1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Out of warranty? So what,still their problem.

Discussion in 'Satellite TV, Sky TV & FreeSat' started by Keithcun, Jun 29, 2005.

  1. Keithcun

    Keithcun
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    152
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    My Pace V2.0 is now 16 months old and over the last 6 weeks been getting an intermittent fault of "No Signal Being Recieved" .

    After a phone call to Sky+ they sent an engineer out to have a look at it on a FREE service call out because I said I wasn't prepared to pay for a call out after the usual rigmorole of going through the question and answer session about the warranty.I told her that it didn't matter that my box was out of warranty and 16 months isn't a reasonable time for equipment like this to last,and it was no surprise she didn't have a clue about my rights as a purchaser,but she did agree that someone would be sent out free of charge.

    Had an engineer out on Monday morning to sort my "No Signal Being Recieved" problem" All he did was change the connectors into the LNB and left.The signal was aroung 50%,quality and strength before he came and the same when he left.The problem only seems to arrive mid afternoon when the sun has been beating down on the dish.

    Anyway,a couple of hours after he left,mid afternoon,the fault arrived again and I was getting no signal to either input.

    Rung Sky+ again and went through the warranty rubbish again and told them the engineer had been out,changed a couple of connectors and left.The system was OK when he came,OK when he left but the problem was still there at certain times.Pretty much said that the engineer was a waste of time.He never checked the dish for alignment or the LNB as far as I was aware.

    So she said that they would arrange another engineer to come out and I told her I wasn't prepared to pay the call out charge and she agreed as the initial fault hadn't been solved.

    Engineer came this morning (Wednesday) so I told him the problem and said that an engineer had been on Monday but only changed the connectors and left it virtually as it was.He hooked his gear up to the inputs at the STB end and said that he would change the LNB for a new one which he did.When he came back in the house he said he had also realligned the dish as it was slightly out and he had another box in his hand.He said he had a refurb unit and was I prepared to have it swapped,so I agreed.He swapped the STB over ,another Pace V2.0 and set it up and matched the card up to the new box.The signal was now 80-90 % on both strength and quality on both inputs,something that it had never been before.He then bid me farewell and left.

    So now I'm happy again.

    The moral of the story is,that some engineers are a damn sight better than others and don't be fobbed off when they try and tell you that your box is out of warranty and it is your problem.It's not,it's their problem.

    If anyone wants any advice as to their rights as a purchaser have a look at the following link,it could save you money.

    http://www.dti.gov.uk/ccp/topics1/facts/salegoodsact.htm
     
  2. GGTVBD

    GGTVBD
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Messages:
    3,365
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Bradford, West Yorkshire.
    Ratings:
    +323
    Well done on getting the job done FOC. :thumbsup:

    As far as The Sale of Goods Act is concerned though, I don't think that's what made them do the job. There are so many loopholes in the 'SOGA' which any company can easily exploit.

    The ONLY reason Sky did the job for nowt was to keep access to your bank account.

    A. Dork
     
  3. Bluevanman

    Bluevanman
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Is your car still in warrenty? If not, do you expect the manufacturer to fix it free? Of course not. So why should you expect Sky to give you a free service call when your box is out of warrenty?
     
  4. Keithcun

    Keithcun
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    152
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    Because it's my right and they have failed their terms of the contract.

    Read up on the Sales of Goods Act before having a dig,but to save you looking it up on Google,here it is in part.

    http://www.dti.gov.uk/ccp/topics1/facts/salegoodsact.htm

    Hopefully the more people who read and understand this,then the less that major companies will walk all over you who don't know their rights.I have highlighted relevant parts.No probs if you want to apologise.


    Subject: Sale of Goods Rights, Faulty Goods.

    Relevant or Related Legislation: Sale of Goods Act 1979. Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982. Sale and Supply of Goods Act 1994. The Sale and Supply of Goods to Consumers Regulations 2002.

    Key Facts

    • Wherever goods are bought they must "conform to contract". This means they must be as described, fit for purpose and of satisfactory quality (i.e. not inherently faulty at the time of sale).

    • Goods are of satisfactory quality if they reach the standard that a reasonable person would regard as satisfactory, taking into account the price and any description.

    • Aspects of quality include fitness for purpose, freedom from minor defects, appearance and finish, durability and safety.

    • It is the seller, not the manufacturer, who is responsible if goods do not conform to contract.

