Ongoing: PlasmaDan's Living Room Cinema / Office Build

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by Plasma Dan, Nov 15, 2015.

  1. n3wtc

    n3wtc
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2006
    Messages:
    25
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +1
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2016
  2. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    Yeah I found both of those when doing my research. :smashin: I did get it working using Omxplayer & Screen. It actually worked really well, and you can set it up to automatically reconnect any downed streams (unlike VLC Player). :smashin:

    The only problem I had was in 1080p resolution the Pi 3 just doesn't seem to be able to handle it. 3 cameras will work fine, but once the 4th loads up, the screen goes blank and everything goes wrong. :censored: I got it working nicely in 720p resolution. I'm using all Hikvision cameras at 1080p.

    As for adding Kodi to it... well that's something I still need to figure-out. :rolleyes:

    Dan.
     
  3. peter-d-w

    peter-d-w
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2003
    Messages:
    790
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Skipton
    Ratings:
    +157
    Thanks for delivering the Pi3 LED lighting controller I bought from you today. First Class construction! It looks great. Well done!
     
  4. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    Update: Carpet Booked & More Problems.

    The carpet is finally going in next week, hurray! :clap:
    I decided to go for the slightly thinner 9mm Cloud 9: Cirrus underlay. I was planning to get the 11mm as people have recommended, but after measuring and working things out, I realised the carpet would be a little too close to the drop seals on the doors. I'd really rather avoid them scraping the carpet, so I thought it best to get the thinner underlay instead. :smashin:

    I asked the fitters to install the grippers the day before the carpet goes down, so the adhesive would have time to properly set before they install the carpet. You'd think they would do that anyway, but the last carpet we had was fitted in one day; and after 12 months we had waves forming everywhere because it hadn't been properly stretched-out. :thumbsdow Hopefully that won't happen this time. :censored:

    The carpet I've chosen is the "Boston 980: anthracite" (CarpetRight). Normally £17.99 m²; it was on offer at 50% off, so not bad really. I'm getting the same carpet throughout all of downstairs. :smashin:

    [​IMG]

    I had to choose a dark carpet since we have a log burner in the back room; which tends to create a lot of black dust when in use over the winter months. :censored:


    Problems

    Those with a keen memory may remember back on page 1; my mention of electrically isolating the gas & electricity meters at some point in the future. Last week my energy supplier came to install new smart meters. I've been trying to get them to come & change the meters before gluing the lid onto the cabinet. I finally got them out to do it, but... they refused the job. o_O

    The engineer took one look at it, made a cringe face, then went back outside to call his manager. His manager told him to abort the job immediately. After the engineer explained why he can't do the job and left, I was left in a difficult position; knowing the carpet is booked for next week, and the painting needs to be finished before that.

    I bought a copy of the latest on-site guide off Amazon (BS 7671:2008+A3:2015) so I could check for myself what the official word is on spacing of the meters. It states in section 2.3:
    Ok, so (b) is not a problem, all the cables are more than 25mm away already, but (a) is an issue. There is not enough space inside the cupboard to allow for 150mm of separation between the meters; period. However in section 2.3 there is a note which states:
    So basically if the gas meter is boxed out the separation distances don't apply.

    [​IMG]

    So last week I've been on the phone with my energy supplier again. I told them I would box out the gas meter to separate them, they told me "we can't advise that you do anything" and insisted I need to get the DNO to relocate the gas meter. o_O Yeah that's never going to happen, the DNO are notorious for being slow unless there's a real emergency. Even they told me that realistically, it would take 6 months for them to come out, but even if they did, there's nowhere the meter can be moved to that would be far enough away inside that cupboard. I eventually managed to convince them to come and put my new meters in, but only if I get a certificate for the house electrics first. o_O

    I'm not really sure why having a certificate has anything to do with the installation of the meters, but I guess we could do with having it anyway, since all the electrics have been re-done now. So that's being sorted next week.

