PC won't switch on?

Kuro7

Active Member
Hi there, just recently bought a computer from PC World - i'd say 4-6 months ago maybe. It was on overnight as i personally remember seeing the lights on it as i walked in the room it is in. However, in the morning, when my dad tried using it - it wouldn't turn on? I'm sure i've got insurance on it...free guarantee anyway however that means me finding the receipt which will be done, but just not yet :D - Just wanted to know what could be done in order to get it up ad running again before i call because it's nothing to do with the power plug since everything else plugged in is working..it could be the HD gone or something wrong with the CPU? - Just a heads up, i'm not such a techhead but i will try my best to understand! Specs are: 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Quad processor with 4gb RAM and 640gb Hardrive. - It's a Packard Bell running on Windows Vista with HDMI etc.
Appreciate all the feedback i can get,
Thank you.
 

vinhmac

Novice Member
when you press the power button does anything happen?

is there any light indicator behind the pc to show its getting power?
 

vinhmac

Novice Member
Not sure if this will void your warranty but if your motherboard is recieving power there will normally be a little light inside, i'd say look at either the power cable or the psu.

one is obvisouly easier to replace then the other so you'd want to be sure.
 

Kuro7

Active Member
Yeah i thought PSU could be a problem since those are mainly the first things to go - However, majority of the techniques involves me opening up the computer which will probably void the warranty so i'm just scouting around to find anything else before i resort to phoning 'them'
 

Kuro7

Active Member
Hahaha i know - hence i'm here to ask for your thoughts and opinions haha - any suggestions on what i could do?
 

JayPH

Novice Member
Hi Chohan

Easiest solution. Blame your Dad. Make him Pay ;)

First check the really obvious things. Try a different power lead if you have one.

Some computers I have used over the years also have a small switch on the back of the case close to where the power lead goes in, so make sure it's on.

This happened to me a few years back when I had just got a new PC from Dell. I clicked on the power and nothing. Dead as a door nail. I phoned Dell support and I can't remember the exact process we went through but she definately asked me to remove the memory modules, sound card and graphics card and by the time I plugged it all back in it was fine.

She said it was somthing to do with static. Sorry this is a lame explanation but I'm sure some of the vets here will be able to explain why that worked.

I know you aren't techy but you could try opening the case and making sure all the cards are seated firmly in place and blow any dust away.

If you really don't fancy it I would phone the PC World support team and see if there are any known issues.

Good luck
 

Badger0-0

Member
However, majority of the techniques involves me opening up the computer which will probably void the warranty
You can open it no problem without voiding the warranty, 100 %.

That's why they explain how to change the HDD and processor etc in the manual :smashin:

Not that it matters, as I'd guess the PSU too, although I'd at least check the fuse in the mains plug.

it's nothing to do with the power plug since everything else plugged in is working
That doesn't matter. You still need to check the fuse in the comp's mains lead.
 

Kuro7

Active Member
The fuse seems fine to be honest. The 'power wire' is the same as PlayStation 3's wire and since i have 2, I tried them both - it still didn't start.
 

Badger0-0

Member
Ah, fair enough :smashin:

Seeing as you don't have sufficient knowledge yet, I'd say it's best to just call in the warranty.
 

Kuro7

Active Member
Yeah i'm guessing you right to be honest - My brother is the techhead of the house and to be honest, i've told him about it and he said he will check it out. Knowing him, he'll say ring the people and see what happens but to be honest, i probably trust my brother than those 'techguys' haha :p
 

Starsky

Novice Member
Seen THIS thread?
PC World, Packard Bell, PC died while left on overnight.
I wonder if like me you have a power supply vastly under-rated for the system. It was a 250W in my case.
 

spyder viewer

Well-known Member
Seen THIS thread?
PC World, Packard Bell, PC died while left on overnight.
I wonder if like me you have a power supply vastly under-rated for the system. It was a 250W in my case.
Now that's interesting Kry0genik, because if the computer has failed because of a faulty design then normal guarantee limits don't apply. I'll look things up and we'll continue on your own thread.
 

FireKracker

Active Member
Normally I'd say rip the case open, give us your system specs and lets try and diagnose your problem however with a shop brought PC, things are a little different.

My general thoughts on this would be to contact PC World, after all you brought a product from them in good faith that it would be suitable for the job intended - and it isn't. If you start opening cases, poking and prodding around then you're going to void your warranty - they're hot on that one.

