Pioneer 5090 and retro games - screen too white

Discussion in 'Plasma TVs Forum' started by Bristol Rover, Jul 30, 2012.

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  1. Bristol Rover

    Bristol Rover
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    Thought I'd dig out a couple of old N64 games and have a go on the plasma over the weekend.

    The problem I had was that the screen was too white, and I whatever settings I played around with I couldn't solve it.

    The link below shows a picture of an example - a snow race in Mario Kart 64. You can't see the track, making the game unplayable. Apologies for it being a link but it wouldn't recognise the image when I inserted a URL.

    It should look like this, and does on my small LCD TV:


    Can anyone recommend a setting that might help, or is my TV faulty? I am using the 'game' preset on the TV's functions but it's no good.

    Advice appreciated,

    BR
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2019
  2. Chelsea_Fan

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    I've seen this on my 5090 as well on certain film scenes. It only happens rarely and isn't as severe as your images but I suspect this may be a subtle side effect of Pioneer's high contrast driving on the 9G range.

    I think something in the TV technology limits the ability to show detail in scenes that have lots of detail that is very close to white. It may be a limitation of the high contrast driving or maybe the TV is kicking in some protection to prevent thermal stress on the screen. The penalty is that you sometimes get bleached out detail on winter scenes or scenes that are mostly white.

    Playing with the contrast or brightness doesn't really help.

    However, I'm sure there will be someone here who will tell you your (and my TV) is faulty as only faulty kuros have a less than perfect image.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2012
  3. stucarblne

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    Hi it doesn't sound like a fault as such, but like chelsea fan said the way these are driven.

    But when i raise in the service menu too high... Say ABL or VOL SUS. It clips white detail. Best way to check is in a room void of any light. Could try lowering ABL between 5 and 10 clicks, (lower if you wanted to) The difference to overall contrast is very minimal imo anyway. And may help with your white detail.

    ABL is set at different numbers for different drive modes. So if you are using game mode that will automatically be under drive mode 1 and the default ABL should be 121. Lowering it may help.

    You can find ABL in the service menu under ( PANEL - 2 ADJ )
     
  4. gizlaroc

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    Is that a pal N64?
     
  5. phorenzik

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    I was wondering if this could be a UK N64 (lack of RGB) issue as well.

    UK N64s only transmit in composite and a lot of N64 scart cables are not wired correctly for UK consoles and they totally screw up the picture.

    It could be that this is happening?

    Try using the horrible red, yellow, white composite plugs if you have them and see if this issue still persists.
     
  6. BJQ1972

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    I didn't think any PAL N64s were RGB SCART compatible. I know they have a problem with S-Video cables - the cables that work with the SNES need to be modded by soldering in a resistor - otherwise the image is very bright as the OP describes.
     
  7. phorenzik

    phorenzik
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    I have a UK N64 and a Japanese RGB modded console. My Japanese RGB scart works on my UK N64
    but outputs a horribly washed out image that's worse than RF.

    The reason I posted was just in case the OP had bought an N64 scart cable from ebay/online retailer and was using one of these RGB scarts on a UK N64 console.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2012
  8. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
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    blown out high luminance stuff is usually caused by the analogue to digital side of the tv being overdriven from the console. IE the signal is too high out the N64. If you are lucky you can turn down the contrast on the tv and it may bring back the detail.
     
  9. gizlaroc

    gizlaroc
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    The PAL N64 would output composite and S-Video.
    It used a converter to convert the S into RGBs.

    The NTSC N64's could ouyput RGB but were not wired to do so, you needed to run the three wires straight from the video chip or from solder points on the underside of the PCB.
    However, the output was very low. To get round this you could solder a jumper to boost the output, this then gave a slightly over driven RGB signal but far better than the very under driven signal.
    The downside to this was it meant that S-Video was now far too hot and gave an image as you as seeing above.

    I know you couldn't use NTSC cables on a Pal machine but I never owned a pal machine, so not sure which way round it was.
    On the SNES if you used a PAL scart on a Jap machine it was overblown.

    I have them all upstairs I will try and test.
    I have a 5090 too so will try them on that.
     
  10. BJQ1972

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