    In the meantime I boxed out the gas meter with some 4mm acrylic so it conforms to the current regs.

    [​IMG]

    My energy supplier told me there would be no way to box out the gas meter in such a small space...

    [​IMG]

    ...Challenge accepted. :laugh:

    I bent the acrylic to fit between the meters using a heat gun. I glued mounting tabs top & bottom using some acrylic weld glue.

    [​IMG]

    I made another piece to go between the gas pipe & consumer unit.

    [​IMG]

    Finally I added a narrow door to fully enclose the pipes, but still allow access to the gas isolator valve. I used a couple brass hinges & miniature bolts I already had. :smashin:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I have a friend who recently had smart meters installed by the same energy supplier. The new electricity meter is a little wider than my existing one, so I tried to maximise the clearance to ensure it would fit. The acrylic cover can be removed easily using two screws, so the engineer can easily swap the meters and put the cover back in place, without breaking anything... hopefully. Maybe I'll just do that part (trust no-one). :censored:

    The gas meter & consumer unit are just over 150mm apart, so the meter itself can be exposed. :smashin:

    Now I can finally get on with the decorating, ready for the carpet. :thumbsup: My energy supplier will just have to struggle in the tight space won't they. :rolleyes:

    Stay tuned! :thumbsup:

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017
  5. peter-d-w

    peter-d-w
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2003
    Messages:
    790
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Skipton
    Ratings:
    +157
    Nice solution Dan. Well done!
     
  6. pompeydean

    pompeydean
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    790
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    46
    Location:
    Portsmouth
    Ratings:
    +235
    Good effort, fingers crossed they don't make any more excuses when they come back!
    Funny you talk about issues with the smart meters - I had mine booked for installation the day before my plasterers were due and they never turned up! Phoned the supplier (British Gas) and was told he should have been and they don't know why he didn't show. They don't have the ability to rebook me for over 2 weeks now as they're busy [emoji35]. They gave me a £30 credit, but I'd rather of had the meters in before the plasterers.
    Reckon the engineers are a bit work shy by the sounds of it!
    Looking forward to seeing your finished product! [emoji106]
     
  7. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    That happened to me also. These meters where originally booked to be installed on the 4th of July, I waited in all day for them... nothing. I rang them at around 3PM to find out why nobody had showed, they told me the job had been cancelled. What?! :eek: "we tried to ring you on Friday". I did have a missed call on Friday evening from an unusual number so I ignored it. Turns out they'd "overbooked" the job. The guy on the phone then told me the next available date was the 25th of July. :eek: I told them I need it done sooner, all I got was a chain of "Sorry, I can only give you the dates I have".

    ...Needless to say they refused to come any sooner, and I certainly never got any credit for the inconvenience. :mad: Also the letter they sent me said the 26th of July not the 25th, and I only got it 3 days before. :mad: They must just think we don't have anything better to do than sit and wait in the house all day.

    My supplier is Utilita Energy. We switched from British Gas back in May; still not got their meters.

    Dan.
     
  8. pompeydean

    pompeydean
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    790
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    46
    Location:
    Portsmouth
    Ratings:
    +235
    Ha ha, yeah exactly.
    Mine were scheduled between 1pm and 5pm - I phoned at 4pm to check and was told the department who issue the jobs would call me with an update within the next hour and a half - never got that call either!
    Useless
     
  9. D-an-W

    D-an-W
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Messages:
    1,795
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Ratings:
    +184
    That sounds like the "fun" I had trying to get our tumble dryer recall done which finished up with a £15 cheque and a brand new (Like for like) machine!

    Am I right in saying if out current meter is outside the smart meter will be installed in the same place as there is no way they are fitting it in the new kitchen :nono:
     
  10. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    The smart meters should be outside (if you have an outside meter box); as the engineer kept saying to me when he was here. o_O Obviously it doesn't apply to older houses, this house was built in circa 1890.

    Dan.
     
