Phillips DVDR 890 'Disc Error'

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by Jonbur, Oct 13, 2003.

  1. Jonbur

    Jonbur
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    I wonder if anyone else has experienced the same problems with the Phillips DVDR 890/80?


    It appears that after about three months usage the machine develops a problem where 'disc-warning' and then 'disc-error' appearing on the screen. The machine then tells you the disc contains 'unknown data' and can now be thrown in the bin. At about £3 a disc this becomes expensive but also infuriating as recordings made earlier in the disc are also lost. I wonder home many people have lost precious family events recorded on to this wonderful new medium from their camcorders.

    I purchased my first 890 in November of last year. By February the problem was appearing. Waited 3-4 weeks for repair. By June the problem was back. However I was then burgled in June and was therefore able to replace my ‘Friday Afternoon’ machine. So pleased was I with the general performance, other than the obvious, I purchased another DVDR 890 last June.

    Two weeks ago, same old problem. I did contact Philips cusomers service who showed complete indifference. This is obviously a flawed system and flawed product that should have been withdrawn from sale, but Philips seemed to have covered it up. You can forget getting any sympathy from Philips they just don't care!
     
  2. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Hi

    You have experienced what many other people have. The Philips machines are prone to these problems and, as you have found, you will be better off with another make altogether.

    Go to http://www.dvdplusrw.org/cgi/forum/ikonboard.cgi?s=;act=SF;f=4 and see that you are not alone. The site itself is very pro +RW and Philips (its a promotional thing), so try and avoid it talking you into having another Philips. ;)

    Regards

    Philip
     
  3. MATTHEW

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    Had similar problems with the 880.So changed to the Sony RDRG-X7.
    So far so good and a much better build quality
     
  4. VFRSE7

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    Same thing happened to my 890 after a similar time period. Don't persevere with it and demand that it should be exchanged. Sevenoaks Sound & Vision swapped it for the newer DVDR-75 which has the same features, is smaller and none of the problems.
     
  5. Jonbur

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    Thanks for your replies. I will now persue Philips directly to get them to rectify the situation.

    Any further replies graetfully received as amunition in my case.

    Thanks again
     
  6. djnsh

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    Hi - I have just come across this thread by chance however feel I need to stick up for the DVDR890 in regard to this problem! In my opinion I have had no problems what so ever which I have not been able to cure myself.

    However I have had the problem people here state only with unfinalised DVD+R discs which I assume you all are having problems.

    One remedy I have found which always works for me if this problem occurs is to take the troubled disc out of the machine and insert a finalised DVD+R disc which is known to work. If read successfully remove, then reinsert the problem disc which should now be readable.

    However where this option has not worked a gentle wipe of the surface from the centre out can also help as the critical section the player needs to read is the centre where the table of contents will be located when finalised. Any dirt may lead to miss readings of the disc surface and hence trick the machine into errors.

    Note: Care must also be taken when inserting the disc back into the case. One must be careful not to catch the inner section of the disc surface on the hub of the case as this could irreparably damage the inner section and truly render the disc useless. I am assuming you are all handling the discs correctly. The surface of any optical disc should never be touch - only the outer edge should ever be handled.

    Trying a combination of these cures has always worked for me on the rare occasions it has happened. Furthermore I would strongly advise that all DVD+R discs should be finalised as soon as possible - especially recordings of treasured moments. Once finalised reliability should be the same as any other recordable disc.
     
  7. Jonbur

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    djnsh

    Thanks, some useful tips.

    However, there is no way of getting back information from a disc with 'unknown data' coming up on the screen.

    I also think there is real problem when you have to treat a media like a priceless artefact. CDs and prerecorded DVDs seem to cope fine with all sorts of abuse
     
  8. djnsh

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    Handling of any optical media has been a discussion I have had over many years stemming back to when Laser Disc was first launched in the 1980's.

    If any disc, be it CD ROM, CD, especially all derivatives of DVD (not the caddy variety obviously) are needed to be kept for years - I mean 20 years plus which most people already have in their collection as CD has been around at least that long, care must be taken. The second scratches are introduced to the surface, dust will gather, grease will gather and very quickly the discs will be useless.

    Most discs from movie rental companies are often hired with the playing surface in shocking condition - it amazes me how any of them play at all. Recordable DVD is even more sensitive as is CD-R for music.

    Believe me - it takes very little effort to simply replace the disc back in its case after use. The journey the disc should only ever make is from the case to the recorder/player and back holding by the edges - if this action is taken I wouldn't be surprised if the discs last the life time of the format in use. Definitely at least 20 years.
     
  9. Jonbur

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    Sometimes mine don't last from the case to machine and back again without errors.
     
