PlasmaDan's Build Project Archive

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by Plasma Dan, May 16, 2017.

  1. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    PlasmaDan's Build Project Archive

    Over the years I've worked on a lot of different types of build projects. I have decided to share some of the highlights with you all on here. The earliest project photos I was able to dig-up are from 2005 (age 15) so that's where this thread starts. The dates shown are the completion dates of each project (or best estimates) and some of the older photos are not the best quality.

    I will use this thread as an index for some existing threads and to share any future projects.


    Go-kart Project (June 2005)​

    Originally started by my dad a few years earlier, this is one of my first notable projects. I took-over the project after my dad's business took-off and he became too busy to work on it.

    Built mostly from 40 x 1.5mm square box-section steel, the go-kart chassis is roughly based on an F1 stock car (apparently). My dad was an F1 stock car driver back in the day so I guess he got the inspiration from that. It's powered by a modest Honda 90cc 4-stroke 3-speed engine; salvaged from an old Honda moped. It features a roll-cage, front & rear hydraulic brakes, full suspension, electric starter and low-power headlights. All the parts are salvaged from various donor vehicles or found around the workshop.

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    After the project's completion in 2005 the go-kart was featured in the local news paper.

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    Day 1 of the build...

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    Rear axle and suspension work...

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    The basic frame and suspension roughed-out...

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    This is as far as my dad got with the build before abandoning it. You can see some of the other contraptions we had in the background, unfortunately there's not many photos of those.

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    After taking-over the project I worked on it mostly at weekends, as I was still attending school.

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    I still have this go-kart to this day; in storage. I have thought about selling it but I'm not sure I could part with it, it's worth more to me than any sum of money. Unfortunately I don't really have anywhere to use it so it's just gathering dust.

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    Dan.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2017
  2. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Loft Conversion (May 2006)​

    Another project I worked-on mainly at weekends; a DIY loft conversion in my dad's circa 1890's mid-terraced house. The room was to become my new bedroom so I just did everything how I wanted it.

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    Originally I had installed a wooden folding ladder to access the converted loft. I later replaced this with a custom built staircase in circa June 2007; during the renovation of the bedroom below.

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    Dan.
     
  3. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Solid Pine TV Unit (May 2006)​

    This solid pine TV unit was built specifically for the newly converted loft. It was designed to hold an upright standing Xbox 360, a DVD player or similar and a selection of games / DVDs.

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    Dan.
     
  4. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Utility Cupboard & Small Table (June 2006)​

    The power cables for the new loft conversion were chased into the walls leading to the consumer-unit downstairs. While the walls were being patched-up again I decided to rip-out the old utility cupboard and build something better instead.

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    The old utility cupboard had way too much height and not enough depth to support anything larger than a DVD player and a small TV (barely).

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    Old cupboard ripped-out and cables for loft conversion patched-up...

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    While building the new cupboard I also added some sockets and a data plate so we could finally get-rid of the extension lead that was previously powering everything.

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    The front of the cupboard was panelled using plasterboard and skimmed so it could match the walls.

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    I used standard pine FixBoard sheets to make the top & doors for the cupboard. I had a large off-cut left-over so I decided to make a small table at the same time. The table was built to replace the poorly constructed Ikea table that we already had, so was built to the same height.

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    The legs of the table were dowelled & glued to the top, then braced with 2x1.

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    The utility cupboard was later ripped-out to make-way for the new cinema room (see here). However I do still have the small table.

    Dan.
     
  5. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Fitted Desk & Shelving (July 2006)​

    The good thing about my parents being separated was having 2 bedrooms. This fitted desk & shelving is something I worked-on at my mum's house during my final year at School. After trying & failing to find a suitable desk to fit into this space I realised the total width was just under 8ft; the size of a standard sheet of plywood, so I decided to build a desk instead. The desk is constructed from Chinese hardwood ply, 2x1 batten and edged with a profiled pine bead.

    The completed office suite is finished with a medium oak stain & clear coat varnish; matching the new doors, skirting boards, windowsill and oak hardwood floor. The darker colour of the Chinese hardwood creates an attractive contrast between the pine and the desk & shelf surfaces.

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    My room was somewhat of a mess during the work...

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    I was able to form a curve into the pine edging using hot water and slowly bending it until it resembled the profile I needed. The edging was then glued & pinned in place and sanded smooth.

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    I also ripped-out and replaced the bedroom & airing cupboard doors, skirting boards and windowsill (something my mum was not so happy about). Everything was stained and varnished to match.

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    I installed the shelves a few years earlier, rather than rip them out and replace them I simply laminated them top & bottom with 1/4" ply to match the desk.

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    My modest collection of plasma globes; the original inspiration for the name Plasma Dan.

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    Since I was paying for everything myself, I had to save-up for the hardwood floor so that wasn't installed until 2007.

    Dan.
     
  6. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Garage Counter (Aug 2006)​

    My dad asked me to build a new counter for his garage. I don't think he really wanted anything fancy but I did enjoy building this. It provided customers a convenient place for making payments and improved the overall aesthetics of the garage entrance. My dad has since moved to another unit so this is now gone. These few photos are all that's left.

    The counter was constructed with a 2x1 batten frame, wrapped with a 1/4" sheet of Chinese hardwood ply to form the curved profile, with a matching colour top.

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    Dad's old cluttered desk area...

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    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  7. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Celeritas: First PC Build (Sep 2006)​

    My first ever PC build was quite unusual. I sacrificed an old in-car DVD player screen to use a small built-in monitor for the tower. I used this as my main PC for about a year, after which it was re-purposed as a local file-server.

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    The original plastic enclosure for the in-car DVD player screen was trimmed to fit into the top 3 drive bays, glued into place and filled-up with body filler.

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    The original PCB for the screen was too wide to fit inside the drive bay, so it was mounted perpendicular instead.

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    The PC specs were never anything to boast about; even back then, but it was pretty cool for a first PC.

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  8. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Another Loft Conversion (Apr 2007)​

    This was my first ever job, started in summer of 2006 (age 16). A friend of the family had seen my loft conversion and asked if I could do theirs. The front bedroom in this circa 1890's house (same era as my house) was very large compared to the tiny bathroom and back bedroom, so before starting the loft conversion I ripped-out the small landing area to the bathroom on the rear of the house and used the space to extend the back bedroom. A new landing area was created by partitioning the front bedroom instead, this also became the landing area for the new staircase.

    This was the first staircase & balustrade I had worked on, so I'm quite proud how it turned-out. The entire staircase was built from scratch, with a notched stringer layout. The skirting from the loft conversion continues all the way down the stairs to make for an unusual but attractive finish, especially with the matching pine balustrade. The under-stairs storage space is used as a large walk-in wardrobe for the front bedroom.

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    The balustrade continues into the loft to enclose the opening for the stairs.

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    The first week of the conversion...

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    Rather than close-off the eaves, they were utilised as storage spaces.

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    The winder section at the top of the staircase was constructed, then the stringers attached to form the straight run. The stud-work for the loft leads down through the stair opening to reinforce the top section of the stairs, since there is no stringer on the winder section.

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    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  9. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Pine Radiator Cover (July 2007)​

    This radiator cover was the final piece of my bedroom renovation. The front panel & top lid are mounted with brass piano hinges to allow easy access to the radiator. The completed radiator cover is fitted to the wall, stained to match the desk & skirting and finished with a clear-coat varnish.

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    I removed the radiator and sprayed it black to help prevent if from being seen through the grille.

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    Dan.
     
  10. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Celeritas II: PC Build (Oct 2008)​

    Since I had more money at this age I decided to upgrade to a better PC. This was my main PC for a few years before the next upgrade. I chose a small form-factor case with a front carry handle because I knew I'd be heading to uni the following year and this would be coming with me. I don't really remember the specs, but it was decent for the time.

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    I mounted the monitor to the wall with a plate of 2mm steel, drilled & slotted for a standard 100x100 VESA mount. This allowed me to mount the monitor just 2mm away from the wall. I sunk the cables into the wall for a cleaner look.

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    Transferring data from the old PC...

