Panasonic GZ2000 OLED Owners Thread

Updated: Do you hear speaker crackling when watching the GZ2000

  • I still have crackling even after the latest version of the firmware

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    70

Samv0808

Distinguished Member
I had the pleasure of Steve Kemp around again to calibrate my 55GZ2000. He had previously done my 55FZ952 with stunning results.


Let me say that Steve is a consummate professional and very passionate about his work.


Once he started the calibration he immediately noticed the white point was not accurate out the box and colour was pushing too much red despite what reviews state.You really need to get this calibrated to correct these errors and more.


Once he calibrated the SD and HDR the results were simply breathtaking. I can’t believe what I’m seeing right now. The depth, of colours, shadow details and depth of black along with colour accuracy is something I’ve not seen since I owned a pioneer KRP500A but this is on a different level.


Last year model the 55FZ802/ 952 were amazing but lacked the Dolby vision but having Dolby vision on this set surpasses HD10 In so many ways and surpasses my 55FZ952.


I must stress to you please do not settle for the OOB settings from this TV and think your getting the best image because your not. Calibration is a must!


I highly recommend Steve and you won’t be disappointed!


Link to his website if you need to contact him.


https://www.displayandsoundcalibration.com/about-us
Thanks. Will get calibrated once I know I’m keeping the set!
 

BizkitBoy

Active Member
I don’t recalling hearing any humming on mine. I guess maybe the crackling won!
No buzz/hum from mine
Ditto

Just just the occasional crackling and it's not on a plate where it belongs:laugh:
Thanks for the input, guys!
Well, that can mean one of 2 things:
- either my ears are really sensitive... which I am because I've often heard certain high pitch sounds that my girlfriend struggled to perceive;
- either I got a dud... though I really doubt it's the case.

Gonna continue paying attention to it and ask my girlfriend if she hears anything when we're watching something.

Game mode bypasses any unnecessary processing to allow for a 20ms response time. With game mode off and or ifc on, response time increases to around 120ms. It’s a huge difference especially when playing online shooters like I do.
So you're saying that Game Mode OFF or Game Mode ON & IFC enabled is the same thing in terms of input lag?
I find that hard to believe. Has any reviewer actually tested it?
 

youngsyp

Distinguished Member
The tint is not that obvious and not that bothering.
Good to hear (read...).
From what I understand, white tinting is a very common defect amongst all OLED, of all brands.
It's just that some exhibit it very apparently and disturbingly, like one of the users here had the misfortune to experience it.
It certainly seems to be yes. It will be interesting to see whether it's just down to the out the box picture settings, and not an inherent 'issue'. If you don't notice it in content though, that's moot anyway.

Paul
 

JimBobRude

Active Member
Thanks for the input, guys!
Well, that can mean one of 2 things:
- either my ears are really sensitive... which I am because I've often heard certain high pitch sounds that my girlfriend struggled to perceive;
- either I got a dud... though I really doubt it's the case.

Gonna continue paying attention to it and ask my girlfriend if she hears anything when we're watching something.

So you're saying that Game Mode OFF or Game Mode ON & IFC enabled is the same thing in terms of input lag?
I find that hard to believe. Has any reviewer actually tested it?
You can’t enable ifc with game mode on. Game mode forces IFC off to ensure the fastest response time. With game mode OFF the tv is performing various processing tasks which slows down the response. Vincent Teoh measures this in his TV tests.
Game mode should only be used with 60/50hz content because with 24hz content it just simply performs 3:2 pulldown, To correctly playback 24hz content at 24fps the TVs game mode must be switched off and PURE DIRECT must also be switched off.
 

BizkitBoy

Active Member
It certainly seems to be yes. It will be interesting to see whether it's just down to the out the box picture settings, and not an inherent 'issue'. If you don't notice it in content though, that's moot anyway.

Paul
Perhaps Vincent will clarify this for us.
I'm certainly going to get mine calibrated as well but need to put the hours on it first.
It's gonna take a while...

If I look at test patterns, the tint is quite in your face.
But in real world content, that's certainly not the case... and that's what matters in the end.
The white room scene in The Matrix is (in some frames) almost fully white and did not bother me. Of course, there are also the factors that it's only 2.39:1 aspect ratio and all the film grain from the 35mm it was shot on.
I might need to check some movies shot digitally and without any or too much digital grain added in post processing.

