Philips 42pfl9803 Led Backlight 2.000.000:1 Contrast

ChrisGgr

Member
The first LED backlight 42" lcd tv by philips.So far the info is from a greek blog,I give the link and anyone who wants further information rather than the specs which are visible withought the need for translation,I will translate
http://www.fullhd.gr/blog/2008/05/18/philips-42pfl9803/



 

Widge

Well-known Member
This sounds wonderful, shame nothing under 42" announced though.

For a LED backlight, I'd happily sell my 9632 to upgrade. Esp if its got all the 9603 technology in it.
 

Mackem

Novice Member
It's all Greek to me :)
When's it due out or is this just a 'concept' at the moment?
 

skyform

Well-known Member
So this means that it will be possible to set the backlight manual, if yes well then this is awesome because that's what the Philips TV's where lacking so far but why only in 42", i would but this baby if it would be in 32":(
 

ChrisGgr

Member
Yeah a greek forum mate said its coming in september
 

jah

Active Member
Not sure I can wait until September though. Going stir crazy watching my portable telly:(.

Cheers,

jah
 

Kamakazie

Active Member
So this means that it will be possible to set the backlight manual, if yes well then this is awesome because that's what the Philips TV's where lacking so far but why only in 42", i would but this baby if it would be in 32":(
I think it is probably limited to 42" by the LED backlight. It is probably that bit too small to get a reasonable amount of LEDs in there to offer a bright, even spread.
I want one now but it is gonna be way too expensive no doubt.
 

Suave

Distinguished Member
the measurement of 2 million to 1 it's like a bad joke :rotfl:
Hi,

Obviously you do not understand anything at all about how Philips works or quotes - it's simple really, it means 2 million faults and/or issues for every one or the only one that works correctly - hope that is clear!

Suave!
 

Razor

Member
Hi,

Obviously you do not understand anything at all about how Philips works or quotes - it's simple really, it means 2 million faults and/or issues for every one or the only one that works correctly - hope that is clear!

Suave!
:rotfl:
 

Phill1978

Novice Member
Is thre any other brands who are pushing 46/47" sets this year with LED tech ?

im sure philips will bring a 47" LED set :thumbsup:


(and hopefully a new menu system)
 

J0nesi

Standard Member
2 million to one dynamic contrast that is. Real contrast nearer 3000:1.
128 individual backlight LED's means that the lowest black level will be 0cd/m2 "infinite black". It's still not enough though, some light bleeding will occur with real world sd/hd content.

Still this is a small improvement over Samsung F96 series.
 

andrewfee

Novice Member
128 individual backlight LED's means that the lowest black level will be 0cd/m2 "infinite black". It's still not enough though, some light bleeding will occur with real world sd/hd content.
Due to the way LED backlighting works, each segment has to be diffused to provide even lighting over the image, otherwise you would see a grid effect if they were sectioned off entirely. This means that when a bright area is next to a dark one, contrast drops towards the panel's ‘native’ contrast ratio. So even though LED local dimming can improve it, you still want as high a native contrast ratio as possible.

This looks like it's going to be one of the smallest LED backlit televisions released this year, but there doesn't seem to be any mention of whether they're using white LEDs or an RGB mix.

Having had a quick look through the manual, I can't believe Philips still doesn't offer a backlight control in the picture settings though. :suicide:
 

Tech Man

Novice Member
Even though I'm a fan of Philips (well their flagship TVs), I confident this will be a great TV. They have a lot experience with LEDs - They manufacture them!!

I'm liking the set depth. Only 108mm. That's +8mm from the EEFL sets (LED sets from SONY and LG a rather chunkier)

+ only 201 watts.

I can't wait to get my hands on this!
 

LiquidB

Novice Member
Due to the way LED backlighting works, each segment has to be diffused to provide even lighting over the image, otherwise you would see a grid effect if they were sectioned off entirely. This means that when a bright area is next to a dark one, contrast drops towards the panel's ‘native’ contrast ratio. So even though LED local dimming can improve it, you still want as high a native contrast ratio as possible.


Having had a quick look through the manual, I can't believe Philips still doesn't offer a backlight control in the picture settings though. :suicide:
First of all, the black levels are awesome when you see the 2D Dimming working. Any light leakage is only hardly noticeable and far better than expected.

And as for Backlight control: Philips offers a backlight control when you change 'contrast'. This is present in their products for already a few years I believe. I saw it during a demo a few years ago and now again on the 9803.
It should be present in all 9000 series.
 

andrewfee

Novice Member
And as for Backlight control: Philips offers a backlight control when you change 'contrast'. This is present in their products for already a few years I believe. I saw it during a demo a few years ago and now again on the 9803.
It should be present in all 9000 series.
The manual specifically states that adjusting contrast has no effect on black level?

http://www.p4c.philips.com/files/4/42pfl9803h_10/42pfl9803h_10_dfu_eng.pdf said:
• Contrast
Changes the level of bright parts in the picture but keeps the dark parts unchanged.
 

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