phase switch and left ear boom

Discussion in 'Subwoofers' started by anth1e, Sep 2, 2007.

  1. anth1e

    anth1e
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    i have my speaker on the right side of the room facing the left and from my listening position the bass seems to boom in one ear louder than the other, this disappeared when i changed the phase to 180 - have i done the right thing?
    i also have a question out of curiosity, is there any advantage to floorstanders over bookshelves when all speakers are set to small and lfe anyway
     
  2. The Spaniard

    The Spaniard
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    changing the phase from 0 to 180 means that the sub is now working out of phase with the main speakers. The 0 setting is in phase with the main speakers. The general advice is to play around with both options to see which gives you the better sound so if it sounds better to you out of phase then I would leave it at that. There is no right or wrong setting. Thats the practice - I dont have a clue about the theory :D

    You would have thought that one particular setting was advised and to the layman I would have thought in phase as this seem to imply the output of the Low frequencies at the same time as all of the others???

    Come on Russ - Whats the theory?
     
  3. chrisgeary

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    0 may or may not be in phase with the main speakers.. it depends which "phase" they are in to start with. things like the delay control, speaker cable alignment etc all affect phase. but you are essentially right. as to which is correct, well you are usually looking for the setting that produces the most bass output. once you have that, at your listening position you may find that some bass notes are louder than others. this is your room affecting those frequencies. most of us use an equalisation device, such as the BFD or Velo SMS-1 to tame the louder frequencies.

    in answer to your last question, you usually get more speaker for your money when you buy standmounts versus floorstanders for the same money. in my case, the B&W 705 is much much better than the top of the range 600 series floorstander. when set to small, the benefit of the floorstanders extra bass response is unused anyway.

    i have experienced bass response that sounds louder in one ear and not the other. i think this is due to soundwaves running along the length of the room and my listening position being along that length, rather than being sat at the end of the room. i'm not sure there is really any way around this. others will, i'm sure, offer opinions.
     
  4. anth1e

    anth1e
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    my delay is default all round at 3 metres. my rears are 1 mtre from my ears though. i like to hear the sound of the speakers as loud from the back as at the front so have the fronts levels turned down by 2
     
  5. Member 96948

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    Hang on, distance settings have nothing to do with volume. Are you confusing your delay/distance settings with levels?

    Russell
     
  6. anth1e

    anth1e
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    no sory i was just mentioning that, i havent confused them
     
  7. Member 96948

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    :)

    I was just thinking that you, The Spaniard, and pauldarrington are suffering very similar problems. It is going to be very informative to find out what solution(s) sort you out.

    Russell
     
  8. anth1e

    anth1e
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    I managed to change my subs posistion. its now facing me and that's solved the problem. one thing ..I'm still suffering from my rear right speaker having a dimmer quieter sound than the other speakers when running test tone and I can't seem to find anything via process of elimination. it happens no matter which speaker or wire I use. is it a prob with my receiver outputting less sound to that terminal perhaps?
     
  9. chrisgeary

    chrisgeary
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    i've always used different calibration levels for my rear speakers in various rooms. i think its probably something to do with one of them being in a corner and the other being in a slightly more open space. one of them has more dampening materials next to it, the other has more reflective materials. all these factors will affect how much output a speaker will need. set your amp to output whatever you require for the listening position (as metered by an SPL meter) and dont worry too much about the level settings being the same.
     

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