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    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  11. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    First HTPC (Nov 2008)​

    My first HTPC was built to fit into the Solid Pine TV Unit I had made previously. I had to use a small form-factor case to fit into the small space. This SilverStone LC02 was an ideal fit.

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    The LC02 case was really designed for very low power PCs, but I required something good enough for 1080p HD playback. Back then that required generating some heat, so I cut-out a large double vent for the top of the case, meant for use with double 120mm radiators.

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    The LC02 I bought off eBay did not come with a power supply, but a small form-factor power supply of the time probably wouldn't have had enough power for the system I was using anyway. I opted to use a full size ATX power supply instead, but keep it outside the case. I used 2 D-sub connectors to create a way to quickly disconnect the power supply from the case.

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    Dan.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2017
  12. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Projector Bracket (Nov 2008)​

    I bought my first projector at age 18; an Optoma HD700X. I made this ceiling bracket one day rather than buy something. I always liked how discrete it was, considering the high ceiling. The cables run up through the tube and into the floor space above.

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    Here's a piece of trivia: the tube is actually an off-cut from the chrome T bar from my go-kart on the first post.

    Dan.
     
  13. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    First Home Cinema (Apr 2009)​

    My first home cinema was a modest setup, with a Sony STR-DG820 AVR, Optoma HD700X projector, Pioneer 5.1 surround, games console and a new HTPC.

    The case used for the HTPC was a Wisdon HTPC220B, a very nice looking case with a solid aluminium front bezel, iMON VFD display, IR receiver and volume control. I always loved this HTPC case, I actually still have it in it's box in the attic cupboard somewhere.

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    I had a 112" 16:9 screen on the far wall, which was amazing for both movies and gaming.

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    Back before XBMC / Kodi became the norm, I was using iMON with iMEDIAN as my media centre software.

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    Building the HTPC...

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    I actually owned a Blu-ray / HD DVD combo reader. In-fact I think it's still inside the case in the loft cupboard. :D

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    Dan.
     
  14. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Shed Build (May 2009)​

    After the old outbuilding was knocked down, this garden lost a lot of storage space. I was asked to build this shed to emend that problem. This was my 2nd shed build, I never got any photos of the 1st, but they were constructed in the same way.

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    The shed was built with an exterior-grade plywood base and framed-out with 3x2 scant timber.

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    The roof was designed to be removable so it could easily be re-felted in the future, something which did come in-handy several years later.

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    The shed was cladded with TGV softwood. I actually regret this decision, it looked good for a while but the untreated timber didn't last very long. These day's I would use ship-lap or pressure treated TGV instead.

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    I added an acrylic window to the shed to bring in some light. This was actually an off-cut from the acrylic sheet used to create the windowed side-panel for the Celeritas PC build.

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    To save cost, anywhere where the TGV wouldn't be seen, plywood sheets were used instead. A strip of felt was used to create a weatherproof transition between the TGV and the ply.

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    As far as I know the shed is still standing to this day, although it's probably in bad condition now.

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  15. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Celeritas III: PC Build (Feb 2011)​

    This project took place in my student accommodation at Bangor university. I'd been due for an upgrade for a while, I needed something more capable to do 3D modelling & rendering; something I was trying to teach myself while at uni.

    The old case from Celeritas II was scrapped in my first year at uni and replaced with a plain looking Antec 300 instead, so as to make-way for my continuously expanding media collection. This very quickly became full of drives also, so I opted for a super-tower for my next build.

    The Lian-Li PC-A70F super-tower case was a beautifully built all aluminium case, with space for 10x 3.5" plus 5x 5.25" drives. To this day this is one of the best PC cases I have owned.

