1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Philips Widescreen colour purity coverup?

Discussion in 'TVs' started by andynz, Sep 29, 2002.

  1. andynz

    andynz
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I have recently been through a very disapointing experience whilst buying a Philips Widescreen 32PW9556 in New Zealand (as it turns out, the problems relate to other models in the Philips Widescreen range).

    The first TV had colour blotching or purity errors in the bottom right corner. Noticable to the point of maling any white graphics yellow. There were smaller errors on the other edges and an overall dimming of the image towards to outer edge. Philips eventually agreed to the service agent coming out to look at it. A deguass did not really help so a "kit" was installed, basically purity rings and some stick on magnets. It made the blotch less noticable but moved the fault to an overall colour change from screen left to right.

    In the end, the store I purchased it from replaced it with another new TV. Same fault, only worse. The service guy agreed that it was pretty bad and that it didn't relate to anything in or around the house causing a magnetic field. Even more interesting was that the user accesable picture rotate could get rid of the purity error by tipping the image up on one side; fixing one fault caused another. There seems to be something seriously wrong with the design of the Philips Widescreen scan circuit.

    My total disolusionment with Philips TV's has meant I am in the process of getting my money back.

    The interesting point about this story is that when I went in to my local shop last Friday, there were about 10 models of Widescreen TV on show, 5 were Philips and ALL had colour blotching on the right lower side and to a lesser extent, elsewhere. All had the dimming of the image to the edges. This included a new "Pixel Plus" model. None of the other models LG, Sony, Panasonic had the problem. The assistant in the shop said, "your right, that is pretty bad".

    Philips New Zealand seem to have taken little interest throughout this bad experience and I have been left feeling like it is my problem.

    My question is, does Philips have a design problem with it's widescreen chasis? Why would all the Philips Widescreens in a shop have the same problem but not the other manufacturers?

    If you had a design problem with a TV you maufactured, how would you handle it? Having pumped money into R&D and production would you put the range out anyway and hope no one notices?

    Would be interested to hear from anyone else who has had a similar experience.

    Andy
    Auckland NZ
     
  2. Plump

    Plump
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2002
    Messages:
    636
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    19
    Location:
    under the bridge
    Ratings:
    +0
    Hi Andy
    There are the problems with other manufacturers too.
    I heard or read by now for every single brand having frequent purity problems.
    Only LOEWE not, but I guess they will have it too. It is not so easy to make 16:9 tube, that is the reason. That's why it is still too early to buy widescreen TV
    I had to swap two Pannys and one Philips until I got one without purity or geometrical problems. Last week I used test picture from my TAG DVD to set geometry correctly on my Philips over service codes set and it was not possible to do it 100%

    Also Plasmas and rear projectors have burn-in problems and CRT TVs purity and geometry.
    The problem is that I had no patience to wait couple of years more. Stupid me!

    Sad but true!

    Regards to down under
     
  3. Fox E

    Fox E
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Yesterday I went to a local Christchurch (NZ) retailer to look at the first 32PW9617 (pixel +) and lo and behold a big yellow blotch in the lower left corner and the screen tilted by at least 15mm to the right - straight out of the box!! I got the usual patter about switching it off at the set to degauss it and after a week or so it should be gone - yeah, right (heard it all before with my last Sony).

    The retailer actually had it delivered from the store and unpacked it in front of me - so it appears that is the way that Philips 'quality' is (but see below for mitigating circumstances)!!

    The tilt was able to be corrected through the tilt adjust menu but then the top of the screen started to show a slight sag. Very disappointing as I had been waiting for some weeks to see the first pixel plus. At least by following this forum I knew that there were problems like this to look out for.

    Now I'm seriously looking at the 32FD9944 Plasma solely because at least these don't have geometry or colour problems.

    So, you are not alone. I suspect that the long journey 'down under' probably accounts for most of the colour impurities as they must go through literally dozens of hands in the process - some not so careful (they are heavy machines!).

    Cheers!
     
  4. andynz

    andynz
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Glad to hear that I am not alone in finding basic problems with widescreen TV's. I almost believed the marketing hype!

    I had the same experience with the new Pixel Plus TV. The shop unpacked it for me telling me that it was a new design and as I mentioned, it had exactly the same problem!

    Is it really ok for companies like Philips etc to be advertising the perfect picture when it quite simply isn't? Isn't this a contravention of the consumer protection act? Should Philips be getting away with it?

    On a postitive note, having seen the new high pixel Sony Plasma, the picture quality outshines just about anything I have seen, so I'll be saving up.

    Andy


     
  5. LV426

    LV426
    Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2000
    Messages:
    12,844
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Somewhere in South Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +5,078
    The problem described is not peculiar to any one manufacturer, nor to widescreen TVs exclusively. The problem is with the Dinosaur we call the Cathode Ray Tube.

    The sooner all TVs are made from Plasma, LCD, LED or something else (and are cost-effective at the same time)........the better.
     
  6. andynz

    andynz
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Thanks for your comments Ed. I know it is a problem with CRT's, the bigger the more of a problem, but the past couple of weeks suggest that some manufacturers are better at compensating or allowing for purity errors than others.

    The more shops I go into, the more the problem is MAINLY Philips widescreens.

    Maybe the design didn't allow for the southern hemisphere's magnetic field:)

    Cheers
    Andy
     
  7. bobby1

    bobby1
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    My brand new Philips was delivered just a week ago and I was very dissapointed to see that in the bottom right hand corner there was a significant yellow blotch.

    30 minutes ago, my TV was picked up by the service people to see what they could do. I just rang Bond and Bond to discuss my options. I said I don't what my new set to be repaired, I just want a new set. They have agreed.
     

Share This Page

Loading...