Panasonic hz1000 or lg cx

Jeffcal

Standard Member
I've narrowed my choice of TV down to the Panasonic hz1000 or the LG cx.
The tv will be used for mixed iptv viewing and Prime/netflix content streamed through a nvidia shield.
I doubt I'll be gaming on it so hdmi 2.1 not important.
I currently have a 55 hz950 but am looking to up grade to 65" TV. The hz1000 is slightly more expensive than the cx however if the upscalling of the hz1000 is better I dont mind paying abit more.
Has anyone had both tvs that can help me decide which one to purchase?
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
HZ1000 will look exactly like the GZ950, so you should have a good idea what to expect already.
LG by comparison is more future proof with HDMI 2.1 ports, that doesn't really matter if you don't game. LG also has better smart TV though, its faster, easier to use and has more app choice.

Why are you concerned about upscaling if you have the shield? It will be done by the shield instead unless you setting a low res resolution output signal from the shield to the TV.
 
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Dodgexander

Moderator
With Sky/Virgin you will likely output 4k to the TV like with the shield, so also won't be doing upscaling on the TV.

Hard to say which will be better at upscaling from built in apps, I don't think there's a lot in it like their used to be, Panasonic may have the edge still though.
 

fzst

Active Member
Well, I had both of them at home. The CX went back after 2 weeks because of very bad dark uniformity and now I have the HZ 1000. It's hard to recall from memory but I remember being instantly wowed by the more natural colours of the Panasonic. The LG looked more artificial but really pleasing to the eye! LG provides a lot of pop to the image whereas the Panasonic looks more real but maybe a bit tame in comparison. Idk why but when I looked at the LG the word "creamy" always came to mind to describe the picture. I definately don't want to say that the LG looked bad just different, not as lifelike as the Panasonic. I bet that this would not matter too much if you would calibrate the LG though...

The biggest difference is the near black handling, the Panasonic is way better in dark scenes. With the CX I always felt like it crushed the blacks and after receiving the Panasonic, I knew that I was right. The Panasonic reveils more detail in dark scenes and has smoother gradients, whereas the LG had kind of "harsher" lines between different shades of grey... Panasonic's approach needs very good dark uniformity to look good though. I feel like with LG, the slightly crushed blacks and less smooth transitions from black to dark grey provies some forgiveness to dark scenes whereas on the Panasonic, every fault of the panel is quickly exposed.

Disclaimer: This could also have been due to the bad uniformity of my LG set though (the Pana still has a small darker patch on the left side but it's way better than the LG). Every comparison I saw between the two online showed similar behaviour though, so I doubt that it was just my set...

Everyone says, that Panasonic is best in surpressing near black chrominance overshoot (at least they were in 2020). I don't fully agree though. The Lg has more flashing artifacts yes but the Pansonic has a different problem because by switching the white subpixel off under a 5% stimulus, they just "moved the problem around" into an area less sensitivive to the human eye (brighter greay). This generally works but sometimes results in a bright white line along the transitionline between different shades of grey, like it is described here .
I see this quite often in bitstarved content (Amazon prime is pretty bad in terms of this problem) and IMO it's more annyoing than the flashing of some areas mostly in the background like it happens on the LG because it appears a lot on people's faces and the viewers attention is mostly focused on them.

Regarding motion, I felt like the Panasonic has way worse motion in the beginning after I received the HZ 1000. On the LG, everything looked really smooth to my eye whereas the HZ 1000 had horrible judder without any motion interpolation enabled and even worse artifacts with higher IFC settings. I never really touched the motion settings on the LG during the two weeks I had it, so I can't really fully comment on LG's motion (I think I had it set to real cinema). To me, That's a really good sign though that I didn't even had to touch the motion settings and was completely happy with the smoothness.
Now that I had quite some time to test the motion of the Pana, I am pretty happy with it's motion as well though. I use deblur 2 and dejudder 4 most of the time, these settings provide almost issuefree motion to my eyes whithout noticeable artifacts (which are way worse than some blur or judder for me). I don't like BFI because my eyes get tired pretty quickly from it even on the min setting and it also does not much for me in reducing motion blur or judder anyways... Whitout any IFC engaged, 24p content on the HZ 1000 is anwatchable for me, with it it's pretty smooth though.

I actually grew to like Panasonic's OS quite a bit: It's fast, responsive and simple. The only problem is the lack of apps which is quite annoying on this day and age, especially the absence of D+ hurts. LG definately has the upper hand in this regard and the curser mouse feature in combination with abluetooth remote (Panasonics is onlcy IR) is amazing but I like Panasoic's OS better.

All in all I am really happy with the HZ 1000 and I would recommand it over the LG if the price hike isn't too steep (like more than a decent calibration would cost).
 
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Dodgexander

Moderator
Everyone says, that Panasonic is best in surpressing near black chrominance overshoot (at least they were in 2020). I don't fully agree though. The Lg has more flashing artifacts yes but the Pansonic has a different problem because by switching the white subpixel off under a 5% stimulus, they just "moved the problem around" into an area less sensitivive to the human eye (brighter greay). This generally works but sometimes results in a bright white line along the transitionline between different shades of grey, like it is described here .
I see this quite often in bitstarved content (Amazon prime is pretty bad in terms of this problem) and IMO it's more annyoing than the flashing of some areas mostly in the background like it happens on the LG because it appears a lot on people's faces and the viewers attention is mostly focused on them.

Regarding motion, I felt like the Panasonic has way worse motion in the beginning after I received the HZ 1000. On the LG, everything looked really smooth to my eye whereas the HZ 1000 had horrible judder without any motion interpolation enabled and even worse artifacts with higher IFC settings. I never really touched the motion settings on the LG during the two weeks I had it, so I can't really fully comment on LG's motion (I think I had it set to real cinema). To me, That's a really good sign though that I didn't even had to touch the motion settings and was completely happy with the smoothness.
Now that I had quite some time to test the motion of the Pana, I am pretty happy with it's motion as well though. I use deblur 2 and dejudder 4 most of the time, these settings provide almost issuefree motion to my eyes whithout noticeable artifacts (which are way worse than some blur or judder for me). I don't like BFI because my eyes get tired pretty quickly from it even on the min setting and it also does not much for me in reducing motion blur or judder anyways... Whitout any IFC engaged, 24p content on the HZ 1000 is anwatchable for me, with it it's pretty smooth though.
I'm not sure the default motion settings will be disabled on the LG, so I don't necessarily makes for a good comparison. Most TVs default to some motion preset (which involves some degree of interpolation).

Sadly on modern displays its necessary to use some motion interpolation. Sample and hold displays, especially larger, brighter ones do not handle motion as good as Plasma TVs of the past, and even older, dimmer TVs.

I think Panasonic made the correct decision shifting the dithering to avoid the near to black issues. I think its far more common to see problems in that area, than it is a bit closer to gray.
 

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