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    Celeritas III Specs:
    • ASUS M4A89GTD PRO/USB 3
    • AMD PHENOM II X6 1055T Retail @ 3.37GHz (20% overclock)
    • Corsair H70 liquid cooler
    • 8GB Corsair Vengeance DDR3 1600MHz RAM
    • Corsair TX650W PSU
    • Highpoint RocketRAID 2310 SATA II RAID Controller
      • 4x 2TB Samsung Spinpint F4 (RAID 5 @ 6TB)
    • Highpoint RocketRAID 640 SATA III RAID Controller
      • 4x 1.5TB Samsung Spinpoint F1 (RAID 5 @ 4.5TB)
    • Corsair F60 SSD
    • 250GB Western Digital 2.5" Scorpio Blue
    • 2x SATA Pioneer DVD-RW
    • Blackmagic Design Intensity Pro HDMI Capture Card
    • VIA SATA RAID Controller

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    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  16. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Celeritas 3.1: PC Upgrade (May 2011)​

    While at university I had been temporarily using my main PC to host my media collection on the house network (something which made me quite popular with my housemates). This started to become troublesome after a while since my main PC had to stay online 24/7 and it wasn't exactly the cheapest PC to run in terms of electricity. I decided I needed a file-server like the one I had at home, but something I could transport easily.

    After some thinking, I decided to embed a secondary system into Celeritas III. There was more than enough space to do it, the case already supported the use of dual power supplies so it was a simple enough mod.

    I made an ITX form-factor motherboard tray out of a sheet of aluminium and mounted it to some existing threaded holes on the bottom of the case. I also took the opportunity to use the new motherboard tray to hold 2 extra 2.5" drives underneath.

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    The entire system had to be completely re-built to accommodate the changes to the RAID configuration and move one of the RAID controllers to the new ITX system.

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    The bottom 4 drives form the main storage area for my media collection, in RAID 5. At this stage I had to split-up my data and separate media from everything else. Everything that wasn't going to be shared on the local network was kept on the other 4 drives for the workstation.

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    All the cables for the new ITX system had to be fed outside of the case via some short extensions.

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    The lower SSD was the boot drive for the server and the upper SSD for the workstation.

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    There were quite a lot of cables to fit into the case at this point.

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    The power & reset buttons for the server system were hidden underneath the aluminium front bezel.

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    Front IO for the server system was achieved using a multi-function panel in the lower 5.25" drive bay. Another panel was added to the top drive bay for use with the workstation.

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    Both systems up & running...

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    Secondary System Specs:
    • ASUS M4A88T-I DELUXE
    • AMD ATHLON II X2 250 Retail @ 3.0GHz (stock)
    • SilverStone NT01-E Copper CPU cooler (fanless)
    • 4GB Corsair DDR3 1333MHz RAM
    • Corsair 430W PSU
    • Highpoint RocketRAID 2310 SATA II RAID Controller
      • 4x 2TB Samsung Spinpint F4 (RAID 5 @ 6TB)
    • Corsair F60 SSD
    • 250GB Western Digital 2.5" Scorpio Blue
    • 1x SATA Pioneer DVD-RW
    • Total Idle Power Consumption ~70W

    This was my setup for quite a few years before I decided to switch to rackmount to make life easier.

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  17. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    Desks & Cabinet (June 2011)​

    I used to run a small business building & selling PCs, but I had way too much computer stuff and nowhere to put it all. I decided to build a set of desks to use as workbenches for building / testing the PCs.

    Each desk has power sockets built-in to make things easier when building / testing PCs. The desks & cabinet are constructed from exterior-grade ply and pine batten of varying sizes. The surfaces are edged with a profiled pine bead to give them a neat look and finished with a coat of high-gloss polyurethane varnish. Inside the cabinet is a specially designed shelving system for storing spare computer parts & stock.

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    I still have these desks, although they have since been split-up and re-purposed as workbenches for the garage.

    Dan.
     
  18. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
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    University Engineering Project (Mar 2012)​

    Electronic Engineering Project: Multi-Function...

    This project was to design & build a prototype for a marketable electronics product during my 2nd year at university. The chosen project, named "Multi-Function Bench Power Supply" was a concept for a four-in-one bench device for use in laboratory environments. This ambitious project and all supporting documentation was completed by myself in under 7 months.

    This was also my first AutoCAD model. This wasn't a requirement for the project but it's something that I wanted to learn.

    Designing the Multi-Function Bench Power...

    I also toyed with animating the 3D model of the PCB using POV-Ray.

    Electronic Engineering Project: Multi-Function...

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    Prototype for the function generator & frequency counter...

