Picture slightly 'muddy'/contrast? - poor colour separation? on INFocus IN76

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Sunchpunch, Feb 25, 2013.

  1. Sunchpunch

    Sunchpunch
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    Hi all,

    Hadn't had this set up in a while so went up into the loft to rescue this.

    Set it all up fine and used a homemade MDF Projection screen about 5ft x 3ft painted a matt white.

    Having used a couple of THX setup discs and so forth, I'm finding the picture less than satisfactory for films tbh.

    The main thing running through it is my gaming rig P.C. Game seem nice and clear, no issues etc. But films, specifically ones with dark scenes e.g. The Dark Knight Rises, seem almost 'muddy' - or the colour separation seems poor.

    Is this a contrast issue? The room itself has cream walls, but has no other light sources, but I'm wondering if the light is bouncing off the light walls?

    I have yet to put a black border to 'frame' the image, but just wondering what the deal is as the picture seems to lack a lot of punch.

    Cheers.
     
  2. KelvinS1965

    KelvinS1965
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    The light walls will be reducing ANSI contrast such that dark scenes with bright objects in will be made lighter by the reflected light from your walls (and probably ceiling since this is often the worst culprit). It might also be a calibration issue since if the gamma is too high for the contrast of the projector, it will suffer from crushing blacks.

    The other point is that your gaming PC and player (if you use a separate one rather than the PC itself) will require different settings anyway. PCs can use 0-255 levels whereas DVD/BluRay uses 16-235. This means that a display set up for PC use will tend to have raised blacks and lower contrast when used for DVD/BluRay.
     
  3. Sunchpunch

    Sunchpunch
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    Hmmm thanks for all the info.

    I've run through quite a few Blu-Rays and MKV's and have got a few presets saved for each that seem to be universally pretty good across a range of HD material now.

    I found that gamma set to CRT is the best way to go for 'truer' blacks, than the 'film' gamma setting also.

    I assume a black border will help this issue as well though?
    would a light grey coat on the MDF also help?

    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2013
  4. KelvinS1965

    KelvinS1965
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    I prefer a nicely framed image myself: I have a 2.35:1 screen so 'scope' films are properly framed and I made some velvet side masks for when I watch 16:9 content (as it doesn't fill the width of my screen for this content). However, the border can also highlight that your projector isn't producing black, but just dark grey, so can be a double edged sword. I prefer to watch the picture than the surround so the framing works for me.

    The gamma setting of 'CRT' might be too high if it was measured: Typically if calibrated with meters and software a gamma of 2.2 might be targeted (or higher for a very dark walled room with a projector with higher on/off contrast than the IN76). It might be that 'CRT' would measure 2.4 for all we know which would be too high for your projector's contrast and the light walled room. Might be worth pausing a dark scene and just trying different gamma settings to see if there is one that reduces the problem.

    Ideally the gamma would be adjusted at different points in the range, but this might not be possible on the IN76 without using an (expensive) external video processor. For example I set my gamma to 2.3 above 30% and lower it towards 2.2 or even 2.1 as it goes towards 0% (ie black). This gives depth/punch to bright scenes, but stops the dark scenes looking 'muddy'. You may not have luxury of this level of adjustment, so just chose the setting that gives the best compromise.
     

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