  10. PhilipL

    PhilipL
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    Yet ;)

    DVD Video has much better error correction than CD Audio, it will survive more damage, and is why you have seen them in shocking condition and yet they play perfectly. The same error correction is part of recordable DVDs.

    I understand you are trying to stick up for “Philips”, but suggesting the blame is with the owners isn’t helpful and is making excuses for the manufacturer. If handling damage were the case then we would see exactly the same list of complaints and problems for those using DVD-R/RW/RAM, but we don’t.

    It doesn’t matter how you put it, those with any common sense will realise the constant reports of the “same” problems, that often come back on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd or more repairs or complete replacements are indicative of a very serious quality issue with Philips +RW recorders. Philips doesn’t sell their system as being ultra sensitive and to “handle with extreme care”, but promotes +RW as a VCR replacement. The average family should be able handle +RW/+R like any other disc and expect it to work as a VCR replacement, and not something that is constantly giving errors.

    Regards

    Philip
     
  11. VFRSE7

    VFRSE7
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    Yes PhilipL, you are right that there have been problems with the earlier Philips models, especially the 880 & 890, and yes, this is inexcusable. However I would stick up for the DVDR75 which I have been using regularly to record television programmes and archiving my camcorder with no such problems, and the RW discs work seamlessly with my NEC 1100 dvd re-writer to make further DVD copies of my Hi8 tapes.

    Would I buy +RW again? No, but then again I wouldn't buy -RW either. Multi-format machines with hard drives are the future while we all save up for Blu-Ray.
     
  12. Ged

    Ged
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    Would I buy +RW again? No, but then again I wouldn't buy -RW either. Multi-format machines with hard drives are the future while we all save up for Blu-Ray. [/B][/QUOTE]

    Tend to agree, I really think once record discs are missing the point.
     
  13. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    HDD/DVDR combos are indeed the future. Not sure they HAVE to be multi-format though - IMHO this just makes them expensive without necessarily adding functionality that benefits the user. None of the DVDR formats are going to disappear before BluRay becomes the 'norm' so why pay to record to a variety of disks?

    I don't doubt when BluRay arrives in 18-24 months that will soon become the "Home Cinema" defacto standard within a short space of time.

    Why? I think they are fantastic. Any re-writeable format that attempts backwads compatibility is always going to be a compromise between compatibility and new features. The +VR recording format is a perfect example. Better to offer a totally new re-recording format (BluRay) which offers new features but is not that compatible whilst offering compatible write-once media (DVD-R) for situations where people want to share.

    Write-Once media is out-selling re-writeable media 4:1 so most peope obviously find this acceptable. It's also the way most people have gone in the CDR world.
     
  14. Ged

    Ged
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    True, but I think that is because the material copied to it is does not carry anything you would like to delete as it a one to one copy.
    A RW disc will let you cut out the ads or re record if you get bored etc. It will also save me a mountain of R whilst I get usd to the PC.
     
  15. Rasczak

    Rasczak
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    As a general rule whilst 'learning' about menu design etc it is far quicker to output as a DVD-Video 'Title Set' to the PC's HDD and test in a programme like WinDVD rather than waste time burning to a disk. You'll save yourself hours as you can check all the important things; buttons work correctly, lip-sync, menus display properly etc.
     
  16. Jonbur

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    I think most people use DVD R discs to record films from Sky (no ads) the fact that they are a third of the price of RW and you can now pick them up so cheaply at Rambox etc.

    Obviously with VHS there was no way of knowing how many tapes were taped on once and then archived forever, probably quite alot if the statistic above is anything to go by.

    I have a Tivo and DVDR 890 which apart from the obvious DVDR 890 problems is pretty much the ideal way for archiving fave programmes, particuarlly if stunning picture quality and 5:1 sound is not an issue such as only fools and horses etc.
     
  17. Rindless

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    The 890 is not a perfect machine but does a cracking job if you 'get it right'.

    Firstly a firmware upgrade is a good start.

    Next you should use DVD+R media that works well and stick to it.
    (I've had the 'disc error' problem too but with specific brands only)

    A cold start is not a good idea. Place a retail dvd in the machine for a few minutes and then do your recordings.

    Like djnsh said in his post, it's best to finalize your recording as soon a possible.

    Good luck.
     
  18. Easy2BCheesy

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    These Disc Error problems are widely reported faults. I would not recommend a firmware update unless you are having problems (ie you have nothing to lose). I've read my posts on the DVD+RW forum about people who've upgraded the firmware and knackered their machines.

    Oh and djnsh - some nice tips there but a) there are none of these problems with the Sony or the Panasonic recorders and b) if it's not a problem with the machine, how come Philips replace the optical assembly as a matter of course when any 880/890 is returned to them?

    If I could go back in time, I'd certainly go for a Panny recorder, even though the flexibility and compatibility of DVD+RW has been very beneficial for me...
     

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