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Pet Dog behaviour

dunks517

Well-known Member
Hello,

We adopted a Cocker from a breeding Kennels in November, yesterday she went back for a haircut. Since she came home again she cowers away to any raised hand and flinches at any swift movement. She won't come close to be petted Is she:

a. A bit traumatised from the experience of the haircut.

b. Scared as she may have been on receiving end of a bit of rough handling during her 6 hours at the kennels yesterday.

Are dogs normally like this after a haircut?

Duncs
 

k17chy

Distinguished Member
We have a shihtzu that gets groomed every 6 weeks and she loves it. It sounds as if you dog has been roughly handled and is a bit traumatised. you will just have to give her loads of tlc till she feels settled again. may be look for a different dog groomer :)
 
Last edited:

colin1984

Active Member
I think it's a bit off to say 'it sounds as if your dog has been roughly handled'. Like you k17chy my dog loves going to get his hair cut but I've got friends with dogs that are petrified....just like I couldn't care less about a doctor or dentist and others get so worked up that they pass out. Different folks - different strokes and all that.
 

dunks517

Well-known Member
colin1984 said:
I think it's a bit off to say 'it sounds as if your dog has been roughly handled'. Like you k17chy my dog loves going to get his hair cut but I've got friends with dogs that are petrified....just like I couldn't care less about a doctor or dentist and others get so worked up that they pass out. Different folks - different strokes and all that.

Why is it a bit off?
 

NewfieDrool

Banned
Was this her first hair cut?

Perhaps she did not enjoy it and is acting up due to the cut.
My dog hates the vets big time. In fact its a real problem so we have to go out of hours, he's muzzled and they make sure no one enters while we are there. I've even had to take him out the back door way once.
 

Miss Mandy

Moderator
I doubt its that she's been roughly handled, its more likely that she hates the kennels or hates the grooming. My current dog loves it, but my previous one didn't. He loved being brushed and pampered, but was absolutely petrified of the blow dryers, he went loopy when he heard them turn on. He was the same with our hair dryers at home and always needed some tlc to calm him down afterwards.
 

gibbsy

Moderator
Cockers are gentle souls, they can easily get upset. Being trust up and firmly handled would certainly upset them. Likewise if the coat was quite knotted brushing and combing will turn out to be very painful.

We have trimmed gundogs for over 30 years for showing and it isn't rocket science. Our present Cocker does not get shown anymore but we keep her in full coat, a well trimmed and presented Cocker looks stunning.

There are three tools you need to trim your dog yourself. A sharp scissors, a toothed thinning scissors, serrated on one side and the magic ingredient a 'Mars Coat King'. Hardest thing to do is the feet and extremely important for if the coat knots up between the toes if will make it very uncomfortable for the dog. For this you would use the sharp scissors. You would need to do the feet at least once a fortnight. For the main body of the dog including the feathers on the legs and the skirt you should use the Mars Coat King. It is so simple, just drag the Coat King alone the coat towards the tip of the hair, you cannot do any damage or indeed hurt the dog. You can also use the Coat King on the head to prevent a top knot. The thinning scissors is then used on the hocks and ears to tidy them up.

Investing a little money and an hour once or twice a month will save you hundreds at the canine trimmer, who no doubt takes the poor Cocker down to the wood. Take a white dogs coat down to the skin could lead to skin cancers, as well as keeping a dog warm in winter a summer coat is just as important to protecting the animal from the sun. Dogs keep cool in summer from panting and wetting their feet and bellies on cold water, ie, stream. Having a profuse but well groomed coat on a dog in summer does not do the dog any harm whatsoever.

Now that our girl is no longer shown she has a good brushing every morning and then some light trimming once a fortnight. If you wish I can give you detailed instructions how to trim your Cocker.

You can get a 10 blade medium Mars Coat King here:
Mars Coat Kings

Here's our girl:



Uploaded with ImageShack.us
 

dunks517

Well-known Member
gibbsy said:
Cockers are gentle souls, they can easily get upset. Being trust up and firmly handled would certainly upset them. Likewise if the coat was quite knotted brushing and combing will turn out to be very painful.

We have trimmed gundogs for over 30 years for showing and it isn't rocket science. Our present Cocker does not get shown anymore but we keep her in full coat, a well trimmed and presented Cocker looks stunning.

There are three tools you need to trim your dog yourself. A sharp scissors, a toothed thinning scissors, serrated on one side and the magic ingredient a 'Mars Coat King'. Hardest thing to do is the feet and extremely important for if the coat knots up between the toes if will make it very uncomfortable for the dog. For this you would use the sharp scissors. You would need to do the feet at least once a fortnight. For the main body of the dog including the feathers on the legs and the skirt you should use the Mars Coat King. It is so simple, just drag the Coat King alone the coat towards the tip of the hair, you cannot do any damage or indeed hurt the dog. You can also use the Coat King on the head to prevent a top knot. The thinning scissors is then used on the hocks and ears to tidy them up.

