• New Patreon Tier and Early Access Content available. If you would like to support AVForums, we now have a new Patreon Tier which gives you access to selected news, reviews and articles before they are available to the public. Read more.

Onkyo 626 pre outs to another amp

iybyisyl

Active Member
Hi.
Think ive been mistaken in my assumption.
Had wanted to connect the onkyo to my cyrus 1 amp and then play music through to 602 fronts.
Am i mistaken or is this possible via the sub preouts or zone 2 preouts?
Cheers
 
D

Deleted member 39241

Guest
It sort of is possible, but you would need a speaker switch.

The zone 2 pre-outs would not work for the front left and right speakers in 5.1 mode. They would only deliver stereo sound, which would be any surround sound downmixed. So that would be okay for stereo music listening, but for surround sound listening you would need to connect the speakers back to the AVR.
 

iybyisyl

Active Member
It sort of is possible, but you would need a speaker switch.

The zone 2 pre-outs would not work for the front left and right speakers in 5.1 mode. They would only deliver stereo sound, which would be any surround sound downmixed. So that would be okay for stereo music listening, but for surround sound listening you would need to connect the speakers back to the AVR.
Thanks for reply punctilio.
This isnt good news...i wanted an amp that i could integrate all the speakers.
What feature do i need then please?
 
D

Deleted member 39241

Guest
I
Thanks for reply punctilio.
This isnt good news...i wanted an amp that i could integrate all the speakers.
What feature do i need then please?
If you want to have an AVR and additional amp(s) permanently combined, you need the AVR to have pre-outs for the speakers that you want the other amps to power.

So, for your situation you just need the AVR to have front left and right channel pre-outs.

Having said that, if you are doing this to improve sound quality for music, you *may* find that routing the audio through the AVR and into the stereo amp, causes some degradation of sound. In which case the 'purist' route would be to keep the music and movies separate and if sharing speakers, a speaker switch.

But if you just want to add more power to your AVR for both music and movies, and you are happy with how music sounds when fed via the pre-outs of the AVR, then combining is the way to go.

I'd give it a try using the zone 2 pre-outs as a test, just to check that you are happy with how it sounds.
 

Mark.Yudkin

Distinguished Member
In addition to an AVR with pre-outs, you also need an integrated amp with a "home theatre mode" input - an input that bypasses the amp's preamp and volume control.
 
D

Deleted member 39241

Guest
In addition to an AVR with pre-outs, you also need an integrated amp with a "home theatre mode" input - an input that bypasses the amp's preamp and volume control.
Although that feature is useful, it is not absolutely necessary. The OP's Cyrus One amplifier, does indeed have Av Direct Mode.
 

Mark.Yudkin

Distinguished Member
Although that feature is useful, it is not absolutely necessary.
I beg to differ. If you are going to the expense of adding a stereo amplifier to your AV setup, you do not want to buy something that has been designed to cause a significant deterioration (yes!) of the AV sound quality. OTOH if you are buying a stereo amp purely for stereo usage, without no intention of connecting it to the AV's pre-outs, you would need to add a speaker-level source switch (such as the Beresford) to share the speakers. I understand that finances may dictate a compromise, but you should be aware of that fact before spending your money.

Finally, anybody considering adding a stereo amplifier for stereo usage needs to consider his speakers and their connectivity, since the stereo setup will not be accessing the subwoofer by default and limiting listening to small speakers on a stereo amplifier will also result in degradation.

In the OP's case, his amp has the feature, as you say.
 
D

Deleted member 39241

Guest
I beg to differ. If you are going to the expense of adding a stereo amplifier to your AV setup, you do not want to buy something that has been designed to cause a significant deterioration (yes!) of the AV sound quality.

I don't disagree with your points, but I am pointing out that they are choices rather than abolute facts. In order to connect an additional amp to an AVR with pre-outs, you don't need an integrated amp with a "home theatre mode" input, although that feature is nice to have, and *may* result in a better quality sound. And, indeed, if someone was going out shopping for an amp for that specific purpose, and had an adequate budget, then it would make sense to buy an amp with that feature.

However, if somone already has access to a cheap, or existing integrated amp without that mode, it could be configured to work via an AVR pre-outs, so there would still be value in trying it.

There is also the option of adding a dedicated power amp instead of an integrated amp, and some of these can be very inexpensive (eg the pro audio ones).
 

The latest video from AVForums

Guardians of the Galaxy Xmas Special, Strange World, Bones and All, and Cabinet of Dr Caligari in 4K
Subscribe to our YouTube channel
Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom