Panasonic TX-65FZ952 Screen uniformity issues....

Had the display about 2 months and thought I could see issues with pink/blue banding and tried to ignore it - watched a video on youtube with a mostly white image and couldn't get over the colour banding issue...

Anyone else had this? So far got a repair company for Panny coming to look over it but the supplier (TPS) has been very helpful.

The images are from built in youtube running white only videos...

Anyone had similar?
 

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youngsyp

Distinguished Member
Great :( - Don't want all the hassle - So it can't be fixed then
I think it takes about an hour to replace the screen and they usually do it at your place, so it should be minimal hassle for you.

They may even just replace the whole TV, seeing as it's only 2 months old. I guess that would be more hassle though, as you'll need to box up this one and unbox and install the new one.

And no, it can't be fixed without replacing the panel. It's the result of a manufacturing defect I believe.

Paul
 

Ekko Star

Well-known Member
I'm curious as to why?

The OP will get a brand new panel and retain their warranty. It's as good as having a new TV.

Paul
I've always found a repair is never the same as a factory assembled TV.

If there was a choice I would always advise swapping out for a whole new TV. Especially at only 2mths old.

A repaired TV also diminishes its future re-sale value.
 
I agree - I am not happy at the prospect of a repair at all- and will push for replacement. Just checked the recept and its just over 3 months since I bought it but I was away all of August when it wasn't used. I have a repair agent coming to see the tv and if they suggest replacing the panel I will then see what my options are. I don't want to fight this but in the same way I am not going to accept a repaired set.
 

Ekko Star

Well-known Member
Not sure where you bought it from but insist on a replacement TV.

If they try fob you off just say if you wanted a 2 mth old refurbished TV then you would have bought a refurbished one to begin with. You bought a new TV and its clearly not fit for purpose within the space of 2mths.
 
Not sure where you bought it from but insist on a replacement TV.

If they try fob you off just say if you wanted a 2 mth old refurbished TV then you would have bought a refurbished one to begin with. You bought a new TV and its clearly not fit for purpose within the space of 2mths.
Agree - Need to let them inspect it first but will not accept a repair on this - will update
 

Ekko Star

Well-known Member
If they can't fix it just get rid of it and get a better TV
 

Ekko Star

Well-known Member
Because they might not be able to replace it with a new one you might have to get another TV or have this one repaired
 

Ekko Star

Well-known Member
No but you may have to consider another OLED. See what the store says as it's unlikely there will be much stock (if any) FZ952's left available now.

I reckon it will either be a repair or an alternative offering on the cards for you
 

Ekko Star

Well-known Member
No, that's a panel job and I think we've discussed that already. See what they say and take it from there
 
Panasonic are trying to repair the tv! - I have told them I will not accept a repair. Have to write a letter to start of a formal process now :( - Anyone else had to deal with this?
 

Waynej

Well-known Member
Panasonic are trying to repair the tv! - I have told them I will not accept a repair. Have to write a letter to start of a formal process now :( - Anyone else had to deal with this?
I've been down that route before. It's a lot of hassle.

I'd suggest googling 'consumer rights act 2015'. If my memory serves me well I believe if no fault is reported within the first 30 days, then you have to allow for at least 1 repair attempt. If it's still faulty after that then I believe you are in a better position to push for a refund.

If you've got a bad panel then they'll just replace it with a brand new one - usually in your own home.

I personally would also prefer to box it up and do a complete exchange, but if that's not possible, a new panel swap is certainly the next best thing.

I don't agree with the other poster that this diminishes the value or makes it equivilant to a refurb. Your TV was new, your replacement panel will also be new.
 
I've been down that route before. It's a lot of hassle.

I'd suggest googling 'consumer rights act 2015'. If my memory serves me well I believe if no fault is reported within the first 30 days, then you have to allow for at least 1 repair attempt. If it's still faulty after that then I believe you are in a better position to push for a refund.

If you've got a bad panel then they'll just replace it with a brand new one - usually in your own home.

I personally would also prefer to box it up and do a complete exchange, but if that's not possible, a new panel swap is certainly the next best thing.

I don't agree with the other poster that this diminishes the value or makes it equivilant to a refurb. Your TV was new, your replacement panel will also be new.
These sets are calibrated and setup in the factory to each other - the repair guy from down the road is not going to be able to do this - these repair panels will be setup to an average- I am giving the dealer until monday to sort it out before I pull the plug and return it.
 
Panasonic are refusing to replace - so having to go down the repair root - if there is a single pixel or mark on the set then it will be refused and a new set will be demanded. I don't normally back down but have to give them this one chance...
 

