Our new oven triggers "protection mode" on my Denon AVR!!??

ddlooping

Active Member
Hi all :)

For a few weeks, my Denon AVR 3600 has been going into protection mode somewhat randomly (or so we thought).
But it seems not to be random at all and is linked to our new oven, which I've realised when I installed it, is on the same circuit as the plugs in our living room!!??

The amp has never gone in protection mode when the oven is not in use (that we can remember).
Since we've realised the problem might be due to the oven...
  • the amp went in protection mode when the oven beeped to let us know the cooking time was over (2 times )
  • it did when the oven beeped to let us know it had reached the desired temperature (1 time)
  • it did when my partner opened the oven door, which stops its fan (1 time)
During the writing of this post I decided to try and make sure we weren't imagining things.
I started the oven in pre-heating mode.
When it beeped to let us know it had reached temperature I switched it to the normal cooking mode.... the amp went.

....

Hours after I wrote all the above, it happened again as we opened the oven door after it had reached temperature.

What could be the problem and how can I fix it, preferably cheaply?
Would plugging the amp into a surge protector do the trick?
 

Jase

Distinguished Member
Hmm...I think I'd get an electrician in to check the house circuit/wiring and the oven wiring.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
Your kitchen should be on a separate ring main and the cooker should have a dedicated outlet with its own fuse on the fuse board/consumer unit.


You need to call an electrician to come look at your home's electrics.


The cooker and your AV receiver or other domestic appliances should not be sharing the same ring main!
 
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John7

Well-known Member
Are you sure your oven is on the same circuit as the Amp? Ovens usually have a dedicated high power supply (45 Amps) and you normal sockets should not be connected to this.

It could be that you have a low power, plug-in (rather than hard wired) oven of 2Kw or so - that type would be OK to connect to the same circuit as the Amp

How many Watts is your oven rated at? Is it just an oven or electric hob as well?
 

ddlooping

Active Member
Thanks for the replies :)

Your kitchen should be on a separate ring main and the cooker should have a dedicated outlet with its own fuse on the fuse board/consumer unit.
That's what I thought
Are you sure your oven is on the same circuit as the Amp?
Yep
It could be that you have a low power, plug-in (rather than hard wired) oven of 2Kw or so - that type would be OK to connect to the same circuit as the Amp
It is hard wired...
 

John7

Well-known Member
Hmm - it's rated at 16 Amps. My advice would be to get an electrician to check your wiring circuits out and recommend a safe solution.
 

Mark.Yudkin

Distinguished Member
Also, the oven is obligated to have circuitry to ensure it does not interfere with other devices in the house. You need call in the installer as something is badly wrong.
 

MaryWhitehouse

Well-known Member
All the above plus corn flakes till resolved please!
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
It sounds like the oven is putting a nice big inductive spike onto your mains line when it switches on and off. My daughter has a fridge in her bedroom that does the same, putting a very audible "click" through the hifi in the lounge.

Worth checking the connections to the over are tight, but a surge / noise filtering mains adapter for your amplifier might well be the solution.
 

ddlooping

Active Member
Thanks @noiseboy72 :)

Can you recommend a surge / noise filtering mains adapter?
Are the cheap, multi-plugs surge protectors any good or do I need to spend much more?
 

MaryWhitehouse

Well-known Member
Shouldn’t be needed once ovens on the spur it should be on.
 

John7

Well-known Member
Get the circuit(s) sorted first! You may not need a filter. The oven should be on it's own circuit. We don't know what else the existing circuit may be supplying (apart from the Amp).
 

ddlooping

Active Member
Shouldn’t be needed once ovens on the spur it should be on.
True, but in the meantime I'd like to be able to use and protect my AVR (and other equipment that might suffer silently from these spikes). ;)
I was just wondering if a cheap power strip with surge protection would do the job until we get an electrician to come and fix the problem.
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
I agree that the oven really should not be doing this - and I am not convinced that just putting it onto its own spur will cure the problem. It could be a fault within the oven, so worth a sparkie visiting and seeing if they can measure this.

Cheap surge protection plugs normally work once or twice before giving up the ghost. The proper route might be the devices you fit into the distribution board, as these are rated for repeated surges. Provided your board is reasonably modern and has the space, expect to pay £30 - £80 for the protection device, plus fitting.
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
I agree that the oven really should not be doing this - and I am not convinced that just putting it onto its own spur will cure the problem.


I don't think anyone suggested that it would? Ovens are ordinarily connected directly to the consumer unit and not to the ring main. They usually have their own fuse on the fuse board. A spur would just be a spur off from the ring main.

Also note that although not compulsary, a kitchen usually has its own ring main seperate from that used by other areas in the house.
 
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ddlooping

Active Member
UPDATE

The oven has been transferred to the same circuit as the hob (on a separate ring) a few days ago and the problem hasn't occurred since. :)
Let's hope it's a permanent fix.

Thanks to all of you for the feedback/suggestions. ;)
 

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