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Question Panasonic vx870 4k camcorder download to hdd

Ade 7

Novice Member
Hi
I am totally new to camcorder video. Manual says you can download recorded video to an hdd connected directly to the camera. The camera will format the hdd to FAT32. I purchased a neeta 1tb hdd but the camera said device cannot be used? However if the camera's sd card is connected to my laptop the file can be saved and then transferred to the same hdd. Also I have an 4k action camera that runs on FAT32 but if you format a card on the action camera it comes up as check card on the camcorder? Is this a Panasonic issue?
Can anyone, ideally with same camcorder, explain this.
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
More likely a HDD or card issue.
For example, you are running the HDD off an independent power source? The camera will not supply power to the HDD.
Have you checked if the vx870 formatting structure is the same as the format from the 4K camera?
Is the 4K camera a Panasonic?
 

12harry

Well-known Member
Some cards can cause the OS to wonder if it's correctly formatted, but just click "NO" and continue working.
I believe, for movies most folks use NTFS format, as this is supposed to overcome the "4G limit" - but it's always best to Format in the camera, so it behaves itself. Once recorded, it's easy to transfer to a PC .

I have a similar issue with "some" USB-sticks . . . always trying to Format in the PC.... under the guise the OS is "helping"- I wonder?
However, it may be a standard procedure, - just risky if the stick contains something useful, and you accidently say "YES".

Cheers.
 

Ade 7

Novice Member
Hi
I am totally new to camcorder video. Manual says you can download recorded video to an hdd connected directly to the camera. The camera will format the hdd to FAT32. I purchased a neeta 1tb hdd but the camera said device cannot be used? However if the camera's sd card is connected to my laptop the file can be saved and then transferred to the same hdd. Also I have an 4k action camera that runs on FAT32 but if you format a card on the action camera it comes up as check card on the camcorder? Is this a Panasonic issue?
Can anyone, ideally with same camcorder, explain this
More likely a HDD or card issue.
For example, you are running the HDD off an independent power source? The camera will not supply power to the HDD.
Have you checked if the vx870 formatting structure is the same as the format from the 4K camera?
Is the 4K camera a Panasonic?
Thank you for the reply. The hdd was a portable so no power supply, the powered led lights on the hdd but is rejected by the camcorder. Allegedly a seagate portable slim is supposed to work with the vx870 as able to be formatted directly by the camcorder. However I am not convinced (yet to purchase another hdd) do I need to save to a FAT32 formatted hdd or just save the files to the laptop. I know I would not be able to play back through the camcorder but assume editing etc will still be possible by using a yet to purchase editing software package. As you can see I am relatively clueless as a total newbie to video.

Regarding the format structure the only info given for both items is that they run on FAT32! The camcorder is Panasonic and the action camera is an Akaso 50x.
 

12harry

Well-known Member
I'm more confused now, better informed . . . The camcorder should do what is says - but usually only with specific gear, so the issue of "power" may be answer, as I doubt the camcorder will run a HDD from its own battery (not for long!), so a separate PSU makes sense. Let the camcorder format the HDD if it's new/empty, as this is usually the easiest route.
That action camera and Pana camcorder will have different format needs, so it's best to let them be separate and not swap cards - I would suggest you use different capacity cards, to reduce the risk of getting it wrong, although most Action cams will use "micro SD"
The snag - if this is a "field" exercise to save memory-card; that you don't know what's been recorded to the HDD.... so you might waste perfectly good footage.
Budget to buy a s/h laptop - which would likely fix this and probably worth getting someone to install a (new) larger HDD and maybe new batteries . . . .

Cheers.
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
The camcorder should do what is says - but usually only with specific gear, so the issue of "power" may be answer, as I doubt the camcorder will run a HDD from its own battery (not for long!), so a separate PSU makes sense
Panasonic, in their user manual, say clearly that they DO NOT power a HDD. You need an independent power supply.
 

Ade 7

Novice Member
I'm more confused now, better informed . . . The camcorder should do what is says - but usually only with specific gear, so the issue of "power" may be answer, as I doubt the camcorder will run a HDD from its own battery (not for long!), so a separate PSU makes sense. Let the camcorder format the HDD if it's new/empty, as this is usually the easiest route.
That action camera and Pana camcorder will have different format needs, so it's best to let them be separate and not swap cards - I would suggest you use different capacity cards, to reduce the risk of getting it wrong, although most Action cams will use "micro SD"
The snag - if this is a "field" exercise to save memory-card; that you don't know what's been recorded to the HDD.... so you might waste perfectly good footage.
Budget to buy a s/h laptop - which would likely fix this and probably worth getting someone to install a (new) larger HDD and maybe new batteries . . . .

Cheers.
Thanks for that. I gather I need a lap top with 4gb ram to enable capable 4k editing so that may be the answer.
 

Ade 7

Novice Member
Panasonic, in their user manual, say clearly that they DO NOT power a HDD. You need an independent power supply.
There is a conflict here in that the manual on page 138 states that, "if you are using a bus powered or portable USB HDD this unit (the camcorder) can supply power to the USB HDD" ..... also says " Connect the AC adapter and a sufficiently charged battery to the unit" otherwise will not work.
However like you I am not convinced.
 

