1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

please explain 720p and 1080i

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by Hunterm8, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. Hunterm8

    Hunterm8
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2003
    Messages:
    115
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Leicester
    Ratings:
    +0
    could someone explain what the above is? i presume its some sort of resolution whats the p and the i stand for and whats the difference?

    sorry for the thickie question i did a search but couldnt really find anything.
     
  2. Tejstar

    Tejstar
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    Messages:
    22,482
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +990
    The p stands for progressive and i for interlaced.

    Interlaced scanning - this is the scan method used by the majority of televisions. Interlaced scanning TVs paint odd-numbered lines in succession, then go back and fill in the remaining even-numbered lines. This method is more prone to artifacts and less stable than progressive.

    Progressive scanning - this is the process by which all odd and even scanning lines are "painted" by an electron beam. This method reduces flicker and increases stability.

    Basically, TV 'resolution' refers to how many horizontal lines are displayed on your TV screen. (Although it is the horizontal lines that are counted, this is usually referred to as "vertical resolution" because the lines are counted from top to bottom - or vertically). For example the current Pioneer 454XDE has a resolution of 1024 (Hor) x 768 (Ver).

    720p and 1080i are regarded as the resolution needed for HDTV.

    1080i is not superior to 720p; 1080i has more scanning lines but also suffers the disadvantages of interlaced scanning. 720p has fewer lines but also has the advantages of progressive scanning and a constant vertical resolution of 720 lines, making it better able to handle motion.
     
  3. Hunterm8

    Hunterm8
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2003
    Messages:
    115
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Leicester
    Ratings:
    +0
    which would be better the lower progressive or the higher interlaced?

    ta just ansered in your edit :thumbsup:
     
  4. Thunder

    Thunder
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2004
    Messages:
    1,763
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Ratings:
    +14
    Conventional standard definition PAL and NTSC software have 576i and 480i resolutions :) . i stands for interlaced which means that if you imagine the picture to be made up of, for example 480 lines. With one scan you would see all the odd numbered lines e.g 1,3,5 and with the next scan you woud see all the even numbered lines e.g 2,4,6 etc :smashin: . p stands for progressive which with one scan presents all 480/576 lines, in effect it doubles the resolution and makes the picture sharper and eliminates "jaggies". 720p and 1080i are classed as high definition formats, 720 is progressive and 1080 is interlaced (although there is also a 1080p). These resolutions can only be obtained from high definition formats or "simulated" for want of a better word with a scaler :thumbsup:
     
  5. Thunder

    Thunder
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2004
    Messages:
    1,763
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Ratings:
    +14
    Oops, Tejstar beat me to it :D Im not a very fast typist :blush:
     
  6. Hunterm8

    Hunterm8
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2003
    Messages:
    115
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Leicester
    Ratings:
    +0
    thanks guys
     

Share This Page

Loading...