  11. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
  12. peter-d-w

    peter-d-w
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2003
    Messages:
    790
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Skipton
    Ratings:
    +157
    Perfect!
     
  13. scatterbug

    scatterbug
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2006
    Messages:
    2,083
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    116
    Location:
    South Wales
    Ratings:
    +698
    What caulk do you use? I've yet to find one that doesn't crack.
     
  14. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    Me neither. They key is avoid wetting it, since it's the moisture that makes it shrink as it dries. For larger gaps you often need to caulk 2 or more times regardless of the brand.

    The best caulk I've tried is this: Everbuild 125 One Hour Decorators Caulk Magnollia, mainly because the magnolia colour matches pretty-much all of my house. :rolleyes: Although the Supadec stuff is fine too.

    Dan.
     
  15. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    Update: Smart Meters, Overheating, Carpet

    I finally got my smart meters installed. :clap:

    [​IMG]

    The engineer showed up late (no surprise :censored:), but they did give me £30 credit as compensation so I'm not too bothered, I'm just glad to finally be done with this fiasco. :smashin:

    I got the cooling system reinstalled too, although I really need to look into buying a better fan; this one is just too noisy. I can slow it down with the speed controller, but then it doesn't get the air out fast enough. The only thing in the rack at the moment is the network switch, yet the internal temps are reaching over 30°C with the summer heat. :eek: I still need to install an AV receiver, my workstation, an HDMI matrix (eventually), plus whatever else. Clearly this fan is not good enough for the job, so that's another thing on my shopping list. :rolleyes:

    [​IMG]

    The summer heat has also killed off the RAID controller in my file server, so that's offline at the moment, leaving me with basically no local media. :( I may have to get 3 more new fans for the server too. Currently the server is cooled using 3x 120mm Noctua Industrial PWM fans, set to about 80% duty. These vent directly outside via 3 slate vents on the roof. I'm thinking of getting rid of the Noctua fans, and going with a temperature control system like the one in my rack-cabinet, using 3x 120mm in-line extractor fans. Hopefully then it can survive the next summer. :rolleyes:

    On a positive note, it's been a very productive week here. I finished off the painting, including the "Black Widow" paint for the screen wall. The bracket for the sound bar is mounted, all the switches & sockets back on, engraved switch plates arrived, monitor bracket installed, underlay arrived; ready for the carpet. :thumbsup:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The bracket is for a Monitor Audio SB3 sound bar; a passive LCR speaker for use with my AV receiver. I don't actually have the speaker yet, but it's on my shopping list. :D

    [​IMG]

    How nice would a curved ultrawide 3440 x 1440 monitor look here :D; also on my shopping list.

    [​IMG]

    These desk grommets where a tight fit, I had to use 2 blocks of wood with a bolt through to press them into place, but they certainly won't come lose. :smashin:

    [​IMG]

    All the data plates finally installed. :)

    [​IMG]

    The engraved switch plates look great. I managed to get both of these plates engraved and colour filled for less than £20. :smashin: I sent quote requests to a few engraving companies, one said they could only fill with black paint (which I think would look too much), most just wanted daft money, but mrsengravers.co.uk where able to do exactly what I wanted, and cheap. :thumbsup: So I can recommend them.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Clearing out ready for the carpet... :)

    [​IMG]

    Look ma, no pipes! :smashin:

    [​IMG]

    The back room has been decorated...

    [​IMG]

    I also took the opportunity to fix these old stairs; every step used to creak or thud when stepped on. I pinned all around each tread with my brad nailer to add strength, and ran a bead of polyurethane wood adhesive along all the joints. Sure enough... no more creaks. :smashin:

    [​IMG]

    Carpet done! :clap:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I'm very happy with the colour, I think it goes well with the bright walls. I forgot how nice a new carpet feels (and smells), I kinda want new carpet in every other room now. :D

    I still have plenty to do over the weekend. More photos on the way soon. ;)

    Stay Tuned! :thumbsup:

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2016
  16. pompeydean

    pompeydean
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    790
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    46
    Location:
    Portsmouth
    Ratings:
    +235
    Looking good mate [emoji106]
     
  17. ufo550

    ufo550
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,449
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Ratings:
    +798
    Hi Dan. Firstly let me congratulate you on your build and hard work, its looking good.