An example would be: if you brought a fridge/freezer from Dixons and it went wrong, you wouldn't start poking around the inside of the fridge/freezer you'd contact Dixons for it to be fixed or replacement.
 

Starsky

Novice Member
If you start opening cases, poking and prodding around then you're going to void your warranty ... An example would be: if you brought a fridge/freezer from Dixons and it went wrong, you wouldn't start poking around the inside of the fridge/freezer you'd contact Dixons for it to be fixed or replacement.
Ridiculous example. There's no user-upgradeable parts on a fridge. You might replace a bulb.
A PC has user upgradeable parts which fall in line with warranty.
For a start it's generally accepted that opening a case to upgrade the RAM and perform general cleaning maintenance is fine and to this end, PCW don't void warranty, so opening to 'have a look' is not a problem. They recommend you take it in for The Tech Guys to charge you £15 to do so, but it's not an enforced condition.
I agree taking this unit back is the best option in this case (a 250W PSU is no use to anyone and he should be looking at a refund) but he would only void the warranty if when the case had been opened PCW could prove he had replaced say, a PSU or a chip he thought may be damaged, or broken other parts when he'd opened it.
 

FireKracker

Active Member
I'm all for people diagnosing their own problems, and avoiding paying astronomical prices for PC repair, however if the user has cover or insurance etc then the best cause of action would be to send the machine back.

In the past experience I've seen machines with a sticker covering two joining parts of the case, therefore 'pulling the case apart' would split the sticker and void the warranty. Whether PC World still implement this I don't know but there were numerous PC vendors that wouldn't take a machine back if it had been 'tampered' with.

The majority of people that purchase a machine from PC World don't usually want/need or have the experience of opening computer cases, checking that all hardware is seated correctly or that cables are connected to the correct ports/connectors. Should 'Chohan' get out his multimeter and start taking readings from the hardware??

As for my ridiculous example, you've never had to replace the door seals, thermostat or compressor?. In any case, it was a basic example.

My advice to Chohan would be to return the machine to where you purchased it from.
 

Starsky

Novice Member
You're being ridiculous again. I said I agreed that the unit should be returned.
Nowhere did I say OP should start tampering or testing. It was you that mentioned doing so by suggesting he shouldn't. I never mentioned anything of the sort. Please re-read my post.
I was correcting you as you said opening PC cases voids warranty. I spoke to one of 'The Tech Guys' (my friend works for DSG) and he confirmed they don't void for RAM upgrading - and specifically taking a PC's side off couldn't be enforced as a warranty void, legally. PCW would need to prove that hardware had been replaced or tampered with. Removing a side doesn't constitute tampering, despite what you have been led to believe. Chohan (or his Brother) would do no harm by sliding the side off - his Packard Bell has one catch which releases the whole side - and take a look to see if anything may have come astray or if the board shows obvious signs of a breakdown. How on Earth would someone be able to upgrade RAM or clean the machine otherwise. PCW (and we have established it's PCW, yes?) don't expect you to go running back to the store and cough up £15 to install RAM. Dell don't. Neither do Acer or Apple. I haven't seen a sticker on a new desktop PC case for as long as I can remember. All new laptops have a little (un-stickered) flap where you can put in your own RAM. Desktops don't, so the side comes off!
As for my ridiculous example, you've never had to replace the door seals, thermostat or compressor?
As a general user??? Hell no?! Have YOU? I would be sending it back to where I bought it or having someone out to repair it as there are NO user serviceable parts - unlike our friend's PC.
Hope that's a little clearer.
 

mdbarber

Active Member
the legal stance on user upgrades is very grey, most warrenties(which are subject to terms and conditions state "upgrades should be performed by qualified persons"
if you actually worked in an engineering discipline you could argue you were qualified, but if not you would be on thin ice.
 

The latest video from AVForums

Podcast: CES 2021 Special - Sony, LG, Panasonic, Samsung, TCL and Hisense TV news and more...

Latest News

Sky seals Studiocanal movie deal
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
iFi Audio launches iDSD Diablo DAC/Headphone amp
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Samsung launches Galaxy Buds Pro
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Samsung launches Galaxy S21, S21+ and S21 Ultra smart phones
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Mola Mola debuts Kula integrated amplifier
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Top Bottom