12harry

Well-known Member
Do you really need to transfer to HDD "in the field" - That's as I'm reading it?
If you spend the HDD money on some more SD cards the problem goes away.
Personally, I'd not trust a HDD in the field as they aren't really rugged ( one reason HDD were replaced by SD's in camcorders),
Modern SD cards if stored correctly, should be reliable enough to get your footage back to a computer where you can check the transfer - and ideally make two copies.... on different HDDs.

Cheers.
 

Ade 7

Novice Member
Do you really need to transfer to HDD "in the field" - That's as I'm reading it?
If you spend the HDD money on some more SD cards the problem goes away.
Personally, I'd not trust a HDD in the field as they aren't really rugged ( one reason HDD were replaced by SD's in camcorders),
Modern SD cards if stored correctly, should be reliable enough to get your footage back to a computer where you can check the transfer - and ideally make two copies.... on different HDDs.

Cheers.
Do you really need to transfer to HDD "in the field" - That's as I'm reading it?
If you spend the HDD money on some more SD cards the problem goes away.
Personally, I'd not trust a HDD in the field as they aren't really rugged ( one reason HDD were replaced by SD's in camcorders),
Modern SD cards if stored correctly, should be reliable enough to get your footage back to a computer where you can check the transfer - and ideally make two copies.... on different HDDs.

Cheers.
Thanks 12 Harry, I must admit that was in my mindset, however given the reasonable price of SD cards your suggestion makes sense.
I currently have three 64GB cards specific to each of the two camera's so that should be enough.
With video stored could you recommend editing software for a beginner to practice with?
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
Do you have a good PC to handle 4k? I stayed with HD as it is easier to edit with an average PC.

I use Corel's VideoStudio which is relatively easy to learn. (every video editor is a steep learning curve but there are many tutorials to help) VideoStudio 2019 will support 4k but I have no experience on how the PC will handle this.

On the plus side VS is relatively simple and a good starting platform. VS2019 is now replaced by 2020 so is relatively cheap to buy.I have found it stable and fairly bug free.
 

Ade 7

Novice Member
Do you have a good PC to handle 4k? I stayed with HD as it is easier to edit with an average PC.

I use Corel's VideoStudio which is relatively easy to learn. (every video editor is a steep learning curve but there are many tutorials to help) VideoStudio 2019 will support 4k but I have no experience on how the PC will handle this.

On the plus side VS is relatively simple and a good starting platform. VS2019 is now replaced by 2020 so is relatively cheap to buy.I have found it stable and fairly bug free.
Apologies for the late reply.
My laptop is getting on some and only 2GB ram so not to good. I have researched and believe a laptop with 4GB ram set up for gaming is the ideal tool for editing, however that means about £700 so it will have to wait a while.
Thanks for the advice re Video Studio and yes probably best try HD first, certainly whilst using my current lap top.
 

Terfyn

Well-known Member
Corel give a tech list for a PC:-
  • Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7, 64 bit only
  • Core i3 or AMD A4 series for standard videos. Intel Core i7 or AMD Athlon A10 for HD and UHD videos
  • 4 GB or higher, 8+ GB highly recommended for HD and UHD videos
  • Minimum display resolution: 1024 x 768, minimum 512 MB VRAM or higher recommended for hardware acceleration
  • Windows-compatible sound card
  • Minimum 10 GB for full installation
  • Internet connection required for installation, registration, and updates
This is basically a recommended requirement so I suggest you take this list to your Dealer and buy accordingly.

Obviously video editing puts a great demand on any PC so I do advise you buy up to the spec or editing will become very frustrating. I did read somewhere that you can convert the 4k to HD for editing purposes and this may work better.
Hope this helps.

For all the above reasons I have stuck with a tower system because they are so much more flexible than laptops and you can upgrade them. My own system has two screens, one for the editor and timelines and the other as a preview screen to see the edited video.
Good luck.


P.S. If you are very serious about editing I suggest you keep your laptop for general use and go for a tower system to major on the editing, I guess new costs will be similar.
 

Ade 7

Novice Member
Corel give a tech list for a PC:-
  • Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7, 64 bit only
  • Core i3 or AMD A4 series for standard videos. Intel Core i7 or AMD Athlon A10 for HD and UHD videos
  • 4 GB or higher, 8+ GB highly recommended for HD and UHD videos
  • Minimum display resolution: 1024 x 768, minimum 512 MB VRAM or higher recommended for hardware acceleration
  • Windows-compatible sound card
  • Minimum 10 GB for full installation
  • Internet connection required for installation, registration, and updates
This is basically a recommended requirement so I suggest you take this list to your Dealer and buy accordingly.

Obviously video editing puts a great demand on any PC so I do advise you buy up to the spec or editing will become very frustrating. I did read somewhere that you can convert the 4k to HD for editing purposes and this may work better.
Hope this helps.

For all the above reasons I have stuck with a tower system because they are so much more flexible than laptops and you can upgrade them. My own system has two screens, one for the editor and timelines and the other as a preview screen to see the edited video.
Good luck.


P.S. If you are very serious about editing I suggest you keep your laptop for general use and go for a tower system to major on the editing, I guess new costs will be similar.
Thank you Terfyn for the advice and info' all well noted.
I can now make a more educated decision.
 

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