    I note from your earlier posts, you state you are an electrician, so am I. I often post in this category, trying to bring peoples attention I have concerns for, when they carry out their own electrical work. As you are an electrician, I feel a bit awkward making any criticism of your work, but these threads are often used as guidance, so feel obliged to challenge a couple of things. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

    Firstly, with regard the proximity of your gas meter and consumer unit. You refer to the IET on-site-guide (OSG) and given dimensions for the required spacings of said equipment. I know you'll understand the measurements come from BS 6891 (2015) as opposed BS 7671 (Wiring Regs), although BS7671 does have regs with regard to the proximity of services. You'll excuse me as I haven't either BS7671 or OSG to hand to refer to.

    You solution of the barrier and reference to the note in OSG 2.3, refers to the separation of gas pipes from electrical equipment, not gas meters from electrical equipment, I believe.

    BS 6891 (like BS7671) is not freely available to download. However, a quick internet search, can locate reference to sections of it, including this HSE pdf; http://www.hse.gov.uk/aboutus/meetings/hseboard/2013/250913/psepb1389-b.pdf, page 37 'Meters should only be installed in a location that ensures that necessary separation distances between the gas meter installation and electrical apparatus (as specified in the appropriate standards) are maintained'. I'm not qualified as a gas engineer, but I think this is why your gas supplier was reticent, for this reason, about installing your gas meter in its current location?
    Secondly, I would question the location of your CU complying with BS7671, in terms of for operation, inspection, testing, maintenance and repair.

    Not wishing to appear to be pulling holes in your work, but in the future others might follow your lead, which may be incorrect. Your thoughts?





     
  18. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    Not a problem. It is worth pointing out that my installation is unconventional due to space constraints, and I've had to leap over hurdles to do it this way. In all honestly I expected the engineer to say something when he first came to install the new meters, I just didn't expect him to refuse to do it. :censored:

    Yes this is made clear in the on-site guide:

    I already knew this was in the on-site guide based on my old copy, and I knew from the moment I moved the main incomer it was too close, but... I wanted a rack-cabinet. :laugh:

    That's technically correct. However I believe based on the information in-front of me, that the gas meter is included in this. The illustration in the on-site guide shows separation between the meter & consumer unit, not just the pipes.

    [​IMG]

    You'll notice that I enclosed all the gas installation pipework as required, but since the meter is over 150mm away, that didn't need to be (and a good thing since that would have made access difficult).

    I was obviously foolish to think they would turn a blind eye to the separation distances. They have to follow the law. In hindsight, I should have boxed out all the pipework before they came the first time.

    It's a tight fit yes, but needs must. The only other option would have been to relocate the consumer unit into the kitchen (at the back of the house); something I did consider, until I realised the cost and time involved in doing so, since the DNO would need to do that.

    I don't think it's a problem, the inspection & test was simple enough, and I have a clean EICR to go with the deeds.

    Don't worry about it, you are right; anyone reading this probably shouldn't follow my lead, unless they're willing to go through a lot of hassle. This is the way I had to do it in-order to have what I wanted, and at the end of the day I know the gas & electrics in the house are safe, they certainly weren't before. :censored:

    Dan.
     
  19. stevejames

    stevejames
    Novice Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2016
    Messages:
    7
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    4
    Location:
    London
    Ratings:
    +3
    Great update Dan, your build is really coming together now. Looking forward to this weekends update. Keep up the good work!
     
  20. ufo550

    ufo550
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,449
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Ratings:
    +798
    Thank you for your replies Dan, and honesty.
    IMO, after reading the OSG and researching BS 6891, the gas meter has to be located 150mm from any electrical apparatus, which includes the electrical service head. Think we'll draw a line under that.