Ekko Star

Well-known Member
I agree it's all a massive hassle and headache.

At the end of it you will have a repaired TV which goes without saying diminishes its future value. If it works fine and you keep it then the value is perhaps immaterial.

However it would be fair for any prospective future buyer to knock you down on price. This would be fair as it goes without saying no field agent repair is the equivalent of a factory fresh unit.

Personally I wouldnt touch a used and repaired TV but YMMV depending on how you feel.

At the moment its cheaper for Panasonic to try repair and then fob you off. That's exactly what they will do.

Your best bet is through the retailer you bought it from as the contract you hold is with them and not with Panasonic.
 
I agree it's all a massive hassle and headache.

At the end of it you will have a repaired TV which goes without saying diminishes its future value. If it works fine and you keep it then the value is perhaps immaterial.

However it would be fair for any prospective future buyer to knock you down on price. This would be fair as it goes without saying no field agent repair is the equivalent of a factory fresh unit.

Personally I wouldnt touch a used and repaired TV but YMMV depending on how you feel.

At the moment its cheaper for Panasonic to try repair and then fob you off. That's exactly what they will do.

Your best bet is through the retailer you bought it from as the contract you hold is with them and not with Panasonic.
I doubt I will be keeping it - if the display is not 'as new' and free from the colour issues then it will be rejected at this point - I have the retailers word that this will open up another avenue... I don't hold up much hope it will return and I will be happy with it...

As for selling the display on - I have no plans to but if I did - I don't have to tell anyone the panel has been swapped and there should be no reason it should make the tv worth any less... if that is the case I can refuse the repair?
 

Ekko Star

Well-known Member
If its not repaired correctly then you can press on but I would doubt they would return it to you in a massively unsatisfactory condition. You would hope they have set standards but in reality you are in the hands of a field service agent.

They maybe able to replace the panel but I doubt they will calibrate it to the level the TV was when it left the factory.

You would really have to cross that bridge at that point.

As for future value a lot of knowledgable buyers will ask of its provenance, usage, was it an ex-demo, refurb or has it been repaired.

It's not for me to say. Its up to you if it ever came to that.

If I was in your shoes I would just talk to the retailer and leave Panasonic out of it at this stage.
 

Ekko Star

Well-known Member
if the display is not 'as new' and free from the colour issues then it will be rejected at this point - I have the retailers word that this will open up another avenue...
On this particular point if the field service agent says it is fine then you will have a massive headache ahead.

Looking back on this thread it does sound like you may have been pretty much fobbed off by the retailer already.

They have passed the buck onto Panasonic but Panasonic are in essence correct in their approach towards you.
 

Waynej

Well-known Member
Let it play out - the inconvenience of 1-2 engineers in your home for 30 mins or so is probably faster than it would take you to box the TV up.

I did try and point out previously about the consumer rights act 2015. From memory, if past a certain amount of time the retailer can insist on at least one repair. If you still have a fault after that then a replacement or refund should be an option.

The reduced value angle that Ekko mentions, I don't personally believe in that. At the end of the day your TV was new when you bought it, the panel that is being swapped in will be brand new. I agree with Ekko's value consideration only when buying an item as a refurb, as obviously you don't know the history then.

And from my experience of engineer visits, the persons visiting you will be far better and more knowledgable than factory workers, who if we're honest, probably just get told to put this here and screw there accross an assembly line.
 

Ekko Star

Well-known Member
Let it play out - the inconvenience of 1-2 engineers in your home for 30 mins or so is probably faster than it would take you to box the TV up.

I did try and point out previously about the consumer rights act 2015. From memory, if past a certain amount of time the retailer can insist on at least one repair. If you still have a fault after that then a replacement or refund should be an option.

The reduced value angle that Ekko mentions, I don't personally believe in that. At the end of the day your TV was new when you bought it, the panel that is being swapped in will be brand new. I agree with Ekko's value consideration only when buying an item as a refurb, as obviously you don't know the history then.

And from my experience of engineer visits, the persons visiting you will be far better and more knowledgable than factory workers, who if we're honest, probably just get told to put this here and screw there accross an assembly line.
I would disagree with all of that. The OP is clearly not happy about having it repaired as it's only 2 months old.

The engineer visits are inconvenient for anyone because until such time they have been and repaired the TV then Panasonic won't budge. If they repair the TV and it's working to their satisfaction Panasonic will go off the engineers test report and close the matter.

The matter of owners satisfaction will be a completely separate matter afterwards and he won't have a leg to stand on if the engineer report says its working fine.

