performance or budget motherboard for nas??

Bangalore

Active Member
i'm building a raid 5 nas (i say building im shopping for the bits at the moment)

I've read conflicting advice when it comes to motherboards. Do i need a high performace motherboard with superfast cpu or will a budget motherboard with a steady away cpu be up to the task?

Ive heard arguements for both. The raid will be hardware based rather than software based if that makes any difference.

thanks

sam
 

MarkE19

Moderator
I recently built myself a NAS running unRAID and bought an Intel Atom motherboard/CPU and that is plenty powerful enough for a NAS. If you want the NAS to be downloading torrent files, running Squeezeserver etc etc then you might need to go for something a bit more powerful, but just for basic NAS there is no need for a high powered CPU.
Another thing to consider is that the NAS (well in my case at least) is powered on 24/7 so a higher powered CPU will cost more to run. I spec'd my NAS around low power consumption.

Mark.
 

Bangalore

Active Member
all the NAS will be used for is storing media and streaming to my dvd server and player (idyll base and link system). Its going to be running a gig network card and thats pretty much it.

is it not possible to wake-on-lan a nas??
 

MarkE19

Moderator
WOL is controlled by the BIOS of the NAS/PC so needs to be available in the BIOS setup. Also the device that will wake the NAS needs to be able to send a magic packet to tell the BIOS to wake the NAS, so the media streamer would need to be able to do this.

Mark.
 

MikeK

Well-known Member
For most home user NAS PCs, there is no need for a CPU beyond today's basic budget models - something like an Intel E3300 is more than adequate, and low power too!
Likewise, there is no real need for anything beyond a basic motherboard either - though number of SATA ports might be an issue (though these can be added very easily with low cost expansion cards).

On the subject of hardware vs software RAID, it used to be true that hardware based RAID was more preferable - however, these days it's arguably the other way round at the bottom end of the storage market! There's really no need for hardware RAID now in the relatively low performance environment of a home NAS - in many cases the cost of the RAID card is simply unwarranted for the features it gives (and the big drawback is that the RAID arrays produced are often proprietary - they won't work on anything other than that family of cards, which could be a bit of a problem 4-5 years down the line if the card goes belly up. You may struggle to find a replacement).

Many will find that the ideal solution is a software RAID based NAS , running one of the NAS options - FreeNAS, unRAID, Linux (any distro should do), Windows Home Server or even plain old Windows used with either it's own mirroring or one of the parity solutions such as FlexRAID or DisParity.
 
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Deleted member 27989

Guest
My NAS (SAN) is running off a fanless Intel D510 plenty enough speed to stream HD movies across the home. And I am running software raid, raidz on zfs exposed via iscsi. Low power silent stable and easily expandable.
 

Bangalore

Active Member
i see where your coming from with the software nas. The reason i favoured hardware over software was i read a blog where the blogger built a 8tb nas which crashed too oten to be practical. has any body else suffered issues with stability or am i just been paranoid?
 
D

Deleted member 27989

Guest
:) I don't think there is a single best answer to it - I am probably paranoid about the hardware not being available when it fails in the future and then can't access the disks. For work I have spare stock available, but don't want to spend that kind of money at home hence software based.

Mine is fanless in a 1U enclosure with 4 disks each, no issue with stability on OpenSolaris.
 

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