    I note from your earlier posts, you do not own a multi function tester or similar?
    Your new electrical installation would need to be fully tested to comply with BS7671, which includes dead tests before energising and necessary live tests.

    I hope these tests have been carried out.

    For the uninformed, these are a requirement of BS761 to ensure the safety and correct functioning of the circuits, over current protective devices and additional protection provided by RCD's. You may wish to know these devices are not infallible, MK for example have carried out a product recall on some of their RCBO's.

    I also note that you repositioned your electrical service cable. Apart from potentially being unlawful, it's highly dangerous. These cables are sometimes decades old and delicate. They are often protected by fuses of hundreds of amps, and as you found out, sometimes the earthing facility provided by the DNO, is not suitable.

    An Electrical Installation Condition Report (EICR) would be carried out on an existing installation, and may not including testing on all circuits.
    An Electrical Installation Certificate (EIC) would issued for installation of new circuits and installation of switchgear or similar, a new Consumer Unit for example, which include testing of all circuits (as prescribed by BS7671) and schedule of test results and confirmation of compliance etc.

    I don't wish to deride you work, and some might seem my posting as interfering, but it is important that an electrical installation is correctly installed and tested. Not suggesting this is the case here.

    (edit spelling)
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2016
  21. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    I don't own a Megger, because I can't afford one. I own a decent multi-meter, I did the test procedure as best as I could with it before energising anything. I would never energise a circuit unless I was confident about the condition & integrity of the wiring & connections.

    All were tested after installation, and again last week during the inspection & test. :smashin:

    I know that, I took that risk, I don't advise that anyone else do the same.

    I have an EICR instead of an EIC because it was issued by another electrician, since I'm not registered with an Approved Contractor scheme (something I've been considering). He performed a complete test on every circuit. I would have preferred an EIC yes, but it would be illegal for another electrician to issue one for installation work they have not undertaken.

    Dan.
     
  22. ufo550

    ufo550
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2014
    Messages:
    1,449
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Oxfordshire
    Ratings:
    +798
    Thanks again Dan for your replies.

    The purpose of testing, is to ensure that cables have been installed correctly, connected correctly and not been damaged during installation. There are a series of tests, carried out in a specific order, which includes; dead tests of continuity of circuit protective conductors & bonding conductors (and specific tests for ring final circuits), insulation resistance tests, polarity (earth electrode test). Then after energising, earth fault loop impedance test, Prospective Fault Current (& external earth fault loop impedance) RCD test and functional test. There are others dependant on the installation. These tests cannot be carried out by a multi-meter, but by specific testers or a MFT.

    Dead tests need to be carried out, before the circuit is energised, hence why an EICR is not really appropriate for a new installation.

    As I stated, the equipment prior to the meter belongs to the DNO, even when in your property. You can be prosecuted for interfering with their equipment, and they can decline to connect an installation to their equipment, if they decide it's unsatisfactory.

    Third Party Certification is in dispute with the different government approved schemes. I'm registered with Elecsa, who for example disprove of third party certification, Stroma, another such scheme, however do. ON an EIC, it has to be signed for design, installation & inspection & testing. There is discussion on how the installation can be verified as it is installed, by the qualified supervisor. However, Stroma seemed to have overcome this and have procedures in place. It is therefore not 'illegal' (actually none of BS7671 regulations are statutory) for another electrician to sign off another's work, it would appear.

    I'm sorry to have hijacked your thread Dan, and it looks as if you have done some very good work. But this is just a salutary point to others, when considering carrying out work (electrical, gas or plumbing etc) for which they may not be competent, have the necessary equipment, skills or knowledge, (not suggesting you do not Dan), and I have read quite a few other threads, where they do not.

