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performance inscrease with ddr2100 -> ddr2700?

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by H4r7y, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. H4r7y

    H4r7y
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    is there much benefit from upgrading the ram?
    ive got a 2600 333 but only got 266 ram, obviously id be able to run the cpu at its proper speed, but i dont know if the ram will make a noticable difference.
     
  2. KraGorn

    KraGorn
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    I'd be amazed if you noticed any difference at all, unless you're using some very, very data-intensive application such as video processing, and even then something more than FFDSHOW re-sizing. Coupled with some OC-ing of the CPU then you may be able to eke out a few more spare CPU cycles, but to what benefit? :)


    [edit]

    This comment was wrong, but makes no difference to my conclusion:
    "If you're not at 100% CPU load now I'd say it's a waste of time."
     
  3. H4r7y

    H4r7y
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    thanks for that kragorn, but i would need it to run the cpu at its stock speed though, so thats the only advantage of getting the faster stuff then?
    :)
     
  4. KraGorn

    KraGorn
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    In practice yes. The basic idea is that the faster the memory the more bytes per second the CPU can access, however we're talking massive amounts of memory and simply moving that from 'a' to 'b' doesn't generally achieve anything useful, for that the CPU has to do some processing on it. As soon as that happens the memory speed becomes far less important that the processor speed in determining where bottle-necks occur.

    Sure, if your system is 100% loaded all of the time and your application is number-crunching using massive data arrays then speeding up memory means being able to process more number per unit time, but in a desktop system or even an HTPC with a moderate amount of image processing the data volumes just aren't sufficient for the speed increased to be noticeable.
     

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