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picture quality from RPTV

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by dood, Sep 25, 2004.

  1. dood

    dood
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    My wife and I have been very excited about getting a new 50in RPTV as an upgrade from our standard sony 34 in TV.

    However, we are disappointed with the quality. I knew that RPTV was never going to offer the crisp clarity of a standard TV but my wife was expecting as much after all the rave comments she had heard from the sales people and friends that have gone the RPTV root. As a result the TV is going back on Monday and we've decided to stick with our 34 inch, the rationale being that clarity is more important than size. The problems are more noticeable when viewing satellite broadcasts using a composite video feed than when using a prog scan DVD player with component leads, but most of our viewing is satellite.

    In particular, the thing that bugs her most is the flicker and jagged motion. Also the dots that surround text boxes on the screen is a no-no. She is particularly sensitive to flicker and we have to use LCD computer monitors for this reason. Are these problems I have mentioned peculiar to 100Hz TVs and if so would we actually find a 50 Hz TV acceptable? We went to see a 43 in 100Hz RPTV today thinking that a smaller screen may be easier to live with but it was not to be.

    Funnily enough, when viewing a plasma TV that was twice as expensive as the 50in RPTV, the picture was much more clear but still not as good as a standard direct view CRT. The flaw that struck me was the vaseline blurring with motion. Eg the weave on a jumper wsa clearly defined when the person was still, but got blurred as soon as he moved.

    I guess these are the trade offs you get with larger screens. Is there really a solution? I've read of problems with projectors, mainly LCD ones. Are LCD TVs the answer?
     
  2. Laurel&Hardy

    Laurel&Hardy
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    What model is it?

    My 51WH36 is very crisp for a large set, especially DVD replay where it truly excels.

    How have you connected it up to your kit? The composite video feed is not a good source for any TV, especially large screen where it will show up the limitations of this input mercilessly. You have to hook up using RGB SCART or component video, although S-video is a good second choice. Look at these options before sending the TV back.
     
  3. Tight Git

    Tight Git
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    Dood,

    Apart from the different technologies involved (CRT, Plasma, LCD), a larger picture is never going to be as "clear" as a smaller one.

    It's the same as trying to get a good enlargement in photography.

    You'll always be limited by the original negative.

    Our 625 line system was developed when a 21" screen was considered large!

    What you get with a larger screen is a more impressive display overall, but the imperfections are showing if you look critically.

    Suggest you save your pennies until HDTV is introduced!
     
  4. AV Junky

    AV Junky
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    Agree with the above - composite should not even be considered on a set this size. A lot of the picture problems you describe could attributed directly to using a composite feed.

    Flicker should be better on a 100Hz set, as it is one of the main benefits. However, the digital processing needed to produce a 100Hz picture from a native 50Hz can lead to some artefacts in the picture. These are most noticable usually on fast movement.

    The quality of the image on plasmas is very much dependent on the quality of the set itself, and the feed its being given to work with. If you've ever looked at one of the 'cheapies' such as Techwood being fed with a poorly distributed RF signal in certain high street stores then you'll know what I mean.
     

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