    Good luck with the rest of your refurbishment
     
  23. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    Update: Soffit Panels, Controller, Lighting

    Soffit panels are back up. :smashin:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Finally time to install the lights. :)

    [​IMG]

    The wiring for these lights is done using flex cable. This is to allow the cable to... well flex, when opening & closing the soffit panels. I decided to use cable tie mounts rather than pinning the cables, this should allow easier maintenance and adjustments in the future. The cable tie mounts are self-adhesive, but I thought best to screw them on just to be sure they stay in-place.

    [​IMG]

    I intentionally installed all the AC cables at the back of the soffit framing, to allow the front to be used for the low voltage DC cabling for the LED lighting.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The LED driver & controller are installed. I had to make a mounting bracket for the LED driver. I mounted it on spacers to allow it to ventilate a little better. I also replaced the internal fan with a quieter one, since the stock fan was WAY too loud. :censored:

    [​IMG]

    The grey 12-core cable supplies 230V power and all of the connections from the switches. The 4-core cable is for the motorised blind (which I still need to buy). :censored:

    [​IMG]

    All wired-up. :thumbsup:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    At this point, all the AC cables were connected & tested, so I could finally energise the lighting circuit for the front room & get some LED bulbs installed. :smashin:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    There is one slight design flaw with the controller. :eek: The input connections use a common 3.3V signal to trigger the corresponding GPIO port on the Raspberry Pi, this means the GPIO inputs are pulled down to ground using the Raspberry pi's internal circuitry (this is set-up via Python code). After sending the PCB design for printing, I had thought about potential problems with this. 3.3V is a very low signal to be sending down a long cable to the switch on the wall, and then back to the controller, I was worried about voltage drop being an issue, it wasn't. The Raspberry Pi was able to pick-up the much lower signal and operate just fine. However, when I switched on the spotlights... the blind motor relay was triggered. What the hell?!?! :eek:

    After some thought, it was obvious this was caused by the DC cabling being installed so close to the AC cabling for the switches. The Raspberry Pi is so sensitive it was picking up the EMI from the AC cables. :censored: I could spend some time desensitising the input to the Raspberry Pi, or even just include a de-bounce script to the python code to eliminate it, but it occurred to me... why not just switch to ground instead of sending 3.3V to the switches. I swapped the common input on the controller, to the supply ground terminal, and reprogrammed both the blind control & LED control scripts to use internal pull-up circuitry instead of pull-down, and... success. :thumbsup: No-more interference from the AC switches.

    This is a good example which proves not everything that works on breadboard works in the real world. Oh-well, lesson learned. :rolleyes:

    So, to those of you who are using my controller design, I have updated the GitHub page to include this change. The common 3.3V terminal is now redundant. The wiring guide has also been updated:

    [​IMG]

    I also got the PIR sensor for the alarm system installed. I spray painted the housing, but I obviously can't paint the middle part, so it will have to just stay white, unless I can find a small piece of dark IR transparent plastic. :suicide:

    [​IMG]

    Today I started installing the LEDs... but that's not finished yet so you'll have to wait. :D

    [​IMG]

    Stay Tuned! :thumbsup:

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2016
  24. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    Update: LED Lighting

    The LEDs I'm using require a LOT of current to run, especially when set to white, since that requires all three segments of each LED to be powered simultaneously.

    According to the documentation, The LEDs require ~15 Watts of power per meter. I'm installing approximately 12.5 meters of LEDs around my soffits, that's 187.5 Watts total theoretical load. However the LEDs operate at a very low voltage; 5V. So using Ohm's Law (P=IV) we can determine the load current: 187.5 / 5 = 37.5A of current! :eek:

    Standard 1.5mm² 2-core cable, surface mounted (installed to reference method C: clipped direct) can safely handle around 19.5A (AC or DC), as stated in the on-site guide (anything larger and we wouldn't be able to solder it to the LED strip). So 2 of those and we're laughing... right?

