oxidized cables. Help me!

senzaparole

Member
Hi guys, I have a problem with the speaker cables. I have a 5.1 system and am upgrading to a 5.1.4 system. I noticed that the copper wire oxidized within a few months. I'm afraid the sound will degrade over time. How can I solve?
Same thing for the stripped cable that is plugged into the Denon connectors.
I bought these cables and can't replace them anymore:

cables amazon.it
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
You could try immersing the cable ends in some Coca Cola for an hour, this will remove the oxidation. Dry the cables off and and fit QED Airlloc speaker plugs.
 

senzaparole

Member
but if I ignore the oxidation I risk degrading the sound? if I have no problems I do not care that the copper oxidizes
 

larkone

Member
Oxidation at the contact point will increase resistance.
 

senzaparole

Member
then I have to intervene.
The vinegar and the cocacola work but the problem will return.
On the other hand, does the "DeoxIT D series" definitively solve the problem?

Otherwise, I read, I have to use the pond. I have to cover the copper with tin
 

oscroft

Member
then I have to intervene.
The vinegar and the cocacola work but the problem will return.
On the other hand, does the "DeoxIT D series" definitively solve the problem?

Otherwise, I read, I have to use the pond. I have to cover the copper with tin
I always like to use use gold-plated connectors of some sort. I prefer banana plugs, but others prefer spade connectors. I put a bit of solder on them too, rather than just relying on the screw connectors.

In reality, I unplug and re-plug my speaker cables enough times per year to clean the contacts anyway. I've really never had a problem, not in decades.
 

senzaparole

Member
I even have speakers on the ceiling. In addition, the cable entering the Denon terminals also oxidizes. To clean the cables, I would waste too much time, each time, disconnecting all the speakers and the Denon.
 

mseve1

Active Member
I really wouldn't worry about this. I'm assuming that you're using bare wires into/around screw-down binding posts. Provided that the plastic nuts are screwed down tightly onto the wires there is practically no chance of signal degradation at the contact points even if any exposed wire becomes mildly oxidised.
So long as the connections aren't disturbed there should be no need for any ongoing maintenance but after several years you might want to trim back the exposed wire if re-connection is required.
 

mushii

Distinguished Member
The Airloc speaker plugs that I pointed you to are cold welded on, so there will be no further oxidation of the cables. The speaker plugs are gold plated so will not oxidise. Please take the time to read the advice that people are giving you.
 
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BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
You can clean the contact or in this case Wire with some very fine sand paper - like 400 or 600 grit. I've even done it by scraping with my pocket knife.

Though probably better to just cut 1" off the cable and strip the ends. Once the Copper is exposed, you could use a very thin layer of Dielectric Grease or Anti-seize compound. Wipe a bit on, give it a second or two, then wipe it off. Even if you wipe it off there will still be a thin coat on the wire.

I would suspect you could even use something like WD-40 assuming you wipe it off after you spray it.

I did find a copper based Anti-Seize Compound, massively more than you need, but still tolerably priced.

Amazon product
Let's see if I can find that in the UK -

Amazon product
This is enough to last more than a THOUSAND Lifetimes, so perhaps you can find it in smaller quantities for less money.

I suspect general Electrical Contact Cleaner with Lubricant would also protect the metal over time. Spray it on, then wipe it off, even after wiping there will still be a thin layer of Lubricant. This is pretty much any Contact Cleaner that claims to Lubricate and/or Protect.

If you use something like Banana Plugs, these hold the wire with Screws, and under the clamping pressure of the screw, it is not likely to oxidize even if the wire exposed to air is oxidizing.

Curious are you near the ocean/sea? It seems as if your wire is oxidizing pretty quickly.

I was able to find something called Dioxit SN5 Shield that is specifically meant to coat metal to prevent corrosion. That is, I found in the USA, but not in the UK. I suspect it is just a matter of finding the right phrase to search for though -

Amazon product
Typical Dioxit is the D-Series. The Dioxit Sheild is the S-Series, and also comes in a variety of types assuming you can find it in the UK/EU -


Many of the Dioxit products are on the expensive side, but you don't really need that much so these small amounts should be more than enough for your needs, and at a more reasonable price -



Just a few thoughts.

