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Philips Cybertube+ SuperSlim

Discussion in 'TVs' started by Hasse, Aug 25, 2003.

  1. Hasse

    Hasse
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    LG.Philips Displays informs more in a new pressrelease on their site:

    LG.Philips Displays

    Interresting facts:

    "To be launched is the company’s prototype Cybertube+ SuperSlim 32” widescreen CPT that boasts of a 30 percent depth reduction. It measures only 35 cms from front to back and features a glass envelope that has a significantly shallower profile"

    They have a 36" in pipeline too.

    :)
     
  2. They

    They
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    The 36" version won't be produced. Apparently it's not economically viable.
     
  3. John-W

    John-W
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    Further to speculation over the last couple of years, LG.Philips are actually preparing to produce Cybertube+ Superslim (short neck) CRTs in 2005!

    This technology will make all current 'monster' widescreen CRT receivers obsolete. And what effect will this have on the flat panel market?

    Pity they're not produced in the Durham UK plant where I believe they were designed and prototyped.

    See:

    http://www.homecinemachoice.com/cgi-bin/shownews.php?id=7974

    www.superslim.com
     
  4. Eiji

    Eiji
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    Isn't this the same tube used in the new LG Super-Slim CRT HDTVs that are coming out soon in the US but are already out in Korea?
     
  5. TV Headache

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    I think not. They'll have to compromise the picture quality to make the neck shorter. There was a reason why CRTs were long at the back and this is because it's harder to focus the electron beam at the corners, and get the geometry right with a short neck.

    I don't think Sharp need to panic just yet. The Samsung 32" with a similar type of CRT to LG-Philips is nearly 40cm deep and bloody heavy. When you look at it next to a 'conventional' CRT you'll see that 'superslim' is a complete misnomer because despite the clever styling, there's little difference. You'll certainly never wall-hang a short neck CRT!
     
  6. John-W

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    I do think SuperSlim CRT receivers will be popular!

    I agree that they will not be wall-mountable. However, I suggest that only a minority of TV consumers actually have a room layout allowing viewing on a flat wall. In reality flat wall/home cinema technology is only taken up by a very small percentage of the millions of 'average' TV consumers. The vast majority of the millions of homes in the UK (myself included) have a traditional corner-of-room TV location, and many cannot even accommodate a screen size above 28" due to the sheer bulk of current widescreen receivers. Also, a true flat panel receiver offers little space saving when located in the corner of a room.

    So, if the prices are competitive with LCD/plasma panel TVs, this is the mass market that SuperSlim CRT receivers will benefit!

    I do agree about picture geometry and focus concerns with even greater deflection angles - we'll have to see if they have achieved adequate geometry performance.

    But I accept that even the current generation of widescreen CRTs has problems achieving reasonable geometry, especially due to poor quality control on final alignment. I speak from experience of my current TV - Panasonic TX32-PD50! See...

    www.avforums.com/forums/showthread.php?p=1492887#post1492887
     

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