Pay TV Operators struggle to keep up with demands of Modern Consumer

hodg100

Distinguished Member
According to a study by ABI Research, Pay-TV companies are finding it difficult to keep up with the likes of Smart TVs and iPads as they service less tech-savvy cutomers with ageing hardware. We've seen for ourselves what dual-core processing can bring to the table in a number of Smart TVs this year and your typical STB is not going to be up to the task of running multiple tasks and apps the way a tablet, PC or Smart TV can.

With consumers having a wider choice than ever of VoD services, PAY TV operators are in danger of getting left behind.



“To meet this demand, pay-TV operators are adopting search, recommendation, and discovery technologies that can help viewers find the right content at the right time. These systems typically leverage cloud-based technologies to compensate for the older technology in the home,” says Sam Rosen, practice director of TV & video at ABI Research.

A recent survey by ABI Research showed that over half of consumers who own tablets are using video content while on connected TV platforms (including Blu-ray players, Smart set-top boxes, Connected TVs, and Connected Game Console), between 31 per cent and 52 per cent of consumers are using these for Internet video. Previous surveys have shown that BBC iPlayer and YouTube are easily the most popular apps on Smart TVs in the UK.

So, is the future going to be on-demand only?
 

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Bwlmog

Active Member
I have to admit having recently bought a smart TV i'm seriously tempted to leave Sky and its awful customer service for netflix and lovefilm which are significantly cheaper.
 

meveritt13

Novice Member
Interesting article and I do think that the days of having a tv schedule dictate when a person watches a programme is reducing. Granted there will be the mainstay programmes such as the 10 o'clock news for example (notwithstanding the availability of news via Twitter, tablet apps, etc) but with PVR's, I think people are more inclined to record programmes and watch when it suits them, not when the tv schedule says.

How long before broadband prices increase as companies need to upgrade infrastructure to cope with ever increasing demand, especially as high definition content becomes more readily available, just my personal opinion mind!
 

smackos

Well-known Member
Bwlmog said:
I have to admit having recently bought a smart TV i'm seriously tempted to leave Sky and its awful customer service for netflix and lovefilm which are significantly cheaper.

We've already made that jump, we ditched sky and a tv license. Sky tv's big hitter like Boardwalk Empire and Game of Thrones we just wait and get through from Lovefilm by Post. Everyday tv comes via Netflix and catchup. Between Netflix and Lovefilm we also get more than enough films as well.

We've gone from this..

Tv License £12.12 + Sky £63.5
(£907 a Year!)

To this..
Netflix + unblock + Lovefilm
(£186 a Year)

If we ever feel the need for more films or tv shows we can just up our Lovefilm subscription to add more discs. That isn't close to happening anytime soon either.

meveritt13 said:
Interesting article and I do think that the days of having a tv schedule dictate when a person watches a programme is reducing. Granted there will be the mainstay programmes such as the 10 o'clock news for example (notwithstanding the availability of news via Twitter, tablet apps, etc) but with PVR's, I think people are more inclined to record programmes and watch when it suits them, not when the tv schedule says.

How long before broadband prices increase as companies need to upgrade infrastructure to cope with ever increasing demand, especially as high definition content becomes more readily available, just my personal opinion mind!

Well technically as the infrastructure moves over to fibre-optic the capacity will already be there. Don't forget that for example Virgin tv is entirely built on sending tv down a pipe, you don't ever hear them complain your watching too much tv do you.

That's not to say Broadband companies won't be cynical and try and make us pay more, "metred usage" etc. Its already been tried by Mobile carriers, but market forces have quickly seen the return of unlimited data plans etc. I don't think Broadband will be any different.
 

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