Painting a room for projector + screen.

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by dc007, Feb 19, 2001.

  1. dc007

    dc007
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    I'll be painting the walls and ceiling of my HT room soon. Any advice ? Matt, not gloss, naturally, but I guess rule of thumb is the darker the better ? Her indoors won't stand for black, surprise, surprise, but what other shades are advisable ? And which to avoid ?

    What colours have you guys used with success in an attempt to nullify the effects of ambient light and screen reflections ?

    Any thoughts appreciated....
     
  2. ROne

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    I went for quite a dark shade of violet. Which looks good in the day as a useable room and works well when darkened.

    I have red carpets and red curtains. It looks a bit twin peaks but it is not dull like a black room. I also painted the skirting and coving the same colour.

     
  3. Ludae

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    The room only realy needs to absolute black for when the lights are out and the movies playing. Why not use light coloured drapes and panels and have them motorised so that they will either reveal a totally black room or be obscurred by black material?
     
  4. Jenz

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    I also went for a very dark red/brown (Terracotta I think) that had a high WAF(Wife Acceptance Factor). As we also use the room for reading it was a bit of a compromise that worked well.

    HC Dude used Curtains on his walls, whilst this sounds a little odd it is very effective and actually very nice.

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  5. StephenR

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    Does this mean a room with white ceilings/walls would be unsuitable for a projector? I hope not. I'm sure I've seen HC installs with white ceilings. Would a low gain screen help matters?
     
  6. Jenz

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    StephenR,

    Not specifically but it does help reduce the levels of reflective light.

    You can go even further if you want by painting doors and skirting boards.
     
  7. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
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    Yes,

    White walls and ceilings aren't a good idea in a dedicated home cinema. Of course, the installs you see have to achieve the compromises the customer wants. Not everyone would like a living room that is as dark as a cinema!

    Gordon

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  8. Black 5

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    I know conventional wisdom says different, but the walls of my room are a light(ish) blue and I have a white suspended ceiling. The ceiling tiles were chosen to have low reflective qualities.

    I have to say, I don't find reflected light a problem - I am able to shut out natural light completely and I have dark curtains covering the windows on either side of the room and some which draw to the sides of the screen.

    It's all a bit of a compromise, but my experience is the room doesn't need to resemble a morgue to contribute to a good overall experience.
     
  9. Jenz

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  10. HT Dude

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    As Jenz mentioned above, since my home cinema room has no windows, I wanted to give it a bright feeling when we're not watching a movie. So I painted the walls magnolia.
    The carpet and ceiling are a navy blue colour. When we watch a movie, I draw Navy blue curtains which close to cover up all the walls. When open, the curtains could be pull-tied with one of those curtain holder type things to make them look nicer. But currently they are just hanging down and look fine. When closed they match the rest of the colour scheme - being navy blue - and since they are ruffled, help deaden the acoustics of the room. My curtains were £25 a pair and I had to buy 5 pairs. They were installed by a curtain expert who for £150 also supplied the fittings. The curtains all have nylon chords which you pull to open and close each pair.
    It works well, and when closed really make you feel like you're in a proper cinema.
    The only snag is speakers. Positioning wall-mounted speakers would have to be carefully planned so they don't interfere with the curtains or vice-versa.
    I'm currently investigating hanging speakers from the ceiling. Floor mounted speakers would need very heavy stands to prevent them from being knocked over by children.
     
  11. StephenR

    StephenR
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    There are pictures of what it can look like with white ceilings and walls at http://homepage.mac.com/ccrim/home-theatre/index.html

    You can see the light reflecting off the low ceiling, but I think it looks okay. It may get distracting after a while though, so as I'm unwilling to repaint my living room perhaps I should reconsider getting a projector [​IMG]
     
  12. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
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    Stephen,

    Don't re-considor. Just do it, trust me!

    The big thing about having white walls and ceilings is that the reflected light washes back on to the screen. Reducing the available contrast range. So, it makes it hard to get black "dark". Of course, the brighter your chosen projector is the worse it becomes......

    When Liam was up having a dem I think even he remarked that he couldn't believe just how much the wee Sanyo lit up our dem room, with the lights off. That room has no windows but a magnolia ceiling. The walls are deep terracotta and the carpet dark green (yes, it's as horrible as it sounds, but we're working on it!).

    Anyway, I've put Sony LCD's in new homes with standard magnolia walls and white ceilings and the clients have been "over the moon". Try it you might just love it.

    Gordon

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  13. StephenR

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    Thanks for that Gordon, I am feeling better about it now. The question is can I live WITHOUT a projector and I think the answer is no! My relatively new 36 inch widescreen TV doesn't seem good enough any more.

    So would a higher or lower gain screen be better for use in a room with light coloured walls and ceiling? I'm a bit confused about that. Thanks again.
     

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