Panasonic Viera TH50PX70BA confused about native resolution

Discussion in 'Panasonic TVs Forum' started by utreality, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. utreality

    utreality
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Messages:
    568
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +15
    i,ve got a Panasonic Viera TH50PX70BA always thought this was a 1080p screen, as on the pc ive run it at [email protected] for gaming, 720p for desktop, the osd states 1080p when i change it from 720p to 1080p and the osd states 720p when i change it back, i know the diff between 1080p and 720p and when i change res it does actually show that res, which is confusing, as the official spec has this tv listed as a 720p native screen.

    I cant fathom how the osd states 1080p when i change res and the res definitely looks like 1920x1080 and if it was interlaced wouldnt the osd state 1080i? and it wouldnt run at 60hertz would it?

    any explanation for this?
    Thanks
     
  2. Scooby2000

    Scooby2000
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    Messages:
    15,549
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Cambridge
    Ratings:
    +2,469
    The set displays what's being sent to it(as in the numbers it displays in the top corner) not what its displaying image wise. As a 720 or Im guessing actually 768 screen it'll be scaling the 1080p but just tel you its receiving it.
     
  3. fluxo

    fluxo
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Messages:
    7,109
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    163
    Ratings:
    +2,309
    The resolution is, as I understand it, 1,366 x 768 pixels. The OSD is likely
    telling you the resolution of the content being supplied to the TV. It's not
    telling you anything about the native resolution of the TV itself, which, in
    any case, is unalterable.
     
  4. utreality

    utreality
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Messages:
    568
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +15
    yes native 1366x768, but then why does it display [email protected] 60 hertz on the desktop when i change it to that res? is it showing a interlaced pic? if thats the case how can it run at 60hertz? also i mean when gaming and i change it to 1080 it looks like its running at that res not 720p, this is whats confusing me.
     
  5. Scooby2000

    Scooby2000
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    Messages:
    15,549
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Cambridge
    Ratings:
    +2,469
    I guess your desktop is telling you what the graphics cards sending you. If your set is a 768 it will receive 1080 and scale to fit the 768 screen.
    Just because you are able to send say 1080p doesn't mean its what you will see.

    768 vs 1080 is going to be hard to tel apart unless you sit close. an upscaled 720 image will likely look worse than a downscaled 1080p image....depending on your sets scaling abilities I guess.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2012
  6. utreality

    utreality
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Messages:
    568
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +15
    Thanks for the info, here lies the jest, desktop displays a 720p image when i change it to 1080 desktop displays a 1080 image i.e the icons become smaller and these more space on the desktop, just as it should be when you change to a higher res, now if this is running 1080i how can it run at 60hz? which according to win7 it is, this is whats getting me confused!
     
  7. utreality

    utreality
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Messages:
    568
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +15
    also if it is running at 1080i then wouldnt the osd state 1080i rather then 1080p? the screen is basically used as a pc monitor.
     
  8. fluxo

    fluxo
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Messages:
    7,109
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    163
    Ratings:
    +2,309
    What "it" are you referring to? Your graphics card or your tv or ...?

    And why does it surprise you that this whatever-it-is is running at
    60Hz? I don't wish to be rude, but I'm finding it difficult to follow
    what you are saying.

    Thanks.
     
  9. utreality

    utreality
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Messages:
    568
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +15
    it does refer to the tv, im not an expert on tvs, but i was under the impression that a 1080i image doesnt run @ 60hz? also on previous tvs, when changing resolution the osd would display 1080i not 1080p.

    This must be displaying a 1080i image i guess.
     
  10. fluxo

    fluxo
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Messages:
    7,109
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    163
    Ratings:
    +2,309
    That would be 1080i60 = 1920x1080 px resolution at 60 fields per second:

    1080i - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  11. andy1249

    andy1249
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    May 7, 2006
    Messages:
    8,606
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Ratings:
    +2,648
    Thats a pretty standard signal type in the states , and a lot of TV's here will accept 1080i @50 or 60 and 1080p at 50 or 60.

    The only signal that doesnt come in interlaced version is 720p , that must be what you were thinking of.

    As others have said , your TV , and most TV's for that matter , display the signal type they are recieving , not the native resolution of the display.

    Anything higher than the native res is simply scaled down to fit your screen.

    When you connect anything to your screen via HDMI the two devices will perform a handshake. Part of the information exchanged is a list of Signal types the Screen will accept , these will be available as options in your graphic card setup as a result of this handshake.

    No HDMI graphics card is limited by the native resolution of any screen , just by the list of acceptable signals , which one looks the best however , is a choice left up to you.

    Usually with HD ready sets like yours , its best to send the signal type that is closest closest to your sets native resolution.
     
  12. Scooby2000

    Scooby2000
    Distinguished Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    Messages:
    15,549
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Cambridge
    Ratings:
    +2,469
    Now why couldn't I put it like that.:smashin:
     

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice