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Question Philips 50PUS7303/12 HDR support

mrknvk

Novice Member
I'm thinking about buying this TV but I'm a bit confused about the HDR support. Every review has different HDR specs for this TV, so far I've found everything from HDR up to HDR10+. The official Philips website (I'm not from the UK) says it has " HDR Plus " but under the specifications the only thing that mentions HDR is the HDMI ports " up to 4K UHD 3840 x 2160 @60 Hz - HDR supported, HDR10/HLG ".

Which HDR version/s does it have?
What's the difference between HDR, HDR Plus, HDR10, HDR10 Plus?
If the TV has " HDR Plus " and " HDR10 ", does it still support normal HDR for the PS4 Pro?
Is it a good TV or should I stay away from it?

Thank you in advance :)
 

Mane UK

Active Member
I'll try and keep it simple.

HDR10 is the standard for HDR. This is tv does accept an hdr10 input and will show Playstation and Xbox games in HDR. Also UHD blu-ray and streaming have hdr10 base layers associated their standards. Any TV labelled HDR accepts HDR10

HLG is the broadcast standard for HDR (developed by NHK & BBC) which combines the old SDR and new HDR in such a way that its a much smaller signal to transmit. BBC iplayer uses this. (it stands for hybrid log gamma, log being the old system gamma being the new)

Hdr10+ is an enhanced version of hdr10 with 'dynamic metadata' which means that it can adapt overall range on a scene-by-scene basis. (i think hdr plus is just another name for this but I could be wrong about that)

Why is dynamic metadata desirable? Well, they whole point is to increase detail in dark and bright scenes to better match what you see in real life, there is a thing called HDR Premium certification which is for screens with an above average dynamic range bit these are more expensive. Most HDR sets still have a limited dynamic range compared with the source material. So if the TV has a dynamic range of 500 but the source is 0 to 1000 then the gamma curve without metadata has to be set for the the whole movie at the start, and you lose detail because it's 1:2 (it would actually clip in a non-linear way but I'm trying to keep it simple!). But with dynamic metadata a dark scene can set to map dark bits in the range of the TV (showing the 0 to 500) and a bright scene can slide the overall brightness way up so that it would lose dark detail but gains lots of bright detail (showing 500 to 1000).

This isn't really how it works, but it's the best way for people to visualises it I've found. It's like how your eyes get used to a dark room.

Dynamic metadata is desirable in theory but the results vary wildly out in the real world.

TL;DR: HDR10 and HLG are the ones you need for games, movies, and broadcast TV right now, anything else is a bonus.
 

mrknvk

Novice Member
Is this of any help Philips 2018 TV line-up - full overview - FlatpanelsHD I am pleased with the tv, guess its all about performance against price.

That's exactly the site that confused me the most, at the top it shows that 7803 7503 7303 don't have HDR10+, but scrolling down it says "HDR: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG" next to all of them. Since you mentioned that you're pleased with it I assume that you have it? May I ask you if there is any clouding?

I'll try and keep it simple.

HDR10 is the standard for HDR. This is tv does accept an hdr10 input and will show Playstation and Xbox games in HDR. Also UHD blu-ray and streaming have hdr10 base layers associated their standards. Any TV labelled HDR accepts HDR10

HLG is the broadcast standard for HDR (developed by NHK & BBC) which combines the old SDR and new HDR in such a way that its a much smaller signal to transmit. BBC iplayer uses this. (it stands for hybrid log gamma, log being the old system gamma being the new)

Hdr10+ is an enhanced version of hdr10 with 'dynamic metadata' which means that it can adapt overall range on a scene-by-scene basis. (i think hdr plus is just another name for this but I could be wrong about that)

Why is dynamic metadata desirable? Well, they whole point is to increase detail in dark and bright scenes to better match what you see in real life, there is a thing called HDR Premium certification which is for screens with an above average dynamic range bit these are more expensive. Most HDR sets still have a limited dynamic range compared with the source material. So if the TV has a dynamic range of 500 but the source is 0 to 1000 then the gamma curve without metadata has to be set for the the whole movie at the start, and you lose detail because it's 1:2 (it would actually clip in a non-linear way but I'm trying to keep it simple!). But with dynamic metadata a dark scene can set to map dark bits in the range of the TV (showing the 0 to 500) and a bright scene can slide the overall brightness way up so that it would lose dark detail but gains lots of bright detail (showing 500 to 1000).

This isn't really how it works, but it's the best way for people to visualises it I've found. It's like how your eyes get used to a dark room.

Dynamic metadata is desirable in theory but the results vary wildly out in the real world.

TL;DR: HDR10 and HLG are the ones you need for games, movies, and broadcast TV right now, anything else is a bonus.

Thank you that's what I needed. I've contacted Philips and asked on some other forums but no one seems to have an answer or explanation to that " HDR Plus ".
 

worcesterglen

Standard Member
HDR Plus  (TV menu) >  Settings > Picture > Advanced > Contrast > HDR plus. Select HDR Plus for superior contrast and brightness effect. Note: Available when HDR (High-Dynamic Range) signal is detected. (taken from the manual but not sure if that clears it up if its HDR+10)
I watch a lot of sport and have not noticed clouding spoiling the picture. I do not know how other TV's compare at this price point but 4k hdr picture is for me very good.
 

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