    • If goods do not conform to contract at the time of sale, purchasers can request their money back "within a reasonable time". (This is not defined and will depend on circumstances)

    • For up to six years after purchase (five years from discovery in Scotland) purchasers can demand damages (which a court would equate to the cost of a repair or replacement).

    • A purchaser who is a consumer, i.e. is not buying in the course of a business, can alternatively request a repair or replacement.

    • If repair and replacement are not possible or too costly, then the consumer can seek a partial refund, if they have had some benefit from the good, or a full refund if the fault/s have meant they have enjoyed no benefit

    • In general, the onus is on all purchasers to prove the goods did not conform to contract (e.g. was inherently faulty) and should have reasonably lasted until this point in time (i.e. perishable goods do not last for six years).

    • If a consumer chooses to request a repair or replacement, then for the first six months after purchase it will be for the retailer to prove the goods did conform to contract (e.g. were not inherently faulty)

    • After six months and until the end of the six years, it is for the consumer to prove the lack of conformity.

    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Q1. What is an inherent fault?
    Q2. Do I only have rights for 30 [or some other number] days after purchase?
    Q3. Do all goods have to last six (or five) years?
    Q4. I know I can demand my money back within a "reasonable time" but how long is that?
    Q5. After the "reasonable time has passed", what can I do?
    Q6. Is it true that I have to complain to the manufacturer?
    Q7. Do I have to produce a receipt?
    Q8. Can I claim a refund on sale items?
    Q9. Must I accept a credit note instead of a refund?
    Q10. What can I do to claim damages or if the retailer will not honour my rights?
    Q11. The retailer has claimed that a repair is "disproportionately costly" and insists I accept a replacement as an alternative. Must I accept this?
    Q12. Neither repair nor replacement are possible. What can I do?
    Q13. What will the "reversed burden of proof" mean for the consumer

    Q1. What is an inherent fault?

    A fault present at the time of purchase. Examples are:
    • an error in design so that a product is manufactured incorrectly
    • an error in manufacturing where a faulty component was inserted.
    The "fault" may not become apparent immediately but it was there at the time of sale and so the product was not of satisfactory standard.

    Q2. Do I only have rights for 30 (or some other figure) days after purchase?

    No. Depending on circumstances, you might be too late to have all your money back after this time, but the trader will still be liable for any breaches of contract, such as the goods being faulty. In fact, the trader could be liable to compensate you for up to six years.

    Q3. Are all goods supposed to last six (or five) years?

    No, that is the limit for bringing a court case in England and Wales (five years from the time of discovery in Scotland's case). An item only needs to last as long as it is reasonable to expect it to, taking into account all the factors. An oil filter would usually not last longer than a year but that would not mean it was unsatisfactory.


    Q4. I know I can demand my money back within a "reasonable time" but how long is that?

    The law does not specify a precise time as it will vary for most sales contracts as all the factors need to be taken into account to be fair to all sides. The pair of everyday shoes may only have a few days before the period expires but a pair of skis, purchased in a Summer Sale, may be allowed a longer period by a court.

    Q5. After the "reasonable time" has passed, what can I do?

    You may seek damages, which would be the amount of money necessary to have the goods repaired or replaced. Frequently retailers will themselves offer repair or replacement. But, if you are a consumer (not making the purchase in the course of a business) you have the statutory right to seek a repair or replacement as an alternative to seeking damages.

    Q6. Is it true that I have to complain to the manufacturer?

    No. You bought the goods from the trader, not the manufacturer, and the trader is liable for any breaches of contract (unless he was acting as the manufacturer's agent).

    Q7. Do I have to produce a receipt to claim my rights?

    No. In fact the trader doesn't have to give you a receipt in the first place so it would be unfair to say that you had to produce one. However, it might not be unreasonable for the shop to want some proof of purchase, so look to see if you have a cheque stub, bank statement, credit card slip etc., and this should be sufficient.

    Q8. Can I claim a refund on sale items?

    It depends on why you want to return them. The Sale of Goods Act still applies, but you are not entitled to a refund if you were told of the faults before purchase, or if the fault should have been obvious to you. Also, you are not entitled to a refund if you simply change your mind about liking the goods.

    Q9. Must I accept a credit note instead of a refund?

    It depends on why you want to return the goods.

    • If you have changed your mind, then the shop doesn't have to do anything.

    • But if the goods are faulty, incorrectly described or not fit for purpose, then you are entitled to your money back (provided you act quickly), and you certainly don't have to take a credit note

    • If you do accept a credit note in these circumstances, watch out, as there may be restrictions on their use.

    • If the shop displays a sign stating they only give credit notes instead of refunds, they might be breaking the law and you could report them to your local Trading Standards Department.

    Q10. What can I do to claim damages or if the retailer will not honour my rights?

    The Small Claims Court procedure provides the means to bring a claim, for up to £5000 (in England and Wales), at modest cost and without the need for a solicitor. Your local Citizens Advice Bureau can advise on how to make a claim.

    Q11. The retailer has said that a repair is "disproportionately costly" and insists I accept a replacement as an alternative. Must I accept this?

    Yes, and vice versa if you request a replacement and this is "disproportionately costly". However, remember any remedy has to be carried out "without significant inconvenience" and within a "reasonable time" for the consumer. Remember that you could also seek damages instead.

    Q12. Neither repair nor replacement of the goods are possible. What can I do?

    You may either pursue the old route of damages or a partial or full refund. Probably either would give you exactly the same amount of money. You would seek a full refund in scenarios such as those where you had enjoyed absolutely no benefit from the goods. If you had benefited from them then you would seek a partial refund as a fair remedy. This is exactly the reasoning that would be employed if you sought damages.

    Q13. What does the "reversed burden of proof" mean for the consumer?

    It means that for the first six months the consumer need not produce any evidence that a product was inherently faulty at the time of sale. If a consumer is seeking any other remedy the burden of proof remains with him/her.

    In such a case, the retailer will either accept there was an inherent fault, and will offer a remedy, or he will dispute that it was inherently flawed. If the latter, when he inspects the product to analyse the cause, he may, for example, point out impact damage or stains that would be consistent with it having been mistreated in such a way as to bring about the fault.

    This reversal of the usual burden of proof only applies when the consumer is seeking a repair or replacement. After the first six months the onus of proof is again on the consumer.
     
  5. Starburst

    Starburst
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2000
    Messages:
    17,838
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Ilkeston
    Ratings:
    +979
    If only it was that simple.

    Even if you could get someone to explain all the lawyer speak in the act you would still then have to go to court, pay for experts and argue your case if either the retailer or manufacturer disputed your position.

    I would rather see a flat 2 or 3 year no argument warranty for all consumer goods.
    Good for the enviroment as well, too many things are made to be replaced within a short space of time, throw away culture taken to extremes:(
     
  6. GGTVBD

    GGTVBD
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Messages:
    3,365
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Bradford, West Yorkshire.
    Ratings:
    +323
    The Sale of Goods Act is all well and good but try enforcing it. :rotfl:

    Once again - the ONLY reason Sky did your repair for free was to keep access to your bank account. The Sale of Goods Act had absolutely nothing to do with it. Believe me, they couldn't care less about it. :devil: If it wasn't for your subscriptions, they'd have told you to p*ss off.

    Most of us have already read the SOGA and are very familiar with it as it's been discussed on here many times before. Thanks for taking the time to refresh our memories. :rolleyes:

    I agree with Starburst (for once) :eek: but a 2 or 3 year guarantee should be standard on anything we buy.
     
  7. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Messages:
    9,748
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +270
    At the risk of being accused of "newbie bashing", I'd hazard a guess that Keithcun also believes that ID cards are entirely necessary, and well worth £300 a head :)
     
  8. Keithcun

    Keithcun
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    152
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    Say what you want as I couldn't care less and I don't care to be honest what Sky's reasons were for replacing the stuff for free as long as I don't have to pay for their shoddy work,and I didn't and that's all that matters to me.

    Just curious as to why there is dozens of posts on here where people are complaining because they have to pay out to have stuff replaced and repaired by Sky.Do they not have subscriptions. ;)

    Next you'll be telling me that the STB for Sky+ are fault free and no one has had any problems other than me.

    I wonder what Courts reasons were for fixing a £400 Zanussi washing machine that was over 8 months out of warranty,free of charge were, because I never had any kind of subscription with them. ;)

    Ah well,you suckers keep paying,it doesn't bother me. :rotfl: :rotfl:
     
  9. Daddy k

    Daddy k
    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Messages:
    9,044
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    coventry
    Ratings:
    +1,345
    here here
    they will always try it on unless your clever enough to highlight your rights.
    you dont buy a sky box to last a year! full stop! 3 maybe, i mean its not like a mobile or something where things are always changing etc.
    and if my washing machine breaks down before 2 years all hell will break loose in the store i got it from.
    were basically not buying something were as good as hiring an item for a year (or as long as the standard warranty is) as that must be what they expect it to last before we hand it over to the rubbish tip,and if it lasts any longer than the warranty then its a bonus ur hiring it a little bit longer for free.

