Overclocking Pentium D

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by meansizzler, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. meansizzler

    meansizzler
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    OK since I got a New case My Pentium D temp has dropped by 15 degrees idle, so I thoguht I would go for an overclock, want to get it to 3.4GHZ...

    Mobo: Asus P5LD2-VM
    Memory: Crucial Ballsix DDR2 667
    CPU: Pentium D 830 "3GHZ Stock"

    Anyway in the Bios I have a few overclocking function, one is automatic so just select how much you want to overclcok by eg . 5%, 10%, 20% and so on, anyway I selected 10% and CPU runs fine at 3.3GHZ...no heat related issues, but trouble is the Memory Speed drops from 667MHZ to 533MHZ, and don't see an option to change it back, so I go to manual overclock and I can unlock the multiplier, and type in the FSB manually, but again memory speeds drop to 533MHZ, anyone know How I would get it back up to 667MHZ?...also would I need to mess with the CPU voltage?, so far just leaving it alone....also Multipler is set at 15X, would I need to change it to get the best overclock?...
     
  2. sbowler

    sbowler
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    I think you would be better posting here. [Link Removed]
     
  3. sbowler

    sbowler
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    Ooops link not allowed, sorry if I breached the rules. I was only thinking that members on this site may not have the depth of knowledge in PC overclocking. The link was not made to offend or upset anyone, but to help a member obtain more thorough information. I hang my head in shame.:oops:
     
  4. meansizzler

    meansizzler
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    PM Link?
     
  5. The Dude

    The Dude
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    Are things really getting that bad around here these days? :confused:
     
  6. Bl4ckGryph0n

    Bl4ckGryph0n
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    I've got my P4D820 running at 3.4....I'm also using 667Mhz memory and found that lowering the memory speed makes it very stable, and you don't notice the drop in speed anyway...You should be able to get yours up to 3.5/3.6 easily and the memory won't be the bottleneck....
     
  7. meansizzler

    meansizzler
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    well I can get it to 3.3 and its fine using the automatic Overlock which raises the FSB to 224 "10% Overclock", Anyway when I Increase the FSB to 230 "3.45GHZ" then it fails to boot the system, bad overlock it says..., anyone know why?...
     
  8. arfster

    arfster
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    Your motherboard might not go that fast. I've got a 805 which will overclock to 3.8ghz, but that's because it uses a *20 multiplier. Thus for 3.8ghz, I only need 190mhz FSB.

    Might be an idea to have a look at the voltages. Be careful though.
     

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