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    Transferring the PCB design to the copper clad board...

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    Etching the PCB...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I had to buy myself a drill press to drill all the holes. I stayed up all night drilling out each hole in my uni halls. :laugh:

    [​IMG]

    Dry fit...

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    Power-up & test...

    [​IMG]

    Needless to say I received a very good grade for this project.

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  19. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
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    HTC One L: Design Concept (Aug 2012)​

    This was a "just for fun" model that I created in AutoCAD. Some of the proposed specs are somewhat outdated now. The concept was featured on several tech news websites and sparked some controversy over the camera position. :rolleyes:

    The HTC One L design concept takes the best features of HTC's flagship smart phone, the HTC One X+™, and builds upon them further. With a 1.7GHz Tegra 3 quad core processor, double the RAM of the One X+™, 8-megapixel camera with 1080p recording, and 64GB of built-in flash storage, the HTC One L design concept pushes to get the most out of mobile technology to date. The HTC One L has the main camera positioned in the centre of the phone, to be operated more like a real point & shoot camera, this also makes it easier to hold the phone with both hands, for those perfect steady shots.

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    HTC One L Design Concept


    You can view / download the 3D model here: GrabCAD - CAD library

    Dan.
     
  20. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
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    Log Burner Install (Sep 2012)​

    While I was at uni my dad decided to rip-out the gas fire in the back room to make-way for a log burner instead. When I came back for the summer holidays there was just a hole in the wall and nothing had been done, so it was down to me to finish it off as usual.

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    After opening-up the hole I removed some of the bricks around the base of the chimney stack to fit the new flu liner. I also took the opportunity to re-point some of the exposed brickwork.

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    I used a length of steel flat bar to support the chimney stack. I ended-up having to raise it further as the flu-liner didn't bend as much as I thought it would to reach the register plate.

    Once I knew the liner would fit, I started building the surround for the new fireplace. I used 3 steel reinforced concrete lintels to form the shape of the new fireplace. These ended-up the perfect length so they just went straight in as they were.

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    I used black limestone for the hearth. This was my first time using a Stihl; saw which was quite fun. :)

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    I used sheets of 1mm steel as a heat shield to protect the bricks. This is made in 2 halves then tack-welded together. The steel is mounted on brackets around 1" away from the brick.

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    Flue liner dropped down from the roof...

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    This is just a standard register plate which I pop-riveted to the the steel back.

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    The final section of steel is attached with bolts so it can be removed from below if needed.

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    First test...

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    [​IMG]

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  21. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
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    +562
    First Rackmount Server (Mar 2013)​

    With my storage requirements ever increasing, I ended-up needing more physical HDDs than even my Lian-Li super tower could fit. I decided to move away from tower cases and migrate to a full-on rackmount setup instead.

    I shopped around for an off the shelf solution but couldn't find one within my budget, so I opted for a custom solution. The 24-bay drive-caddy I chose offered plenty of drive space, room for future expansion and hot-swappable trays. However this was actually a full length server case to begin with; bought from xcase.co.uk. The current version of this case (here) is slightly different.

    With 8x 3TB HDDs in RAID5, this server could hold a total of 19.1TB of data on the main array, with space for backup drives and redundancy for the future.

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    I already had a decent 16-port gigabit switch which was more than enough at the time, so rather than buy a new switch or have a mess of cables I installed this switch in a "permanent" way on a shelf near the top-rear of the rack. I used a 24-port patch panel to link to the hidden switch, this gave me easy access to connect cables as needed. 8 of these ports were linked directly to the rear of the rack cabinet to an 8-way Cat5e keystone panel.

    [​IMG]

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    On the back of the cabinet I installed an IEC socket for a standard kettle lead. This was connected directly to the 6-way PDU strip. I also installed a large cable grommet for other cables; bought from here.

    [​IMG]

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    I installed patch leads to connect the rear ports directly into the switch so I could plug devices into the back of the cabinet to connect to the network easily. In the event that I ever needed a direct connection for any other purpose it's just a case of unplugging the patch lead.

    [​IMG]

    8 shiny new 3TB Seagate Barracuda HDDs...