Investing a little money and an hour once or twice a month will save you hundreds at the canine trimmer, who no doubt takes the poor Cocker down to the wood. Take a white dogs coat down to the skin could lead to skin cancers, as well as keeping a dog warm in winter a summer coat is just as important to protecting the animal from the sun. Dogs keep cool in summer from panting and wetting their feet and bellies on cold water, ie, stream. Having a profuse but well groomed coat on a dog in summer does not do the dog any harm whatsoever.

Now that our girl is no longer shown she has a good brushing every morning and then some light trimming once a fortnight. If you wish I can give you detailed instructions how to trim your Cocker.

You can get a 10 blade medium Mars Coat King here:
Mars Coat Kings

Here's our girl:

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/694/118321392qin9a66kmalite.jpg/

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Thanks very much, we think she is traumatised from the cut and returning back to the kennels. We won't take her there again.

Duncs
 

liamt

Distinguished Member
I doubt its that she's been roughly handled, its more likely that she hates the kennels or hates the grooming. My current dog loves it, but my previous one didn't. He loved being brushed and pampered, but was absolutely petrified of the blow dryers, he went loopy when he heard them turn on. He was the same with our hair dryers at home and always needed some tlc to calm him down afterwards.

dogs can be very sensitive. but they are all quite different. not just breed specific either

our hates hoovers. well our hoover. she gets herself all stressed out. oddly at my inlaws she is fine and they have the exact same hoover as us (red miele cat and dog)

she is also scared of people with sticks. we think this is due to the previous owner hitting her with a stick (she is a rescue). she was scared to death of my son yesterday with a plastic golf club and he had only just got them so i know he hadnt hit her or anything

oddly our in laws dogs arent fussed at all about hoovers and they used to hoover their long haired german shep.
 

Mr.D

Distinguished Member
Had a big retriever as a kid who would shake with fear whilst being bathed. Daft thing would readily jump into the sea or rivers no problem at all.

My current one seems to be okay with it ; varies by dog just down to the personality. doesn't mean your pooch was roughly handled I would suspect most dog groomers are bigger animal lovers than most people and would refuse to groom a dog if it was terrififed.
 

nwgarratt

Distinguished Member
I have a rescue Jack Russell for 7 months now and she is still nervous. Her sister was also at the same place and she was the same.

She doesn't like people raising their arms. She will bark at anyone holding a camera. She will also sometimes cower when picking her up and will lie on her back.
 

liamt

Distinguished Member
i think rescues have more likelihood of being a bit messed up as we just dont know how they were treated before. if she is way of a raised hand im guessing she was beaten.

and for pretty tough animals (dogs in general) they can also be quite mentally fragile.

then again they can do stuff which just scars them for life. our old dog once burst a balloon and was then terrified of balloons.
 

nwgarratt

Distinguished Member
My Holly came from Ireland, either from a puppy farm or maybe a traveller. All I know is Holly was her actual name. Her tail has been docked too short. I believe docking is still legal in Ireland.
 

Egg White

Distinguished Member
yeah, I had a rescue cat around 10 years ago and it took her well over 7 months before we were able to get close to her etc - she was an indoor cat and we tried to trim her claws but no luck at all...

we had to take her to the vet and she took a good swipe at him and drew blood... we had to try again and the vet had to put her under a local anaesthetic...it was a few days later we realised that one of her front upper canine teeth were missing... :( we never took her back to that vet...
 

liamt

Distinguished Member
yeah, I had a rescue cat around 10 years ago and it took her well over 7 months before we were able to get close to her etc - she was an indoor cat and we tried to trim her claws but no luck at all...

we had to take her to the vet and she took a good swipe at him and drew blood... we had to try again and the vet had to put her under a local anaesthetic...it was a few days later we realised that one of her front upper canine teeth were missing... :( we never took her back to that vet...

are you saying the vet took the tooth out? very odd.

ours is the most affectionate dog you will ever meet. loves people (strange men not so much but a softie when she gets to know you). she is great with our son too.
 

Egg White

Distinguished Member
are you saying the vet took the tooth out? very odd.

ours is the most affectionate dog you will ever meet. loves people (strange men not so much but a softie when she gets to know you). she is great with our son too.

well, not took as in dentistry but in the tussle that may have happened when trying to clip her claws...she was a big cat (maine coon) - and she never went outside so I can't imagine how else it could have happened??
 

dunks517

Well-known Member
Well, after some digging around we have unearthed some background information. Our dog had recently been brought back from a kennels in Ireland to the kennels from where we bought here. The Irish Breeder was apparently quite violent towards his dogs and this answers the question we asked when our dog fled in terror when I was holding a large stick and is very timid.

The kennel we bought the dog from claimed all along that she had been there when in fact she had been in Ireland for just under 3 years. We were sold a line that the kennel owner had deceased and our dog had missed her breeding window. The kennel owner had died but our dog only returned from Ireland following her death, the new owners found she has a genetic disorder called 'C'(sic) and therefore sold her onto us.

The silver lining out of this is that a damaged dog has now been given a good home where she wants for nothing. We'll be visiting the kennels pretty shortly for some answers.

Duncs
 

NewfieDrool

Banned
At least she has a good home and family now. She's a lucky girl, there are so many cruel people out there its heart breaking.
 

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