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Photoshop help needed

oldjohn

Active Member
open your image,make a new layer with control J,make sure the new layer is selected in the layers pallete (highlighted)

Then do your stuff with the magic wand.

John.
 

stevegreen

Distinguished Member
Here you go. I have isolated 'Mary'

Just whack it in Photoshop, do a magic wand on the plain background, select inverse, layer via cut then drag it onto a new background.

I think :D
 

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stevegreen

Distinguished Member
Many thanks Steve, but wont I need a larger file size to print off? (Don't think I mentioned that :suicide: )

grrrrrrrrrr. yes, you probably will. I think your problem might be that you are not completing the lassoo tool. You need to outline the entire part of the image that you want to seperate, ie start at the left hand shoulder, work all the way round and then along the bottom of the image, double clicking at the end. You should then be able right click and select inverse etc etc.

If you want, you can email me the large image and i'll have a go at it tomorrow for you. I'mprobably off to bed in a minute, work tomorrow and all that and I think i've probably caused enough havoc on the fourm for one night :)
 

senu

Distinguished Member
or
-

getting the hang of it now

cheers

Indeed,

One thing though is to feather your selection ( a bit to avoid very "sharp" edges) and give an unnatural look.

The relative scales of background and foreground are also impt:

For instance the lady in the image has IMHO, a too distinct outline, and seems larger then life compared to the background
But..
You are definitely getting the hang of it:)
 

tontoshorse

Well-known Member
Indeed,

One thing though is to feather your selection ( a bit to avoid very "sharp" edges) and give an unnatural look.

The relative scales of background and foreground are also impt:

For instance the lady in the image has IMHO, a too distinct outline, and seems larger then life compared to the background
But..
You are definitely getting the hang of it:)


Yes, I thought that too, at the moment tho I just want to practise!
Hopefully I'll end up with some sort of plain background and edges not too sharp.

cheers
 

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