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    The RM424 server case was chopped right-down to just the drive-caddy, using the internal fan-wall as the new back panel. This was the only reasonably priced solution I could find that would allow this number of drives in a short depth cabinet.

    [​IMG]

    Transferring data from Celeritas III to the new array...

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    The old drives from Celeritas III were used as backup drives for the new array.

    [​IMG]

    Celeritas III became a single tower once again...

    [​IMG]

    Unfortunately the Seagate drives didn't last very long. I managed to get around 18 months of 24/7 use out of them before they started systematically failing one-by-one. That's not bad really considering they were not designed for 24/7 operation, but I was on a limited budget at the time of building the server. All of the drives were replaced in December 2015 with Western Digital enterprise-class drives, rated for 24/7 usage and backed with 5-year warranties.

    [​IMG]

    During the upgrade I also finally managed to source an Intel RES2CV360 RAID expander in the UK; after months of searching. Until acquiring this, the SAS back-planes had to be individually linked to the server RAID controller, which meant 6x SAS cables plus multiple power cables running between the drive-caddy and the server itself. The RES2CV360 allows for a much more elegant solution.

    [​IMG]

    The RES2CV360 fits snugly behind the back-planes in the drive-caddy. I mounted it by attaching plastic stand-off posts then gluing them to the steel base with Araldite rapid. The short SAS cables were included with the expander.

    [​IMG]

    I mounted an internal to external SAS adaptor to the rear of the drive -caddy, plus a high-current D-SUB connector to provide the power via a custom-made cable.

    [​IMG]

    The server itself is pretty simple, just a standard micro-ATX system with an SSD boot drive. There is a substantial power supply to provide all the power needed for up-to 24x HDDs. I chose the Corsair HX750i due to the fact that the fan actually never spins under normal load, which helps with dust reduction. This power-supply also has the ability to monitor the power usage via Corsair Link software; which is useful to keep an eye on the electricity usage.

    [​IMG]

    The cables for the drive-caddy are connected through 2 of the expansion slots.

    [​IMG]

    At some point in the future I plan to replace the guts of this server with all ECC compatible hardware for use with FreeNAS. Then I can finally do-away with RAID all-together.

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  22. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

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    Rackmount Server Bracket (Mar 2014)​

    As part of the grand plan to convert the living room into an office / cinema room, the server cabinet needed relocating. The only decent available space for the server was the attic. I bought a smaller 6U cabinet to house the server in the attic cupboard. I needed clear access to the server from inside the cupboard but I didn't want to block the cupboard opening completely, so I came-up with a dual-sliding-rail solution to tuck the server to one side.

    The rails used for the bracket are the ones originally supplied with the RM424 server case. They're designed to hold some serious weight with plenty of travel so they're ideal.

    [​IMG]

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    The bracket was made using left-over lengths of square box-section & angle steel.

    [​IMG]

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    Since the new cabinet was so compact, heat build-up was a real concern. I decided to add 3x 120mm exhaust fans on the back of the cabinet to extract the heat.

    [​IMG]

    A few years previous I bought a hydraulic sheet-metal punch for doing exactly this type of thing. I used this to create clean cut-outs for the fans.

    [​IMG]

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    Once the punch is positioned correctly it takes very little effort to punch-out this thin sheet steel.

    [​IMG]

    I drilled-out screw mounting holes to accept standard 120mm PC fans.

    [​IMG]

    The 6U cabinet just fits into the allocated space...

    [​IMG]

    I installed separate rails for the drive-caddy and server to make maintenance easier. I also added a large cable grommet for the various server cables.

    [​IMG]

    Server installed and running...

    [​IMG]

    The entire cabinet can be tucked-away to allow access to the cupboard.

    [​IMG]

    3x Noctua Industrial high static-pressure fans maintain the temperature.

    [​IMG]

    The heat is exhausted through separate slate vents installed into the roof.

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    [​IMG]

    All the cables for the server are tied together with enough slack to allow the cabinet to fully extend on the rails.