Steve/bluewizard
 
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dannnielll

Well-known Member
Hi .. there is no problem. If the wire is fresh clean copper, and is screwed down onto metal ..eg binding posts ,the pressure creates an air tight cold weld ,good for a full lifetime. The trick is that it must be tight enough to deform the copper. The Binding post holes are usually sharp enough,to make the pressure weld . The rest of the copper can go as green as it likes , it makes no matter . The entire Telecoms industry is or was based on this ..
 

senzaparole

Member
I really wouldn't worry about this. I'm assuming that you're using bare wires into/around screw-down binding posts. Provided that the plastic nuts are screwed down tightly onto the wires there is practically no chance of signal degradation at the contact points even if any exposed wire becomes mildly oxidised.
So long as the connections aren't disturbed there should be no need for any ongoing maintenance but after several years you might want to trim back the exposed wire if re-connection is required.
Hi .. there is no problem. If the wire is fresh clean copper, and is screwed down onto metal ..eg binding posts ,the pressure creates an air tight cold weld ,good for a full lifetime. The trick is that it must be tight enough to deform the copper. The Binding post holes are usually sharp enough,to make the pressure weld . The rest of the copper can go as green as it likes , it makes no matter . The entire Telecoms industry is or was based on this ..

This is certainly in theory. In practice, the speaker or Denon clamp does not have the exact same cable size. And the cable itself is made of several wires with air in between. Even if you squeeze a little bit of air tightly, it still oxidizes the copper. In fact, I had tightened the cables well. When I removed the speakers I noticed that all the cables were oxidized. Less than a year after assembly.
 

senzaparole

Member
[QUOTE = "mushii, post: 28587866, membro: 24354"]
The Airloc speaker plugs that I pointed you to are cold welded on, so there will be no further oxidation of the cables. The speaker plugs are gold plated so will not oxidise. Please take the time to read the advice that people are giving you.
[/QUOTE]

Hi thanks for the advice, do you mean these?

airloc qed
 
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senzaparole

Member
Though probably better to just cut 1" off the cable and strip the ends. Once the Copper is exposed, you could use a very thin layer of Dielectric Grease or Anti-seize compound. Wipe a bit on, give it a second or two, then wipe it off. Even if you wipe it off there will still be a thin coat on the wire.
I would suspect you could even use something like WD-40 assuming you wipe it off after you spray it.
I did find a copper based Anti-Seize Compound, massively more than you need, but still tolerably priced.
Amazon productLet's see if I can find that in the UK -
Amazon productThis is enough to last more than a THOUSAND Lifetimes, so perhaps you can find it in smaller quantities for less money.
Is this solution final or every year do I have to disassemble everything and use the product you are recommending on the cables?

If you use something like Banana Plugs, these hold the wire with Screws, and under the clamping pressure of the screw, it is not likely to oxidize even if the wire exposed to air is oxidizing.
I don't use banana plugs because the speakers are installed on the wall and I only have one cm of space from the wall

Curious are you near the ocean/sea? It seems as if your wire is oxidizing pretty quickly.
I live in the center of Northern Italy. The sea is 100 km away

I was able to find something called Dioxit SN5 Shield that is specifically meant to coat metal to prevent corrosion. That is, I found in the USA, but not in the UK. I suspect it is just a matter of finding the right phrase to search for though -
If this product definitively solves the oxidation problem I take it into consideration
 

mseve1

Active Member
You do not have a problem! Fasten the cables tightly in the binding posts and then forget about them. The exposed wire may change in appearance from shiny to dull but the electrical contact, and hence the sound, will not degrade over time.
 

dannnielll

Well-known Member
This is certainly in theory. In practice, the speaker or Denon clamp does not have the exact same cable size. And the cable itself is made of several wires with air in between. Even if you squeeze a little bit of air tightly, it still oxidizes the copper. In fact, I had tightened the cables well. When I removed the speakers I noticed that all the cables were oxidized. Less than a year after assembly.
Look it is a none problem. I have connections made 15 years ago, and only re connected at one end 2 years ago. I have other ones in use for decades .
 

