Question Opinion on this router - TP-LINK AC1350

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by ocelot20, Aug 5, 2017.

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  1. ocelot20

    ocelot20
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    Hello,

    My ISP is Virgin and receive about 220mbps download and 13mbps upload. About 2 years ago I stopped using the crappy Virgin Superhub 2AC due to the poor wifi and online gaming being really bad even when connected via wire.

    I went with a cheap TP-Link Archer AC750. It has done us well with little to no issues. The only issue we had was the wifi signal for the 2 back upstairs bedrooms being poor. However, Lately both the 2.4ghz wifi and the 5ghz wifi have been acting up. One minute I could be using my tablet or phone in the same room as the router and lose connection. It seems to only be a wifi issue as devices such as my TV or PC or PS4 don't have any connection issues via wire.

    After resetting the router and upgrading the firmware. I still have wifi issues. It's not to bad but I would like to get it sorted. So am thinking of buying a new router. I prefer to keep with TP-Link if possible but am open to other brands in the same price range.

    So after reading some reviews I am thinking about going with this: Buy TP-Link AC1350 D-Band Archer and C60 C-Router at Argos.co.uk - Your Online Shop for Routers, Networking, Laptops and PCs, Technology.

    It is only £40 and seems decent enough. As you might be able to tell am not all that clued up on routers. All I want to know is does the AC1350 router have a better wifi signal than my current archer ac750 and is it better all round?

    Thanks.

    Again if you wish to leave some recommendations for other routers then by all means please do. I just want something that has a good wifi signal and takes advantage of the 200+mbps I get from Virgin. We have a few phones and tablets connected via wifi and a nintendo switch (most of the time at the same time) and 2x TV, 2x PC, 1x PS4 1x Xbox One connected via wire.
     
  2. mickevh

    mickevh
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    There are two issues to pick through - a coverage issue and a service loss issue.

    On the service loss issue, the symptoms you describe are the "classic" sign of an interference problem. This could be the neighbours, something in your locale and could potentially be a non-Wi-Fi source (Wi-Fi is not the only thing that uses the relevant radio frequencies.) A new router won't necessarily cure such problems. A better channel choice might solve the problem for free.

    A useful way to proceed would be to assess when you loose connection in both wavebands simultaneously or is it only affecting one or the other. Be methodical about assessing this - don't rely on "gut feelings" or other type of intuition. If only one waveband is affected, it's further evidence of an interference problem. If both, then you can be more confident something is up with your router.

    On coverage, Wi-Fi transmit power is limited by law and most kit is and always has been at or very close to the permitted maximums (it's about a 1/10th of a watt.) "They" can make a 1/10th watt Wi-Fi transmitter that fits in your phone, tablet, laptop, etc. Something that runs on mains electricity is not going to present a problem. There's no magic "uber router" with "much better transmit power" than everyone else's - they are all more or less the same.

    The best way to fix coverage issues (including best VFM) is to put up additional Wi-Fi Access Points to fill in the coverage holes, creating a "cellular" coverage pattern. The "trick" is in how you establish the "backhaul" connection between the outpost AP's and the rest of the network. The best way is with "proper" cabled ethernet, next best is (probably) using HomePlug/Powerline type technology, Wi-Fi backhaul is possible but it tend to clobber the throughput (speed.) Youcan buy combination AP/Homeplugs which some people find appealing. There's an FAQ on HomePlugs pinned in this forum.

    Ultimately, it's your dime if you want to buy a new router - just don't be disappointed if it makes no difference (it could even be worse than the incumbent.) A US based web site called SmallNetBuilder tests a fair amount of SOHO kit (quite methodically) and tabulates the results by various performance metrics. You could do worse that look there.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2017
  3. ocelot20

    ocelot20
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    Thank you for the very detailed response. I downloaded a program on my PC that let me know what the most clear channel was so have changed it on my router. So far no wifi drop outs today. You actually just reminded me I bought a micro router/extender a year or so ago for dirt cheap. I have a spare homeplug somewhere I can use with it to get better Wifi upstairs.

    Thanks again.
     
  4. mickevh

    mickevh
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    If you still have your SuperHub around and it offers better Wi-Fi facilities (protocol support, dual band, etc.) than your "extender," you might care to use the SH as the additional AP. There's a few hoops to jump through to do so described in the "Using Two Routers Together" FAQ pinned in this forum.

    Also, when deploying multiple hotspots, it is wise to ensure they are not using the same or similar radio channels as each other as the cells will almost certainly "overlap" geographically and one needs to engineer out any "inter-cell" interference for best performance. Use the same programme you did to scan the airwaves as you did before and try to pick the best channel in each locale.

    For small SOHO deployments, I advocate setting the channel plan manually rather than leaving them to auto-tune because SOHO kit does not "talk" to each other to try and negotiate a channel plan automatically.

    Even then, one can still get a problem if the neighbour's are auto-tuning, see your AP's then decide to switch to something new that then compromises one's carefully devised channel plan. We have to be a bit "zen" about than I'm afraid as there's nothing we can do about it unfortunately.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2017

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