    :laugh: ...If only it was that easy. Since we're dealing with a mere 5 Volts, we need to consider voltage drop. If we tried just connecting power to each end of the strip, the LEDs in the middle would not reach the same brightness as the ones closer to the supply of power. We need to supply the power at various points around the soffits. The manufacturer recommends connecting power every 5 meters. I tested this, it did not seem enough to me, so I'm working to 3 meters instead; just to be on the safe side. :smashin: 12.5 / 3 = 4.17, so we need 5 lengths of 1.5mm² cable to the LED driver.

    That's ideal as we can just install one cable to each soffit section. So the first connection will be directly in the middle of the front soffit section, which is where the LED controller & LED driver are located.

    I used the same 1.5mm² cable for the data connections to the LEDs.

    [​IMG]

    I did a test with the LEDs facing outward, it didn't look right, so I mounted a quarter round moulding around the soffits to mount the LEDs facing directly upwards instead.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I used some short pieces of solid core cable to link the strips together in the corners. I had to solder them while in-place to ensure I got them in the correct position. This was tedious to say the least. :censored:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The cut-out for the projector creates a problem. The data signal needs to go around the entire length of the LED strip in one continuous loop. I had to install another cable to go from one side of the projector to the other.

    [​IMG]

    I installed the LEDs in left-to-right direction. This should make it easier to program the "ring of light" effect I've been looking forward to creating. :smashin:

    I tested each stage as I installed them to make any faults easier to diagnose. Out of a total of 755 LEDs installed, I had 2 fail. When one LED fails completely it stops the rest of the strip working. Fortunately it's a simple matter of chopping out the dead LED, and splicing in a new one. I have a few meters of LEDs left-over so I'll be keeping those safe. :rolleyes:

    Now the moment you've all been waiting for...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The LEDs are set to around 30% brightness in these photos, the camera can't capture the light correctly with them any brighter, but trust me they can go INSANELY bright. :D The LEDs completely wash-out the spotlights.

    I measured the wattage to the LED driver at various brightness levels. The highest is ~200W; that's at full brightness on white. Pure red / pure green / pure blue uses ~85W on full brightness, with a wide variation in wattage between different colour combinations. I measured an average 20W when set to around 8% brightness. So the power consumption is pretty good, they actually use less than the LED spotlights providing they're not set too bright. :smashin:

    [​IMG]

    Demo video...

    Home Cinema LED Lighting with APA102...


    This demo doesn't really do the LEDs justice, I have tested a few light sequences to see how it looks, but I need to spend some time on the web GUI before I can properly use those.

    I plan to upgrade the Raspberry Pi from the Model B+ to a RPi 3 first, I noticed when testing the controller that I built for peter-d-w that the Raspberry Pi 3 handles the colour fading better, since it needs to calculate & change each LED colour many dozens of times per second during the transition.

    I've also found another Project on GitHub which may unlock a lot more potential for these LEDs: GitHub - tinue/APA102_Pi: Pure Python library to drive APA102 LED stripes; Use with Raspberry Pi. I'll probably be integrating this library instead of Adafruit's, since it clearly operates much better on Raspberry Pi.

    So the room is pretty-much done now, time to start moving stuff in. :thumbsup:

    Stay Tuned! :thumbsup:

    Dan.
     
  25. N42

    N42
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2004
    Messages:
    916
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Ickenham
    Ratings:
    +70
    Amazing. Keep up the good work
     
  26. lovehathi

    lovehathi
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2015
    Messages:
    35
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    11
    Location:
    dublin
    Ratings:
    +3
    hi Dan
    Its an awesome job that you have done. Also the amount of knowledge is u have is like einstine

    just wondering will this lighting will be also controlled by media player and how are you planning to do. or its going to have separate remote?
     
  27. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    The lighting is controlled via switches on the wall, or using the web interface. I could easily add a USB IR sensor to the Pi to allow it to be controlled that way. :smashin:

    Dan.
     
