Panasonic DVD-RAM disc questions

sidefall

Standard Member
Hi,

I need to buy a load of DVD-RAM discs to archive various irreplacable footage.

What I plan to do is:

Record material from VHS/SVHS/Hi8/DV onto my DMR-E95's hard drive
Basic edit on E95 (topping and tailing mostly)
Copy to DVD-RAM on E95
Copy DVD-RAM discs to computer with RAID array
Keep the DVD-RAM discs for added security

I need to buy about 100 DVD-RAM discs. I'm probably going to go for non-cartridge ones for cost/space/availability reasons. But I want to make the right choice, not just for reasons of time and money, but also because the material has great sentimental value.

Firstly, are there any reliability issues with non-cartridge DVD-RAM discs? How sensitive to scratches are they? I've only used the cartridge ones. The discs will not be getting regular use.

Secondly, are there any issues with copying back the DVD-recorder files from the computer to a new DVD-RAM disc at some time in the future? I've heard of possible CPRM issues.

It seems that the only DVD-RAM discs readily available are the Pansonic LM-AF120LE. Any known problems with these?

(The DVD-RAM drive in my computer is a Panasonic SW-9573)

Also, did 5x DVD-RAM discs ever get made?

Thanks,

Dave
 

paul-av-tech

Active Member
Do you have a specific reason to use RAM media? DVDR media is readily available and cheaper, I also think you will find better compatability with domestic DVD players. Can your DVDRam drive cope with other media formats?

Personally I would compile enough material to fill a DVD disk and then burn it in one pass.

Have heard mutters that DVDR media is not as robust for scratches etc. with the whole disk becoming unplayable when subjected to rough handling.

I am sure whichever way you choose will be fine :)
 

sidefall

Standard Member
Do you have a specific reason to use RAM media? DVDR media is readily available and cheaper, I also think you will find better compatability with domestic DVD players. Can your DVDRam drive cope with other media formats?

Have heard mutters that DVDR media is not as robust for scratches etc. with the whole disk becoming unplayable when subjected to rough handling.

DVD-RAM is reckoned to be far more robust than DVD-R. I am not worried about compatibility as I can always make a DVD-R if needed.
 

ChainsawDude

Active Member
This offer maybe of interest to you, £10 for a pack of 10 incl postage
http://www.avforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=431986

Firstly, are there any reliability issues with non-cartridge DVD-RAM discs? How sensitive to scratches are they? I've only used the cartridge ones. The discs will not be getting regular use.

Secondly, are there any issues with copying back the DVD-recorder files from the computer to a new DVD-RAM disc at some time in the future? I've heard of possible CPRM issues.
I think there are reliability issues with using any of the optical disc formats for long term archiving, and I have seen no evidence that DVD-RAM last any longer than the others. I have seen claims by manufacturers ranging from 30 to 100 years for DVD-R and DVD+R discs and up to 30 years for DVD-RW, DVD+RW and DVD-RAM. I don't personally believe they will last anything like that long.

You will need a special utility to copy VR mode recordings to DVD-RAM, I use VRCopy from Panasonic but you cant buy, it comes with certain products like DVD-Ram camcorders. If you do that then you can upload to the recorders HDD if it has one. If you just want data storage then I think XP can write directly to FAT32 formatted DVD-Ram. Vista and Linux can natively access UDF formatted DVD-Ram.
 

PhilipL

Well-known Member
Hi

DVD-RAM is reckoned to be far more robust than DVD-R. I am not worried about compatibility as I can always make a DVD-R if needed.

Wrong, that's just mis-leading marketing. DVD-RAM archive life is thought to be around 30 years, the same as DVD-RW and +RW. DVD-R/+R if stored correctly and good quality discs to start with should last 50 years or more.

You are much better off using write-once discs and keep a few copies of anything important and store them in different places and check regularly they are ok.

http://www.digitalfaq.com/media/longevity.htm

Regards

Phil
 

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