You can’t enable ifc with game mode on. Game mode forces IFC off to ensure the fastest response time. With game mode OFF the tv is performing various processing tasks which slows down the response. Vincent Teoh measures this in his TV tests.
Game mode should only be used with 60/50hz content because with 24hz content it just simply performs 3:2 pulldown, To correctly playback 24hz content at 24fps the TVs game mode must be switched off and PURE DIRECT must also be switched off.
That's true, but it's unfair Panasonic has restricted this by default.
As mentioned, it wasn't like this on the plasma. There I had all processing turned off with the exception of IFC set to Min, and Game Mode ON, of course. It made a significant difference in input lag so IFC wasn't influencing it that much.

Even if IFC enabled has a hit on input lag, it's certainly miles better than the 120ms experienced with Game Mode OFF.
Panasonic should have let this down to each individual user, meaning that whoever wants IFC disabled in Game Mode (like gamers) can do so, and who ever wants both enabled can do so (like people watching content from PC, such as myself).

This is on them and they should be made aware of it.
 

NewTvAddict

Active Member

Tegs200

Active Member
I think it's a pain for owners of a £4300 Flagship Customized panel to then have to go and spend at least another £400 to get the picture right , it's a joke.
 

youngsyp

Distinguished Member
Perhaps Vincent will clarify this for us.
Yes, that would be good for all GZ OLED owners.
I'm certainly going to get mine calibrated as well but need to put the hours on it first.
It's gonna take a while...

If I look at test patterns, the tint is quite in your face.
But in real world content, that's certainly not the case... and that's what matters in the end.
Couldn't agree more.

Test patterns are like a zoom lense, that'll show any and every imperfection. Content acts a a filter, that makes any issue imperceptible.

Paul
 

Samv0808

Distinguished Member
I think it's a pain for owners of a £4300 Flagship Customized panel to then have to go and spend at least another £400 to get the picture right , it's a joke.
Actually I think the more you pay for it the more I would say I want to eeek that small bit of extra performance or correction. And is set up for my environment

I bet even that 20 grand B and W needs calibration. Although for that money I hope they throw one in for you!! Also think of the cost of the wall paper model and the retractable LG one. Way over the gz2000 cost but still need calibrating I bet.

I see it as a small investment personally.

And no one has to get it calibrated.

Edit: and for the wife it’s worth it to stop my incessant settings fiddling
 
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youngsyp

Distinguished Member
I think it's a pain for owners of a £4300 Flagship Customized panel to then have to go and spend at least another £400 to get the picture right , it's a joke.
Couldn't disagree more.

For these displays to meet the relevant standards for picture accuracy out of the box, Panasonic would need to account for every single picture setting combination, viewing environment and source content variation, a user might present.

From what we've seen thus far, I think they've done an excellent job of getting close to that, which is no mean feat.

And the GZ2000 doesn't have a customised panel!

Paul
 

Tegs200

Active Member
Actually I think the more you pay for it the more I would say I want to eeek that small bit of extra performance or correction.

I bet even that 20 grand B and W needs calibration. Although for that money I hope they throw one in for you!! Also think of the cost of the wall paper model and the retractable LG one. Way over the gz2000 cost but still need calibrating I bet.

I see it as a small investment personally.

And no one has to get it calibrated.

Edit: and for the wife it’s worth it to stop my incessant settings fiddling
I'm not saying it will not improve it but I think the way it's marketed as the holy grail with a specially customized panel from panasonic experts and Hollywood i personally think it should be right out of the box and not all over the place as described , still a great tv .
 

THXMovieMan

Active Member
I feel if people want to get the tv's calibrated to get more performance out why can't they. With the GZ2000 I think Panasonic have done excellent job in the picture department and the sound department ( minus the crackle :facepalm:). I think most people would be very happy with the picture quality out the box but for me, spending £3300 on a TV I want to make it as best I can do I will be getting mine calibrated.
You can't really expect Panasonic to custom calibrate all TV's on a mass production.
 

Samv0808

Distinguished Member
I'm not saying it will not improve it but I think the way it's marketed as the holy grail with a specially customized panel from panasonic experts and Hollywood i personally think it should be right out of the box and not all over the place as described , still a great tv .
I do see your point but they never said it would be perfectly calibrated to a specific spec. I imagine there are many variables before they could promise this. They might even drift from these settings if they calibrated in the factory. Dunno. I would imagine the only way could guarantee this is including a calibration in home after purchase. And maybe a calibrators opinion of way off might not matter to everyone.

