    My son (18 year old music undergraduate) uses a Johnson J-Station amp emulater (about £120) pluggrd into his Hi-Fi amp when he's working on stuff at home on his guitar and bass & he's never complained once, which is most unusual for him - normally he would have expected "somebody" to have bought him a range of amps. Of course if he wants to record anything, then he uses the studio equipment at the music college.
     

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