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Picture Settings Sharp Aquos Please Help

Discussion in 'Plasma TVs' started by mrpickford, Sep 14, 2004.

  1. mrpickford

    mrpickford
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    Hello,

    I have recently purchased Sharp Aquos LC22SV2E, however as the reviews on homecinemachoice.com state the picture settings out of the box are far from satisfactory.

    As I am no expert (I am quite a novice) I would really appreciate some help from anyone who can assist me in configuring the picture settings for this TV.

    I am using the TV in the bedroom and it is used for DVD, PS2, Sky Digital and some Terrestrial channels,

    If you are not familiar with the set the settings are:

    Contrast 0 to 60
    Colour -30 to 30
    Black -30 to 30
    Sharpness -3 to 3
    Red Blue -30 to 30 (ie -30 is red 30 is blue)
    Green - 30 to 30

    I would really appreciate any help on this.

    Thanks a lot

    Craig Pickford
     
  2. LV426

    LV426
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    The trick with any LCD panel is to get the brightness and contrast values just right - so as to make the most of the limited contrast range LCDs have by their nature, without losing anything of the image.

    The easiest (and often cheapest) tool for this is a (any) DVD with THX branding on it (eg Indiana Jones trilogy and many others). Somewhere on the menu of the main feature disc (if there are 2 in the set) will be a THX Optimiser which is a set of simple, but useful test signals. There is also explanatory text.

    Use the brightness (black) control to adjust the correct visibility of the black/dark tests; use contrast to get optimal visibility of the (near) white tests.

    It may well be the case that the TV requires different values for PAL and NTSC; you can only find this out by repeating these tests, using THX DVDs of both types (if you have them). If you don't use any NTSC, then just forget it.

    As for the other tweaks - colour to your preference; Red/Blue and Green to your preference (these will all affect the colour of the picture). Sharpness is best left at the point where it dioes nothing to the image (which I guess is 0) - higher and it will add rings around contrasty edges; lower and it will blur the image.

    If you can't find a THX DVD, then do this instead (for the black level):

    Take any letterboxed DVD (i.e. one which contains black bars over and below the picture. Play it. Manually adjust the TV's aspect ratio to the 4x3 setting. This may well distort the DVD image; that's not important. Now - compare the black area above and below the film with the black area left and right of the film (put there by the TV in 4x3 mode). Turn the black level up till you can see a difference. Now turn it back down until you literally just can't see any difference. Then increase it again by one "notch". Reset your TV to it proper "shape".

    You can't set the white (contrast) as easily without a useful test signal. The important thing with white is not to lose anything. Contrast is too high if (say) an area of sky which should have visible shadings in the clouds and/or in between, hasn't - is a uniform full white colour.


    Connect the DVD to the TV using a fully-wired SCART cable into an RGB-enabled input. Ditto for $ky. If it only has one RGB-enabled SCART, then if either $ky or DVD has 2 SCARTs on it this is for loopthrough purposes; go SCART DVD>$ky>TV or $ky>DVD>TV according to what sockets there are.
     
  3. David Mackenzie

    David Mackenzie
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    I had always had doing this in mind for my Sony KLV26HG2 out of curiosity, but it actually looks like it has improved it a great deal! Or perhaps I'm just subconciously making an effort to notice a difference for the better? Either way, I"m happier with how the picture looks, so go ahead! It only takes a minute.
     
  4. LV426

    LV426
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    Lyris: If you have had to change values to get it "just right" as described then it will be better.

    If the black was too low, then dark areas of picture would be "crushed" (by why I mean, nearly-black, and fully black look the same, so you lose shadow detail).

    If the contrast was too high, white and nearly white would be similarly crushed.

    If black was too high then it would be greyer than it needs to be in dark areas.

    If contrast was too low, then the brightness of white wouldn't be as good as it could be.

    All of these possible mis-adjustments would mean you weren't getting the best out of your expensive gadget.
     

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