    [​IMG]

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  23. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
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    +562
    Network Rack (Mar 2014)​

    This was a modest network rack I installed for a client. The rack contains the entire networking apparatus for the building, with room for future expansion.

    The installation was done in Cat6, for use with PoE (Power over Ethernet) devices such as IP cameras, IP phones and access points.

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]

    Dan.
     
  24. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
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    Garage Workbench (Apr 2014)​

    A project I did for my dad to help create some extra space in his garage. We acquired a length of 40mm kitchen worktop through a friend, so I put it to use as a new work surface.

    After clearing some space I built a steel support frame for the worktop to sit on. Chipboard has a tendency to droop over time unless properly supported, so this was necessary. It was also very likely to be supporting some heavy toolboxes at some point so it had to be strong.

    [​IMG]

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    We had a bunch of old whiteboards in storage, so I used some of them to hide the small window and some of the wiring on the wall. Cheap roofing batten was used to mount the whiteboards to the wall.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    With the worktop and whiteboards installed, I also added some extra fluorescent lighting and a power socket for a PC in the corner.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    Needless to say my dad was quite happy with the result.

    Dan.
     
  25. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

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    Mitre Saw Stand (May 2014)​

    During the build-up to my office / cinema room project I was preparing materials & equipment needed. One thing I'd always wanted was a mitre saw stand. I already had a Triton SuperJaws saw horse so I figured rather than buy a saw stand I could just make an attachment for the SuperJaws.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The attachment supports material on each side to make cutting easier.

    [​IMG]

    The saw itself is bolted down using M10 resin anchor bolts.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Dan.
     
  26. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
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    Garage Tyre Rack (June 2014)​

    Another project for my dad; a rack for storing and displaying new tyres in his garage. With the amount of tyres he does on a daily basis, this was a long overdue addition.

    [​IMG]

    The tyre rack was built using lengths of 50 x 3mm square box-section and tube steel. The staircase makes for an easy way to reach high-up so the tyre rack was built to the height of the shutter to offer as-much space as possible.

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    The tyre rack is bolted down to the concrete with masonry anchors and welded to the shutter at the top for additional support.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  27. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
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    Window Bay Skirting (July 2014)​

    A small joinery job I did for a client; replacing the skirting boards around this awkward window bay.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Since the windowsill was done in sections, the new skirting was done the same way to match.

    [​IMG]

    The sections were glued together and adhered to the wall with grab adhesive.

    [​IMG]

    Once the skirting is caulked and the gaps hidden it starts to look much better.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

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    I completed the skirting around the rest of the room. I also took the opportunity to raise the sockets away from skirting level and add some ethernet & coax outlets. All of the bedrooms in this house received the same treatment.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Dan.
     
  28. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

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    End Terraced Loft Conversion (Dec 2014)​

    Another loft conversion project I did. The loft is split into two sections, the main room and a full-length "crawl-in" cupboard. There is also extra storage space in one of the eave sections. The client was very keen to create as-much usable storage space as possible, in the hopes of being able to open-up some space in other parts of the house.

    This project has it's own thread here; with lots more photos and details about the conversion.

    [​IMG]

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    Dan.
     
  29. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

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    Under Stairs Door Conversion (Dec 2014)​

    An interesting under stairs door conversion I worked on. The client wanted to open-up the stairs without spoiling the look of the original panelling. I used my new Festool TS55 to cut-out a door from the original panelled wall to create a discrete finish.

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    Each of the cuts had to be finished by hand to completely cut-out the door.

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    Once removed, the door was reinforced and attached with standard door hinges.

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    A hidden push-latch was added to maintain the discrete look of the door.

    Dan.
     
  30. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
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    Security Shed Build (May 2015)​

    This was a side project to my DIY cinema build (here). Prior to starting my cinema build I had acquired a lot of tools & equipment, most of which was kept in the room while I was working on it. About half-way through the project I had to level the floor which meant clearing-out the whole room of everything, including my collection of tools. I don't have a secure garage or safe place to store my tools, and I certainly wouldn't keep them in a cheap wooden shed. So, I decided I was just going to have to build a secure shed myself.

    This project has it's own thread here; with lots more photos and details about the build.

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    Dan.
     

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