Panasonic Plasma Bright Screen Buzzing Noise

cydavidho

Active Member
Recently my Panasonic plasma TH-103PF12E, a professional line product with 20k hours usage, has started buzzing under bright picture, I can hear it even from 3m away. I found a 'Panasonic Plasma Buzzing Permanent Repair Fix' video on Youtube. Do you think this solution will fix my screen? How likely if all screws are ok, the sus x or sus y, even the power boards could have capacitors coming to the end of life causing the buzzing?

The reason I ask is my screen is wall mounted, weight 250KG and is absolutely not easy to open the back for inspection. Hence, I want to narrow it down to the right resolution, get all parts ready, before I start the repair operation. Hope someone skillful on this forum can give me advice. Many thanks.

 

AudioBully

Standard Member
My 50 inch panasonic g20 made a loud ish buzzing with white snowy scenes for 8 years , right from brand new. Eventually the power board went after 9 years of heavy use, and i replaced it. I think the older plasma always had buzzing on bright scenes. I would just wait until something blows up. They draw a lot of power on white scenes hence the noise. Has the buzz got really loud and changed since you first purchased it?
 

mikej

Well-known Member
As above - my GT30 always buzzed on bright, white scenes. It was rare I would hear it over my sound system, though !

FWIW - a number of components (MOSFETs etc) on the SC board (essentially the same one as in your video) failed on mine after about 7.5 years, however the board screws appeared to be fine - there were no scorch marks around the contacts and they seemed to be done up tightly.

I've only just noticed the original posting date - did you ever go ahead with this ?

If not, it's hard to say whether looking pre-emptively will help in your case. For a lighter TV you could take off the wall yourself I'd say yes, but will there be a cost associated with doing this with your (very heavy) TV if you have to hire any equipment ?

If you're going to attempt any kind of DIY repairs, be aware that some internal components can retain a potentially lethal charge long after a TV has been switched off so great care needs to be taken.
 
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cydavidho

Active Member
As above - my GT30 always buzzed on bright, white scenes. It was rare I would hear it over my sound system, though !

FWIW - a number of components (MOSFETs etc) on the SC board (essentially the same one as in your video) failed on mine after about 7.5 years, however the board screws appeared to be fine - there were no scorch marks around the contacts and they seemed to be done up tightly.

I've only just noticed the original posting date - did you ever go ahead with this ?

If not, it's hard to say whether looking pre-emptively will help in your case. For a lighter TV you could take off the wall yourself I'd say yes, but will there be a cost associated with doing this with your (very heavy) TV if you have to hire any equipment ?

If you're going to attempt any kind of DIY repairs, be aware that some internal components can retain a potentially lethal charge long after a TV has been switched off so great care needs to be taken.
Thanks for your reply. I did not go ahead (yet!). I have further discovery. When room temperature above 20 degree celsius, the noise is not noticeable. But once below 17 degree, bright screen noise becomes very noticeable. This makes me think when circuit board expands or contracts can make a difference on screw tightness.

In my case, because it is much more involved to tighten a few screws inside a 200kg TV, either I can get help from an experienced professional and lifting machine for the TV, or it will be a case of managing room temperature, getting myself comfortable at above 20c before watching TV.

Would be great if you or anymore can provide repairing advice on this matter? I would like to get it fixed eventually, but need the right combination of resources to do so.
 

mikej

Well-known Member
In my case, taking the back off my GT30 and doing some basic fault-finding with the aid of a digital multimeter, a (downloaded) service manual and info from other websites/YouTube videos was a no-brainer because the TV had actually developed a fault and stopped working plus it's also easy to move, whereas your case is different because the buzzing is currently more of an annoyance that may or may not lead to something more serious in the future, plus the weight of your TV makes moving it far more of a problem.

Whether you want to check the board screws pre-emptively depends on your attitude to risk I guess and whether you can justify any cost associated in doing so.

If hiring someone with equipment will be expensive, then you'll end up paying that regardless of whether you try and fix the problem in advance by just tightening the screws or if you were to leave it and fix it if and when things go wrong. The only difference between the two scenarios will be the cost of any failed components or boards and the time it takes to get it fixed, but then there's a chance it'll never go wrong due to loose screws. It's a tough call and not one I would like to make for you !

It might be worth trying to track down other owners of your particular TV or do some research to see if it is a known problem with your particular model.

If you ever need it, the service manual for your TV can be found here. It seems a trustworthy site (as far as I can tell) and one I've used for finding other manuals in the past. Be aware though that TV service manuals are meant for use by trained technicians and that working inside any TV can be potentially hazardous, even if you're only taking the back cover off.

Speaking of back covers - I noticed in the manual that there are a total of 154 screws you have to undo to remove yours :rotfl:
 

cydavidho

Active Member
In my case, taking the back off my GT30 and doing some basic fault-finding with the aid of a digital multimeter, a (downloaded) service manual and info from other websites/YouTube videos was a no-brainer because the TV had actually developed a fault and stopped working plus it's also easy to move, whereas your case is different because the buzzing is currently more of an annoyance that may or may not lead to something more serious in the future, plus the weight of your TV makes moving it far more of a problem.

Whether you want to check the board screws pre-emptively depends on your attitude to risk I guess and whether you can justify any cost associated in doing so.

If hiring someone with equipment will be expensive, then you'll end up paying that regardless of whether you try and fix the problem in advance by just tightening the screws or if you were to leave it and fix it if and when things go wrong. The only difference between the two scenarios will be the cost of any failed components or boards and the time it takes to get it fixed, but then there's a chance it'll never go wrong due to loose screws. It's a tough call and not one I would like to make for you !

It might be worth trying to track down other owners of your particular TV or do some research to see if it is a known problem with your particular model.

If you ever need it, the service manual for your TV can be found here. It seems a trustworthy site (as far as I can tell) and one I've used for finding other manuals in the past. Be aware though that TV service manuals are meant for use by trained technicians and that working inside any TV can be potentially hazardous, even if you're only taking the back cover off.

Speaking of back covers - I noticed in the manual that there are a total of 154 screws you have to undo to remove yours :rotfl:
Thank you. I studied the service manual. Sounds easy, but not simple in my case. Below was the installation picture, serious equipment and planning was required. :)

1612712581810.png
 

AudioBully

Standard Member
Now I have seen the size of this TV, I would be scouring the internet for 2nd hand boards such as power board, av board, and the other boards that all fail sooner or later. I have owned 3 panasonic plasma that all died at the 8 to 9 year stage of life. For insurance its good to have spare set of boards , even if they are second hand. I am trying to repair a txp50ut50 plasma but its proving tough. Luckily i picked up an tx50st50 for 100 notes the other day , so still got a working 50 inch in the house. Is there a sub group on this forum for plasma enthusiasts that are trying to learn plasma repair? I could use some assistance, and would also be willing to share knowledge as I pick up new skills??
For your info, if you get a blinking red light fault, there seem to be many ebay electronic repair services claiming to take the pcb board and repair the board via a service kit.
 

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