Mark.Yudkin

Distinguished Member
If you don't have room for banana plugs and don't trust your ability to fasten the cables to the speakers, use spade lugs. If soldered or cold-welded, oxidation cannot occur and the cables will outlive your great great grandchildren untouched.
 

senzaparole

Member
If you don't have room for banana plugs and don't trust your ability to fasten the cables to the speakers, use spade lugs. If soldered or cold-welded, oxidation cannot occur and the cables will outlive your great great grandchildren untouched.

you understand my problem exactly. I want to feel safe. Could you link me the forks? thanks
 

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
You do not have a problem! ...

Clearly he does have a problem -

"I noticed that the copper wire oxidized within a few months."

Now we can't see the cables so we don't really know the degree of oxidation but clearly it is there, and clearly he is concerned about it.

Now you may have offered him a solutions, but I don't think you could or should deny that the problem exists.

They do make Right Angle Banana Plugs, though not being able to see the situation, hard to say if that would be a workable solution.


Again, hard to know for sure just how oxidized the cable was, which is why I asked if he was near the ocean. It appears he is not. But the wired seemed to oxidize pretty quickly which makes me wonder if there is some secondary factor that we don't know about.

None the less, he has a range of potential solutions to choose from. The best he can do is give them a try and see how it works out.

Peace.

Steve/bluewizard
 

mseve1

Active Member
Clearly he does have a problem -

"I noticed that the copper wire oxidized within a few months."

Now we can't see the cables so we don't really know the degree of oxidation but clearly it is there, and clearly he is concerned about it.

Now you may have offered him a solutions, but I don't think you could or should deny that the problem exists.

The oxidation of exposed copper wires may indeed be a concern to the OP but I maintain that this is not a problem. Provided that the connections to the binding posts are tight and secure then even severe surface oxidation will have absolutely no impact on the integrity of the electrical connection unless it is physically disturbed. It is of course prudent to clean or trim the cable prior to making a connection but, once made, any subsequent change in the appearance of the cable is of no consequence.
 
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senzaparole

Member
Here is a photo of the cables. After a few months since I made the connections, the cables are ALL reduced more or less like this. The part of the copper that was clamped by the terminals has also oxidized. Other cables are also slightly more oxidized than these in the photo

 

Mark.Yudkin

Distinguished Member

BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
Air Loc: Airloc ABS Wide Spade
Crimp & solder: Amazon productSimple: Amazon product, Amazon product
You can also google to find hits close to your home.
Remember that AirLoc connectors have to be crimped with a special tool . Though those that sell Airloc might be willing to crimp connectors to you cable. ... for a fee of course.

If you have the tools for soldering and you are pretty decent at soldering, you can solder Screw type banana plugs, and like screw type Spade connectors. Or you can buy Spades that are specifically meant to be soldered.

Amazon product
Amazon product
HKSMAN U Shape Plug 4 Pcs 45 Degree Full Copper Gold: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

4 Angled Speaker Spade Terminal Connectors Screw Gold: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

Vimmor Y Plug 4 Pcs 45 Degree Nakamichi Speaker Banana: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics

You can tell that for some of these, they are intended to hold the wire with a couple of screw, but someone good at soldering would have no problem turning these into solder connections.

From the Photo provided by the Original Poster, the wire does not look that corroded. It is probably fine.

Clean it off, and reconnect it. Perhaps some type of seal (WD-40, dialectic grease, anti-seize, or similar) would help stave of future corrosion. I've not tried it because I've not had the problem.

Dioxit, as far as I can tell, is corrosion prevention as well as corrosion removal. There is the Dioxit Sheild which also comes is small low cost tube, and it is certainly to prevent future corrosion.

Also any Contact Cleaner that says it cleans and Protects likely has some corrosion inhibitors.

Keep in mind that the use would be rare, so a small low cost tube would last a long time.

Just a few thoughts.
 

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