Consumer sets will still generally need a calibration to have them 100% optimal I would think no matter what you pay..
 

mtenga

Distinguished Member
I'm not saying it will not improve it but I think the way it's marketed as the holy grail with a specially customized panel from panasonic experts and Hollywood i personally think it should be right out of the box and not all over the place as described , still a great tv .
I think there is some truth in this. There are defined industry standards for image reproduction. Either a TV leaves the factory and meets those standards or it does not. Panasonic seem to have done a reasonable job on the GZ series by most accounts and the GZ2000 is a consumer level TV but not cheap.
 

letmeboogey

Active Member
Hi Guys

Just to update you about the crackling issue I purchased a Panasonic Gz2000 through a Panasonic dealer but unfortunately I will be waiting for my tv for a bit, as there isn’t stock at Panasonic and they have just received a memo to state they have put a pause on the distribution of the GZ2000 to their partners due to this crackling sound issue. The retailer has been advised that their engineers are currently investigating it and appears to be a software issue. Once this has been fixed normal supply will continue as this fix will be applied to new batches of TVs and the rest I presume will need to update. The retailer said they will be concentrating on this to get this fixed ASAP as they can’t have have long periods of non supply. I hope it helps. Apparently the next batch or supply from Panasonic isnt available until from w/c 16th sept at earliest so hoping they get fixes out before that supply arrives to give them time to fix these sets too hopefully. I will patiently wait for it.
 
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youngsyp

Distinguished Member
I think there is some truth in this. There are defined industry standards for image reproduction. Either a TV leaves the factory and meets those standards or it does not.
They are defined standards but, how accurare an TV is, is greatly impacted by the viewing environment, and the resulting choice of picture settings. It's this and normal mass production panel variances that calibration will correct. To be blunt, to expect a consumer, mass produced TV to be perfectly accurate in every end user scenario is not logical.

I've not read anywhere that Panasonic states it meets any particular standards, out of the factory either. That seems to be a typical assumption of some end users...

Paul
 

JimBobRude

Active Member
Perhaps Vincent will clarify this for us.
I'm certainly going to get mine calibrated as well but need to put the hours on it first.
It's gonna take a while...

If I look at test patterns, the tint is quite in your face.
But in real world content, that's certainly not the case... and that's what matters in the end.
The white room scene in The Matrix is (in some frames) almost fully white and did not bother me. Of course, there are also the factors that it's only 2.39:1 aspect ratio and all the film grain from the 35mm it was shot on.
I might need to check some movies shot digitally and without any or too much digital grain added in post processing.

That's true, but it's unfair Panasonic has restricted this by default.
As mentioned, it wasn't like this on the plasma. There I had all processing turned off with the exception of IFC set to Min, and Game Mode ON, of course. It made a significant difference in input lag so IFC wasn't influencing it that much.

Even if IFC enabled has a hit on input lag, it's certainly miles better than the 120ms experienced with Game Mode OFF.
Panasonic should have let this down to each individual user, meaning that whoever wants IFC disabled in Game Mode (like gamers) can do so, and who ever wants both enabled can do so (like people watching content from PC, such as myself).

This is on them and they should be made aware of it.
But you’re expecting the the processing to be the same on a 4K OLED vs a 1080 plasma. You can’t compare the 2. If other OLED manufactures had managed to get a game mode working with IFC enabled AND 20ms response I would understand your complaint but it obviously can’t be done.
 

mtenga

Distinguished Member
To be blunt, to expect a consumer, mass produced TV to be perfectly accurate in every end user scenario is not logical.

I've not read anywhere that Panasonic states it meets any particular standards, out of the factory either. That seems to be a typical assumption of some end users...

Paul
I'd never expect that.

But on a 65 Inch TV that costs more than £4000 and is marketed as professional, with images as how the director intended then you shouldn't need to fork out for a calibration. They boast that this TV is the "Choice of Hollywood Professionals".
 

THXMovieMan

Active Member
I'm not saying it will not improve it but I think the way it's marketed as the holy grail with a specially customized panel from panasonic experts and Hollywood i personally think it should be right out of the box and not all over the place as described , still a great tv .
It's not a custom panel. Panasonic just get the panel early in the production. Sony, lg, Samsung TV's cost in the same price range. They don't come calibrated.
The picture quality out the box is excellent and most will be happy with that.
If people can afford it why can't they have it calibrated.
Don't forget this is a consumer product. Not a reference montior.
 
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youngsyp

Distinguished Member
But on a 65 Inch TV that costs more than £4000 and is marketed as professional, with images as how the director intended then you shouldn't need to fork out for a calibration.
That's your expectation. Or is it? You seem to state that's not your expectation, then state it is. :confused:

They boast that this TV is the "Choice of Hollywood Professionals".
They do but, they never define what that actually means. In reality, it could mean anything.

Paul
 

mtenga

Distinguished Member
That's your expectation. Or is it? You seem to state that's not your expectation, then state it is. :confused:

They do but, they never define what that actually means. In reality, it could mean anything.

Paul
You said..."To be blunt, to expect a consumer, mass produced TV to be perfectly accurate in every end user scenario is not logical."

I said I'd never expect that and I would not.

But Panasonic markets the TV as a professional model used by Hollywood and there is a reasonable expectation on behalf of the consumer that those words imply accuracy with industry standards. To then require somebody to pay a calibrator get it up to those industry standards is a bit much, but clearly not every single panel can be "reference".
 

youngsyp

Distinguished Member
You said..."To be blunt, to expect a consumer, mass produced TV to be perfectly accurate in every end user scenario is not logical."

I said I'd never expect that and I would not.
I did write that and you did write that in response, and then you wrote (in the same post) a similar 'but' statement to the below, essentially reversing your "I'd never expect that" statement, now stating that you would expect that. And you've done the same in here. Hence my confusion.

But Panasonic markets the TV as a professional model used by Hollywood and there is a reasonable expectation on behalf of the consumer that those words imply accuracy with industry standards.
Does it? I'm not trying to be argumentative but, I'm a consumer and that's not what it implies to me. To me, it merely implies that the display is used by professionals in Hollywood. Nothing more, nothing less.

I'd argue that most consumers don't even know there are industry standards for picture accuracy on TV's, let alone expect them.
There are degrees of accuracy too. And it seems the GZ2000, in general, is probably the most accurate consumer TV, out the box, that has been seen to date.

I think we should move on as this back and fourth is just taking up server space.

Paul
 

mtenga

Distinguished Member
I don't think it is confusing in the least but there you go. I will leave it.
 

raymondo77

Distinguished Member
The £30,000 Sony (genuinely) professional broadcast OLED still requires a calibration, so it's hardly surprising that the Panasonic does too.
 

Tegs200

Active Member
It's not a custom panel. Panasonic just get the panel early in the production. Sony, lg, Samsung TV's cost in the same price range. They don't come calibrated.
The picture quality out the box is excellent and most will be happy with that.
If people can afford it why can't they have it calibrated.
Don't forget this is a consumer product. Not a reference montior.
Ok Craig Cunningham from Panasonic said at CES that they customize the GZ2000 heavily with there engineers plus they are in collaboration with Hollywood and more to the point Stephen Sonnenfield who by his own admission is a colour accuraist specialist and in his words why the Panasonic is how Hollywood intended , now in not saying it's not a good tv but it obviously dosnt deliver in what they are telling us as it should unless you pay another proffesional to do it for you.
 

fold123

Standard Member
The price tag discussion is really amusing. Just compare the tags on various models and manufacturers. IMHO in 19 the gz 950 offers the best bang for the buck for normal oleds and the gz2000 for higher end. At least the gz2000 offers some aspects regarding PQ the 950 doesn't, apart from design/sound. That's not the case for all manufacturers and they still nearly hit its price :D

Also they offer THX certified image modes, one can't argue they don't live up to their promises, if you'd like to use them is a different matter, I don't.
 

NewTvAddict

Active Member
Apparently the next batch or supply from Panasonic isnt available until from w/c 16th sept at earliest so hoping they get fixes out before that supply arrives to give them time to fix these sets too hopefully. I will patiently wait for it.
Cheers for the update :thumbsup:

Hopefully will not take that long for a software fix
 

lgans316

Distinguished Member
If anyone can fork out £4,000 for a 65" TV, I think they can go the extra mile to spend few hundreds to get theirs calibrated. It is up to owners to decide what they want to do with their own TVs. I bet even this Netflix Calibrated mode is not accurate and won't please everyone.
 

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