A repaired TV would put a lot of people off. A new panel is never calbrated to the rest of the components and is no match for a factory unit. Straightforward devaluation. For example LG did this with faulty E6 TV's and replaced 3D panels with non 3D panels and owners were left high and dry.

If I was the OP I would not be happy going down the repair route 2 months in either. It means the TV was a nail when he got it. I think he's got every right demanding a refund or replacement as a TV that requires a new panel in that space of time was not fit for purpose.

Personally I would be straight onto the retailer and demand a refund or immediate replacement. A reputable retailer would normally oblige. All the above process is a sign of a retailer fobbing it off up the chain onto the manufacturer.
 
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Waynej

Well-known Member
I would disagree with all of that. The OP is clearly not happy about having it repaired as it's only 2 months old.

The engineer visits are inconvenient for anyone because until such time they have been and repaired the TV then Panasonic won't budge. If they repair the TV and it's working to their satisfaction Panasonic will go off the engineers test report and close the matter.

The matter of owners satisfaction will be a completely separate matter afterwards and he won't have a leg to stand on if the engineer report says its working fine.

A repaired TV would put a lot of people off. A new panel is never calbrated to the rest of the components and is no match for a factory unit. Straightforward devaluation. For example LG did this with faulty E6 TV's and replaced 3D panels with non 3D panels and owners were left high and dry.

If I was the OP I would not be happy going down the repair route 2 months in either. It means the TV was a nail when he got it. I think he's got every right demanding a refund or replacement as a TV that requires a new panel in that space of time was not fit for purpose.

Personally I would be straight onto the retailer and demand a refund or immediate replacement. A reputable retailer would normally oblige. All the above process is a sign of a retalier fobbing it off up the chain onto the manufacturer.
What's the point in getting people worked up? I get any owner would be frustrated.

I may be wrong as I've not double-checked the consumer rights act 2015 for well over a year. But so far his retailer and manufacturer appear to be co-operating. If consumer law means the retailer can insist on one repair, so be it. I do recommend anyone with a dispute like this to actually google the details of that act, just in case it's 90-days and not 30 like I think. Some retailers are known to push their luck if they think you don't know your rights.

You can say some nice words to a retailer, but whether they bend is another matter.

Personally, should a sale come about I think a prospective buyer would appreciate the fact knowing there was a panel defect, and it's since had a brand spanking new panel. If I was to buy a refurb from a private seller here, I'd be content to know the owner has spotted such an issue and got it sorted - rather than sell something they consider faulty.

Also, I am aware of your references to the 3D C6, I have seen those stories too. In such a case you could easily argue the repair has effectively damaged and removed the 3D feature from your TV. It's a refund no questions asked in that case, or so I would imagine.
 

Ekko Star

Well-known Member
What's the point in getting people worked up? I get any owner would be frustrated.

I may be wrong as I've not double-checked the consumer rights act 2015 for well over a year. But so far his retailer and manufacturer appear to be co-operating. If consumer law means the retailer can insist on one repair, so be it. I do recommend anyone with a dispute like this to actually google the details of that act, just in case it's 90-days and not 30 like I think. Some retailers are known to push their luck if they think you don't know your rights.

You can say some nice words to a retailer, but whether they bend is another matter.

Personally, should a sale come about I think a prospective buyer would appreciate the fact knowing there was a panel defect, and it's since had a brand spanking new panel. If I was to buy a refurb from a private seller here, I'd be content to know the owner has spotted such an issue and got it sorted - rather than sell something they consider faulty.

Also, I am aware of your references to the 3D C6, I have seen those stories too. In such a case you could easily argue the repair has effectively damaged and removed the 3D feature from your TV. It's a refund no questions asked in that case, or so I would imagine.
There's nothing to get worked up about here.

It's a rather simple case of talking to the retailer.

Going via the manufacturer Panasonic are doing nothing wrong and will result in field service engineers and a drawn out process. Ultimately, Panasonic will side with the engineers report anyway.

As for the LG scenario, they are no different to any other manufacturer. They fixed those TV's to a satisfactory working standard with non 3D panels. I don't think LG refunded anyone.

I highly doubt a replacement Panasonic panel will be calibrated to the level of the factory by a field service agent. There's also no guarantee of tinting or banding issues in a new panel. If the engineer says it fine, you don't have a leg to stand on.

All of the above and months of running around can be avoided by a simple conversation to the retailer.

The TV in question is only 2 months old and it is within the retailers realm to waive in the interest of good customer service and understand the customer has landed a nail. Passing it onto Panasonic at such an early stage is just a fob off.
 
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