Oppo 971H - Static shock!

witters

Member
Just got this unit. When I go to the machine I get a shock, presumably static. This also happend wih the Cambridge DVD89 for the short period I had it.

Is there any way of stopping this? Would earthing it to my AV amp give the desired result?
 

Daneel

Active Member
witters said:
Is there any way of stopping this? Would earthing it to my AV amp give the desired result?
I would think so, yes.

BTW, what didn't you like about the DVD89?
 

bcopping

Active Member
I am getting static from my sky box. I think it is because of figure 8 power cables dont have an earth so any static will build up.

I am thinking of creating a new cable with 3 cores and screwing the earth into one of the case mounting screws. But then if your amplifier is earthed your plan will probably work as well.
 

AndyC_772

Active Member
I doubt very much there's a lot you can do about it - but there is a misconception here.

When the equipment is sitting on the shelf, it's not building up a static charge of its own. (Of course, if it has faulty power supply insulation then it could give you a buzz from the mains, but that's a separate issue - you'd need to find the faulty piece of kit and get it fixed).

You, however, are building up a charge, every time you move two insulating materials against each other. Walking about wearing clothes works well! When you then touch your equipment, the charge is transferred from you to your hi-fi.

I've been getting a lot more static shocks since I bought my Denon DVD-2900, the only piece of equipment in my rack that actually has an earth connection. It means there's now a path from any of the metal parts of my kit, through the interconnects, through the Denon and to earth.

If your equipment has NO earth, then you probably won't get static shocks when you touch it, because there's no direct path to earth through it.

The static discharge is harmless to you and your equipment. Every piece of kit has to be tested for ESD immunity under the EMC Directive, and the CE mark on the back means it's passed that and other tests. You might hear a brief click on audio, that's all.

My advice? Make sure your listening room isn't full of gas or petrol vapour, and live with it :D
 

lardy

Standard Member
AndyC_772 said:
I doubt very much there's a lot you can do about it - but there is a misconception here.
When the equipment is sitting on the shelf, it's not building up a static charge of its own. (Of course, if it has faulty power supply insulation then it could give you a buzz from the mains, but that's a separate issue - you'd need to find the faulty piece of kit and get it fixed).
You, however, are building up a charge, every time you move two insulating materials against each other. Walking about wearing clothes works well! When you then touch your equipment, the charge is transferred from you to your hi-fi.
I've been getting a lot more static shocks since I bought my Denon DVD-2900, the only piece of equipment in my rack that actually has an earth connection. It means there's now a path from any of the metal parts of my kit, through the interconnects, through the Denon and to earth.
If your equipment has NO earth, then you probably won't get static shocks when you touch it, because there's no direct path to earth through it.
The static discharge is harmless to you and your equipment. Every piece of kit has to be tested for ESD immunity under the EMC Directive, and the CE mark on the back means it's passed that and other tests. You might hear a brief click on audio, that's all.
My advice? Make sure your listening room isn't full of gas or petrol vapour, and live with it :D
absolutely correct, except that you can disharge yourself to an unearthed metallic (or even non-metallic) object with a capactiance (as the electrons on you or it want to find their lowest level so to speak). You could touch a radiator or another earthed object first and discharge yourself before touching the unit in question or take off your nylon undies/DocMartens/acrylic jumper. You should find that the problem gets worse when the weather is dry and clear and better when its a bit muggy....... :smashin: If you do have a fire in your AV/Hifi I can come and tell you why.....:lesson: :smashin:
 

gkinghrn

Active Member
witters said:
Just got this unit. When I go to the machine I get a shock, presumably static. This also happend wih the Cambridge DVD89 for the short period I had it.

Is there any way of stopping this? Would earthing it to my AV amp give the desired result?
SERIOUSLY - Water your carpet once a week with a gentle mist spray..takes th dryness out of it and shoudl leave you static free..don't believe me..try it:smashin:
 

lardy

Standard Member
gkinghrn said:
SERIOUSLY - Water your carpet once a week with a gentle mist spray..takes th dryness out of it and shoudl leave you static free..don't believe me..try it:smashin:
you could always walk round dragging a chain behind you..... call me Igor.... :D
 

gkinghrn

Active Member
lardy said:
you could always walk round dragging a chain behind you..... call me Igor.... :D
Now this could get silly! What about those anti-static things you put on your car..nail em to your feet?:D :D :D
 

lardy

Standard Member
gkinghrn said:
Now this could get silly! What about those anti-static things you put on your car..nail em to your feet?:D :D :D
:rotfl: perhaps wearing a copper bracelet smeared with snake oil would do the trick ??? :D or you could use the remote control ? :D
Seriously though. OP, don't earth the double insulated appliance as that's bad :eek: , nor should you take the earth off your other appliance, very bad..
...:eek: :rolleyes: :eek: ............................. :rolleyes: :rolleyes: noooo :devil: - "you're mine now......hahahaha..........."
 

AndyC_772

Active Member
gkinghrn said:
Now this could get silly! What about those anti-static things you put on your car..nail em to your feet?:D :D :D
You've obviously never entered the ESD protected area in an electronics assembly plant, then! Wrist straps, heel straps, anti-static floors and benches... you can even get conductive bin liners, I kid ye not.
 

lardy

Standard Member
AndyC_772 said:
You've obviously never entered the ESD protected area in an electronics assembly plant, then! Wrist straps, heel straps, anti-static floors and benches... you can even get conductive bin liners, I kid ye not.
do they take into acount chuffing a non-conducting gas from your bottom causing you to become charged up??:rotfl:
(that's analogous (hoho) to how some aerosol containers spontaneously ignite when leaking, trust me.)
 

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