Physics test: what temperature should an oven thermometer show in a fan oven?

rwtomkins

Active Member
I've tried everywhere to find the answer to this question and you clever folk are my last hope. Suppose you have a fan oven or circotherm oven in your kitchen. The user guide states that the effective cooking temperature is considerably higher than the actual temperature you set on the dial - so for example, if you set the dial to 180 degrees, the effective cooking temperature inside the oven is 220 degrees.

Now, suppose you don't trust the thermostat and you want to carry out a test of the oven temperature using an accurate oven thermometer. You place the thermometer inside the oven and set the dial to 180 degrees. And this is the question: if the thermostat is working correctly, should your oven thermometer now produce a reading of 180 degrees or 220 degrees?

When placed in our Neff circotherm oven, my thermometer reads the same as what I set on the dial, but this doesn't seem right to me. The thermometer should surely show the reality of what it is feeling inside the oven, and if that is an effective temperature of 220 degrees, isn't that what it should show? I'm convinced my oven is runnning too cool.
 

doopydug

Active Member
The thermometer should read what you have set the oven at if both are accurate.

The instructions you have read are stating the cooking time at a certain temp for non-fan assisted ovens. Because a fan oven blows the air over the food, it cooks more thoroughly hence the need to reduce either the cooking time or the temperature
 

u8myufo

Active Member
Well I think fan ovens are a crock of ****. we have a range cooker, twin fan oven on one side, and a conventional oven on the other. Give me the conventional side to use for a roast joint anyday. And to say a fan oven cooks things more thorough baffles me, that means I have been fed against my will uncooked food from my parents and grandparents for the last
48 years. By rights I should have popped my clogs ages ago.:thumbsup:
 

doopydug

Active Member
You weren't fed uncooked food at all. If you were, your brain would be mush and you would come out with ill-conceived sensationalist claims without really thinking about it now wouldn't you :D

It would make sense that your parents and grandparents cooked the food for the time that the technolgy of the day required.
 

neilneil

Active Member
A fan oven blows the air around the inside of the oven to make the whole oven an even temperature throughout. A conventional non fan assisted oven will have hot spots inside and generally be hotter at the top shelf than on the bottom shelf (heat rises).
Cooking our parents did was cooked in such a way that takes account of this.

-Neil
 

Mr Incredible

Distinguished Member
On the same subject of temperature, I saw this questioned posed on the TV recently:-

If today's temperature is 0 degrees, and it is going to be twice as cold tomorrow, what temperature will it be tomorrow?
 

Mr Incredible

Distinguished Member
Back to the OP's topic.

Isn't this similar and opposite to the wind chill factor? The air temperature is an absolute temperature but it "feels" colder, even though it isn't. Perhaps wind heat is what exists in the oven?!l
 

doopydug

Active Member
On the same subject of temperature, I saw this questioned posed on the TV recently:-

If today's temperature is 0 degrees, and it is going to be twice as cold tomorrow, what temperature will it be tomorrow?


The answer to your question would be to convert the 0 degrees to another scale e.g. if you are saying 0 degrees celsius, then convert it to fahrenheit, double it then convert back to celsius again or use the kelvin scale or whatever takes your fancy?
 

Mr Incredible

Distinguished Member
The answer to your question would be to convert the 0 degrees to another scale e.g. if you are saying 0 degrees celsius, then convert it to fahrenheit, double it then convert back to celsius again or use the kelvin scale or whatever takes your fancy?

So if today's temperature had been -1 degrees C and it was going to be twice as cold tomorrow, do you apply the same logic :)confused: re "double it")? Or is twice as cold -2 degrees C? And if so does this tally with the Kelvin or Fahrenheit conversion route?
 

doopydug

Active Member
If you are using 0 degrees as your benchmark and every -1 degree is colder and every +1 degree is warmer, then -2 degrees is twice as cold as -1 degree?
 

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