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Panny 42inch HD Vs Pio 434 MXE1

Discussion in 'Plasma TVs' started by mikeham, Oct 3, 2004.

  1. mikeham

    mikeham
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    Is the HD panny the same black levels and colour etc than the SD PWD6 and if so why are there no comparisons for this against the Pio 434.

    Is the panny resolution the same as the pio?
    can they both take the 720vertical at 50 Htz European HD TV broadcast
    Is the HD panny HDMI

    Does anyone have any advice about these two panels.

    I want to buy a panel that is HD purely because Sky will braodcast HD in a couple of years (ie.futureproof the panel)

    Any advice ??

    Also what are the prices for a HD panny ?, where can you get them ?
     
  2. mikeham

    mikeham
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    Help please !!

    has anyone any comments regarding a comparison between the High Def Panasonic PHD6 and the pio 434 HDE or 43MXE1
     
  3. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
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    Blacks are less black on MX. Posterisation is less on MX. MX supports more resolutions and refresh rates via DVI. MX doesn't support HDCP encrypted sources via DVI.

    If you can live with the elevated black level of the MX...and I think most folk will unless they have had a Panny and you aren't going to use HDCP encypted sources then go PioneerMX. if you need HDCP support consider XDE/FDE/HDE versions.

    If you like dark blacks and and are sitting far enough away to not worry about posterisation issues (ie 3.5 or more screen widths) then go Panasonic.....at least that is my rambling thoughts for this evening.....

    off for more beer at hotel bar...

    Gordon
     
  4. Joe Fernand

    Joe Fernand
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    MikeHam

    The Panasonic SD and HD Displays are similar but not the same - the SD unit is to my eyes hampered by having a poorer quality video processing technology compared to the HD unit.

    From the 5 Series forward the SD units have included a lower cost Single Scan processor as compared to the more expensive Dual Scan processor in the HD units - this results in colour banding on the SD units that you don't see on the HD units.

    The HD unit has a 3000:1 quoted contrast ratio and lower maximum light output compared to the SD unit - though these specs have little or no detrimental affect on picture quality that I can 'see'; your unlikely to ever run either Display at Max brightness in TV or Home Theatre mode.

    The PHD6 and 43MXE1 are both fine units and as Gordon points out they each have individual peculiarities and viewers may find they prefer one over the other; though in our non scientific 'taste tests' at last years (was it last year?) Event2 technology showcase we played Musical Chairs with a Pioneer MXE and Panasonic PHD Display and a handful of DVD discs and the outcome was that everyone really required one of each as some viewers preferred certain discs on the PHD and the same viewers preferred other discs on the MXE.

    The Panasonic is HDCP compatible via its optional DVI input board - whereas Pioneer are leaving HDCP compatibility in the hands of third party developers such as Aurora Multimedia who are 'SOON' to launch the HDMI equipped TVP-500F board for the MXE1 range.,

    If you want PDF's and pricing on both ranges please drop me a PM.

    Best regards

    Joe

    Pioneer Plasma and Panasonic Display dealer since 1998!!!
     

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