Answered Panasonic DMR-EX77EG - Power P.C.B. - KO...

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by Manete, Jun 7, 2015.

  1. Manete

    Manete
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    Hi everybody.
    I've just had an issue with my DMR-EX77EG.

    Yesterday night while I was watching TV I heard a noisy crack which could not tell where it came from exactly. It surely came from the Panny and TV "area" but as nothing important seemed to have happened (no smell, no smoke, everything working) I just kept on watching TV.

    However this morning, my wife turned it on, and watched something that had been recorded. Whe she finished watching TV, she put it on standby. One hour later, I tried to switch it on but it was not responding. I was able to see the clock (which was accurately working) but it just woulnd't turn on. I disconnected the main power cable and connected it again. To my surprise it did not turn on...no display, no start-up noise, nothing...
    Then I recalled last night's noise and understood it was surely related.

    I opened my panny and voilà, 3 capacitors are blown away in the Power Supply P.C.B.
    According to the service parts PDF I found for this unit, these are:
    Ref.No. Part No. Part Name & Description
    C1150 F2A1V6800002 35V 68P -->(68uF?)
    C1401 F2A0J1220028 6.3V 1200P -->(1200uF?)
    C1402 F2A0J3310059 6.3V 330U -->(330uF?)​
    I guess they all are 105º capacitors.

    I have some amateur experience with soldering, and, I was wondering if this may be an easy fix I could do on my own. The PCB does not look top-tech (like a PC motherboard), in fact it looks quite simple to repair (apparently).

    I just would like to know if I should need to consider other parts to be replaced, and if I should be careful with not "touching" an specific capacitor on the board (in order to prevent an electric hazard).

    From what I've read here, I also believe there won't be any issues related to my current contents in HDD...am I right?

    I attach some pictures here for you to see if there should something else which does not look ok.
    Thanks in advance for you help and advice.
    Cheers,

    POWER PCB
    [​IMG]

    C1401
    [​IMG]

    C1402
    [​IMG]

    C1150 and... D1155 looks very "dirty", I don't know what to think about it...
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2015
  2. Best Answer:
    Post #2 by Gavtech, Jun 7, 2015 (1 points)
  3. Gavtech

    Gavtech
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    Best Answer
    Yes they are all 105º capacitors. Consider nothing else but...and yes those are uF's

    Before dismantling, and after disconnecting all connections, push the power button. This should discharge anything stored in the PSU, albeit when there are faults charge can be maintained.

    Do you have a meter? You can check to see if any voltage remains on the larger capacitors.
    I have never found this a problem although this is not to say it should be ignored.

    It is hard to see from the pictures but the top of C1143 ( F2B2W4700003 450V 47uF) looks suspect to me. ( Going by the second picture)

    D1151 may be suspect. In fact any of the diodes associated with any the caps may be suspect, but there is nothing to lose by trying the caps replacement first.

    Replacement is easy. Observe polarity. The hardest part will be getting the old ones out. Use a solder sucker and/ or solder braid plus the application of a clean freshly tinned iron.

    Yes. This should have no impact on the HDD.
     
  4. Manete

    Manete
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    Thanks Gavtech for your expert advice & prompt answer!

    C1143 must be the "big" capacitor on top I guess... Indeed, it has a peculiar shape on top in picture 2. It depends on how the light reflects on it that it looks suspicious.
    Tomorrow morning I'll go and get these 4 capacitors and give it a try. Wow, C1143 is scary... :confused:

    An additional question, just in case this fix did not work, if I could get hold of another working EX77 device and just swapped the Power PCB, would there be any additional issue? (just like with HDD/Main PCB transplants). Mine is a DMR EX77EC-S and donor would be a cheap british DMR EX77EB-K

    Thanks a lot, again, as usual. :)
     
  5. Manete

    Manete
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    Hi!

    SUCCESS!!! :thumbsup: :clap:
    Eventually I just replaced the 3 capacitors for that the C1143 seemed to be fine after a closer inspection.
    At the local dealer they did not have both 6.3v 1200uF and 6.3V 330uF, so I took 16v 1200uF and 16V 330uF instead, which were slightly bigger. No issues whatsoever, because there was enough room for them on the PCB.
    Toughest part was removing the bridge connector between the Power PCB and Main PCB.

    Here you are some pics of the replaced capacitors:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Thanks Gavtech for all your advice!!
     
  6. David12K

    David12K
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    Hi there,
    I have the same issue with my DMR-EZ28
    My power PCB is exactly the same as the one shown above. The only cap which looks damaged is C1401. I ordered one of these but although I have a soldering iron, I've never used it.... What can go wrong eh..?!
    Rather than risk killing other components I have ordered a replacement board - more expensive than the capacitor but still cheaper than a new unit...
    My question - am I daft thinking it's hard replacing a capacitor? It's just a case of heating the solder and pulling it out isn't it? Then reheat with the new one in - probably using the same solder?
    I'll have a go anyway, and I'll have the replacement board to fall back on if I cause any damage. Any tips...?
    Many thanks!
    David
     
  7. Manete

    Manete
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    Hi David12K.

    I'm no expert at all when it comes to soldering / desoldering. However, these capacitors are quite big, that's why I decided to give it a try on my own.
    If you've never done it before... what can I say.. To me, it was quite easy.
    You only need an iron (with a clean tip), some good tin, and you're ready to go for this one. Don't re-use the current remaining tin on your PCB to resolder your new capacitor because otherwise failure is guaranteed.

    First, take a picture of your pcb and capacitor (just in case you need to check something), then plug in the iron to mains, wait for a while, heat the 2 solder legs of the capacitor you want to remove, and pull gently until it's out of the pcb.
    You only have to pay attention to the polarity of the capacitor, one leg is positive and the other is negative. You have to replace the new capacitor respecting that polarity (which is clearly stated in the capacitor itself, have a look at it).

    I would recommend you to have a look at a couple of YT videos and then, try it on your own.
    You've already ordered a brand new PCB, so there's nothing much to lose... and if it works, you may return that new PCB and feel like a technician for a day ;)

    As I said, these capacitors are big, so their tolerance to overheating when soldering them is acceptable. You'll know the capacitor has been properly soldered when you see that it does not wiggle and the soldered tin is smooth and shiny (similar to the other ones on your PCB) and it does not look like a matte ball or has a dirty matte/cracking surface look.

    Here's a couple of pictures of what you should not get after soldering the capacitor:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If it looks like that, desolder and try again.
    Once you finish, don't forget to cut both legs of the capacitor just a bit beyond the end of the soldering points.
    If you give it a try, let us know how you did!
    Good luck!!

    Cheers,
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2019
  8. David12K

    David12K
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    Thanks Manete!
    You have inspired me to try! I don't know of course, if the cap I can see is blown is the only issue. If it isn't, my DVD player won't work even if I fit it correctly...
    Hope to try tomorrow and will post again with the results....
    David
     
  9. David12K

    David12K
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    The replacement board arrived first - still not received the capacitor in fact. Board installed and..... unit still wouldn't power on :-(
    I was about to throw the machine through the window when the penny dropped. I had forgotten to plug the connector to the main circuit board back in.....
    Unit working fine now! :)
     

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