  28. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    Update: AV Rack

    I got some equipment installed into the AV rack this week. :smashin: I'm using a short depth 400mm rail kit from here: www.servercase.co.uk

    These are the only ones I can seem to find that will (kind-of) fit into such a short depth rack-cabinet.

    [​IMG]

    They do fit, but as you can see, the back of the rails are a little longer. This is not a bad thing, as it means more reach when sliding the equipment out, but it does make installing them a pain. :censored:

    I finally got them positioned correctly after a lot of fiddling. :rolleyes:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I used the same rail kit for my server & HDD caddy (see here), so I knew I would have to drill & tap new holes into the workstation enclosure to make the rails fit. This actually makes things a little easier anyway, since I could install the rails into the rack first, get them level, then measure & transfer the position onto the workstation enclosure for drilling.

    I took the opportunity to clean-out all the accumulated dust in the workstation & AV receiver using compressed air. So everything in the rack is clean for now. I've yet to see how much dust will accumulate on the filter for the cabinet door. :censored:

    ...and voilà! :thumbsup:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I know the rails can hold a fair amount of weight since they're holding a caddy full of HDDs in the server rack, so I planned to just sit the AV receiver on top of the workstation. :smashin:

    [​IMG]

    Plenty of access to wiring etc. The rail kit also has quick-release clips if I need to remove the workstation at any point. :smashin:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I plan to eventually swap the 4U enclosure for a newer 3U to save a little space in the rack. All of my rack enclosures are from xcase.co.uk, I've yet to find anywhere cheaper / better for rackmount stuff. :smashin:

    My cooling system is working overtime to keep the temperatures down in the rack. :rolleyes: I need to get that thing swapped-out for a quieter one asap. I've been looking at this one: www.justfans.co.uk, should be a good direct replacement for my current fan. :smashin:

    Stay Tuned! :thumbsup:

    Dan.
     
  29. ahfh1

    ahfh1
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2005
    Messages:
    89
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Ilford
    Ratings:
    +4
    Excellent work!

    I was wondering if you could recommend which HIKVision CCTV to go for? There's a lot of them out there! I definitely want to go for POE!

     
  30. Plasma Dan

    Plasma Dan
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    653
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    96
    Location:
    Rhos-on-Sea, Colwyn Bay
    Ratings:
    +563
    Pretty-much all of the Hikvision range is PoE, so you can just pick the camera that best suits your needs / budget. :smashin:

    If the camera is to be positioned out of reach but exposed to the elements, I recommend a bullet style camera (like what I have). These work much better at night than the dome style due to the design. They also don't suffer from frosting as much during winter months.

    If you require audio, you'll need a dome style. Currently Hikvision don't offer a (budget) bullet camera with support for an external microphone. Hopefully they will soon. :censored:

    Some of the Hikvision range of IP cameras also have an internal SD card slot to allow recording without the use of an NVR. Although if you want multiple IP cameras an NVR would probably be a better option anyway. Although even if you do get an NVR the IP cameras internal storage could act as a backup.

    If you get the dome style and want to wall mount it, you may need a mounting bracket depending on where you want to point the camera, since they're designed to be ceiling mounted.

    eg...

    [​IMG]

    The cameras retail in the UK for ~£140 online, some eBay sellers etc will be cheaper. The cheapest option by far is to import them yourself. The last batch I ordered worked-out at ~£55 each from a seller on Aliexpress. You can end-up with a VAT invoice when bringing them into the UK, but more often than not it slips through the net (it's still cheaper even if you do pay VAT). :censored: Just be sure not to order more than 2 at a time since there is no customs duty to pay on items below £135.

    Delivery can take a couple of weeks, but if you're not in rush it's not a problem. :smashin:

    Also: don't update the firmware on the cameras, ever. They usually have latest anyway so there should be no need too, but if you do you'll more than likely end-up with a Chinese language web GUI. :laugh: This will also break compatibility with any English firmware Hikvision NVR.

    Dan.
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2016

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice