1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

pci-e graphics cards and psu limitations

Discussion in 'PC Gaming & Rigs' started by didsmith, Sep 18, 2005.

  1. didsmith

    didsmith
    Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2004
    Messages:
    166
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +5
    hi chaps,

    need help in determining what my psu ouput rating is (dell dimension 5000) and if i will need to upgrade it when i rip out my ati x300se and replace it with something more meaty. I have heard that upgrading to some of the latest cards you need to keep a careful eye and the power drain they can cause. can anyone recommend
    1) a downloadable tool to determine what my psu is and what's it's rating
    2) what pci-e cards wont cause a massive drain on my existing psu

    many,many thks for any helpers
     
  2. InsertNameHere

    InsertNameHere
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2003
    Messages:
    263
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +3
    Hi

    On Dell's website you can view / download documentation for your computer. As for the specs they can be found here:

    http://support.euro.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim5000/en/sm/specs0.htm#wp1052310

    You'll see that under 'Power' you have a rating of 305W listed. From what I've heard Dell rate their PSU's quite conservatively and provide an average rather than peak wattage. However, the best way to determine the best / fastest card you can get is to either look on the Dell forums to see what other people have successfully upgraded to or try to remember what cards were available when you ordered the system - probably a Radeon X800 Pro.

    If you're after a Nvidia card, then you'll probably be looking at buying a new power supply. You have two options here:

    1) Buy a PSU from PC Power and Cooling (based in America). They make special units for Dell machines so you can quickly and easily pull out the old one and replace with a new one. It's VERY costly though since it's shipped from America and faces VAT and duty charges.

    2) Buy an ATX PSU (from Antec, Enermax etc), preferably rated 480W or higher, and strip out your case and cut a hole at the back (a dremel would be easiest) to accommodate the on / off switch. This obviously requires a bit more patience and skill.

    When I had to do this on a Dell machine, I chose the second option.

    Just a note / warning: For people reading this, don't assume the second option can be done with all Dell computers. The 5000 series is fine but for older machine's ALWAYS check the wiring of the existing PSU. They used to have proprietary units where the wiring was completely different to standard ATX units. This meant if someone was to replace the PSU on one of these machine's you'll get a firework display with flames shooting out the back! (...I'm not joking). The ATX supply was essentially sending the wrong voltages to certain parts of the motherboard. Thankfully though this information wasn't gained from personal experience...

    Alex
     
  3. didsmith

    didsmith
    Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2004
    Messages:
    166
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +5
    this is excellent advice and i thank you
     

Share This Page

Loading...