    consumers are too weak we should fight and say before were buying such and such an item we want it with these "reasonable" terms
     
  10. GGTVBD

    GGTVBD
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Messages:
    3,365
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Location:
    Bradford, West Yorkshire.
    Ratings:
    +323
    Keithcun tut tut tut :nono:

    You must be a barrel of laughs. :D

    Lighten up buddy, you'll have a coronary! :)

    A. Dork
     
  11. Keithcun

    Keithcun
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    152
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    Cheers Arthur and I am a barrel of laughs as long as it doesn't cost me any money. ;) :rotfl: :rotfl:
     
  12. Bluevanman

    Bluevanman
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    When Sky charge £65.00 for an out of warrenty service call, it is a call out charge. The faulty equipment is replaced at NO EXTRA COST. As far as I can see, call out charges are not covered by the SOGA. If you had been charged more than this, then you would have a point. This applies whether the equipment is one day out of warrenty, or six years.
     
  13. Keithcun

    Keithcun
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    152
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    OK,I'll send them a cheque for £65.
     
  14. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Messages:
    9,748
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +270
    You've got the wrong box then - the cheapskates choose Freeview :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
     
  15. scitech

    scitech
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Ahh, but they don't offer the possibility of sending a box back without the call-out do they? If I took something back to Woolworths that was out of warranty they could test it in store at no cost to me. It's not even like Sky are adept at recognising faults over the phone, they just have the standard "switch the box off at the mains, do a Full System Reset, OK, you have to have someone out." Most (I hestaite to say all) other electrical manufacturers have knowledgeable, qualified technical support personnel that can identify a fault over the phone - I've experienced this first hand from budget brands like LiteOn right up to folk like Panasonic and Sony, even after a product has been discontinued in some cases. Postage on a Sky+ would be considerably less than £65 I reckon.
     
  16. Keithcun

    Keithcun
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    152
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    Beat me to it.The call out is the way Sky work and as Scitech has said,in other cases,like I have had with a graphics card only last week,then a return to base is how they fix it.And when I returned my graphics card the other week,it was all set up by PC Component Centre and it didn't cost me a penny as they sent a courier to pick it up.
     
  17. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Messages:
    9,748
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +270
    There is a rather large difference between a PC graphics card and a sophisticated computer controlled satellite receiver ! :rolleyes:

    As we see in this forum every day, Sky boxes can suffer from a variety of problems, and these can often be cured with simple techniques. Returning the box to Sky every time there is a small problem would be an inconvenience to all involved.

    If a customer were to be able to return his/her box to Sky instead of a callout charge, what would they gain ? Nothing ! Because they would then be spending £20 to £40 a month for a service which they cannot receive ! Sky's repair policy ensures minimum disruption to the customers' service at a reasonable price. Try getting a plumber out for £65 ! :suicide: Of course, you are not forced to use Sky to repair out-of-warranty boxes - you can take the box to any repairer that you want.
     
  18. Keithcun

    Keithcun
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    152
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    Not quite sure where you are coming from.

    I stated in my post that Sky's preference is to send someone out to repair it,but other companies (and I was using an example) have a return policy and it doesn't matter if it's a graphics card or a TV.

    What has a plumber got to do with this argument,as this is about the Sales of Goods Act.

    Why would you get someone else to repair your Sky box when you can get Sky to do it for nothing.
     
  19. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Messages:
    9,748
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +270
    I think it was established about 6 posts back that Sky will repair your box FOC, to maintain access to your bank account. Still, if you prefer to think it's solely down to your excellent legal and negotiating skills, then feel free to do so, if it makes you feel superior.

    I'm fully aware of the Sale of Goods act - I don't need a lecture from you, thanks.

    I suspect that the word that I have in my head right now, and the word that the Sky rep had after the phone conversation with Keithcun may well be the same :censored: :suicide:
     
  20. scitech

    scitech
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Firstly, a graphics card can be just as temperamental as a Sky+ box if it's malfunctioning.

    Secondly, regarding the point you make about problems with Sky+ being cured with simple techniques. How often is a fault completely and permanently fixed by rebooting or doing a Full System Reset? From what I can tell from threads here, the problem is resolved temporarily at best. Plus, you have proved the point about Sky+ not being sold fit for purpose. How many people have to format their PC hard drive once a month to ensure reliable use? How often does 10% of your PC HDD space just disappear? Windows XP doesn't even lock up and require a hard reset as often as previous versions of windows.

    Don't get me wrong, I love Sky+ but Sky's arrogance in refusing to acknowledge bugs in the system that everybody on this forum knows about is totally wrong. How often have they taken £65 off someone because their system developed an inherent fault that could materialise at any time in the box's life span?
     
  21. Bluevanman

    Bluevanman
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    This is the crucial paragraph. After 16 months of use you could not argue that the box was inherently faulty.
    Secondly, in your original post you said that the second guy that came out said that the fault was with the dish,ie he changed the LNB and realigned it.So cut the barrack room laywer crap and be happy that you have got a working system again.
     
  22. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Messages:
    9,748
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +270
    Possibly, but a Sky+ box is 100 times more complex.

    Well, if the boxes were as unreliable as you make them sound, I might agree, but the people who post here are the exception, not the rule. I've had a Sky+ box for over a year, and I've never had a problem with it. When you consider the complex programming that goes into a Sky+ box, it isn't surprising that the odd "glitch" occurs, but that doesn't make the box as unsuitable for its intended use.
     
  23. scitech

    scitech
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Why the hell not? Obviously you work for Sky so you might feel you have a duty to defend them, fine. But imagine a tyre on your lovely blue van is made with too thin rubber, after sixteen months of use (far below the lifespan of an average tyre) the rubber wears through, the trye bursts and you crash your van breaking every bone in your body. Do you just shrug your shoulders (probably not if they're broken :D ) say 'hey, **** happens' and enjoy a few months off work canvalescing? No, you'd take the tyre company to court for every penny they have, right?
     
  24. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Messages:
    9,748
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +270
    The tyre would only be "inherently faulty" if 100 other vans had crashed in the same way because of the inherent fault. "Inherent" means that it is a characteristic of the tyre to fail like that. If it was a one-off crash, then there could well be other factors which had caused the tyre to fail.
     
  25. scitech

    scitech
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    So, you've never, ever had to perform a Full System Reset. I have a relatively trouble free Sky+ life but it get's to a point about once a month where every recording starts to fail, space on the drive goes missing and an FSR sorts it out.

    I guess this is the consequence of constantly writing and rewriting sectors of a HDD, especially one that is constantly nearly full. On a PC a defrag would sort out any performance issues but that isn't an option on Sky+. I tend to find planner rebuilds totally ineffectual, given the time it takes them to complete, I wonder what they actually do.
     
  26. scitech

    scitech
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    OK, assume it was a whole batch of tyres made with thin rubber. I'm not worrying about semantics, my point is that an inherent fault devolping after 16 months is not beyond the realms of probabilty and neither would it be unprovable.
     
  27. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Messages:
    9,748
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +270
    No, never. I have a (personally fitted) 200GB drive which is always about 50% full, and have had no problems with it in nearly a year. I have had to do a few "soft resets" in the past, but then again, I have to do it on my PC far more often :)
     
  28. Nick_UK

    Nick_UK
    Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2004
    Messages:
    9,748
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Ratings:
    +270
    Yes, but an inherent fault is one that affects a large percentage of items. Given the number of Sky boxes that are out there, the couple of dozen people a week that post problems on here is insignificant.
     
  29. Keithcun

    Keithcun
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    152
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    So why did Courts repair my washing machine FOC when it was over 8 months out of warranty.What kind of subscription do you think I was paying them.The washing machine had been paid for in full on purchase.

    Sorry as I've already mentioned the above fact but people don't seem to realise that the SOGA can work in your favour.

    Isn't it great that I have got under so many peoples skin with this topic.

    Is it because I used my nous and got something repaired FOC whereas they may have had to pay because they were weak in the negotiations over call out charges etc.

    Anyway,you suckers keep paying for it,it's no skin off my nose. :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:
     
  30. Keithcun

    Keithcun
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    152
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +4
    I didn't say the box was faulty, I argued that the system they supplied was faulty and it was easy to argue as the bloody thing wasn't working.

    I would have been happy for him to leave the box I had if the signal strength and quality improved.

    If the engineer thought that the new LNB and dish alignment would rid me of all faults,then why did he bring me in a new STB without any prompting?Maybe it's because,as a Sky+ engineer,he knew that there are numerous faults with these systems.

    As the first engineer said to me 2 days previous when he left "I'll see you soon,well,you have got Sky+"
     

Share This Page

Loading...