OLED BURN IN - THE MAIN CAUSE

JustTheFacts

Active Member
MANUFACTURING QUALITY ON 2017 AND OLDER OLED PANELS. SOME 2017 AND OLDER OLED PANELS DON'T DISSIPATE HEAT AS WELL AS OTHERS DUE TO A MANUFACTURING PROBLEM AND THERFORE ARE MORE PRONE TO BURN IN.

FROM RTINGS.COM BURN IN TESTS
Week 11 (04/10/2018): We contacted LG regarding the strange results in week 4. LG engineers visited our lab a few days ago and were able to confirm the 25% window on the Live CNN and FIFA 18 TVs are a result of a factory issue (see our video here). OLED TVs are produced in a hot process, and after cooling a 25% window is shown on each panel. Some TVs which haven't cooled completely can produce invalid results for the lookup table used by the 'Pixel Refresh' function, causing this 25% window to become visible. Only some 55" OLED TVs were affected during part of 2017.
As this is not an issue with the panel itself, it is possible to apply a fix to the lookup table. LG will apply this fix to anyone who presents this issue to their support, for free, even after the warranty period has long expired. They have fixed our two affected TVs (see the uniformity photos below). Note that this doesn't fix other uniformity issues as the result of static content, only the 25% window caused by a factory defect. LG has also confirmed that there is variation between panels, which is why some OLED appear more prone to developing uniformity issues (as in the case with our Live CNN (200 nits) vs Live CNN (Max).)
 

Michael7877

Active Member
Yeah, the 2017 and older panel issue mostly with red is well known.
You can assume a general 20-30% panel improvement regarding burn in and a doubling from software dimming (when target is static element to half its original brightness)

Panel wear is linear. The technology fundamentally hasn't changed since introduced, and the 6 C7 test proves it.

The cnn calibrated is 175 nits
The cnn maximum is 375 nits

Calibrated at week 100
Is maximum at week 50

375/175 is 2.14
100/50 is 2.00

2.14 is almost the same as 2 (so linear)

And the other tvs with different content to create burn in corroborate linear over time (what's visible at week 50 is roughly doubly visible at week 100)

This only goes for SDR levels. HDR is likely out of linear range, because if it wasn't, BFI would be implimented in a way that doesn't dim the picture. Picture on half the time (BFI) at double the brightness would keep the same picture level -- double 375 (max SDR) is 750 (HDR), so it's within the technical limits, but outside the realm of regular use without affecting panel lifetime adversely. Else it'd be done!
 

JustTheFacts

Active Member
Yeah, the 2017 and older panel issue mostly with red is well known.
You can assume a general 20-30% panel improvement regarding burn in and a doubling from software dimming (when target is static element to half its original brightness)

Panel wear is linear. The technology fundamentally hasn't changed since introduced, and the 6 C7 test proves it.

The cnn calibrated is 175 nits
The cnn maximum is 375 nits

Calibrated at week 100
Is maximum at week 50

375/175 is 2.14
100/50 is 2.00

2.14 is almost the same as 2 (so linear)

And the other tvs with different content to create burn in corroborate linear over time (what's visible at week 50 is roughly doubly visible at week 100)

This only goes for SDR levels. HDR is likely out of linear range, because if it wasn't, BFI would be implimented in a way that doesn't dim the picture. Picture on half the time (BFI) at double the brightness would keep the same picture level -- double 375 (max SDR) is 750 (HDR), so it's within the technical limits, but outside the realm of regular use without affecting panel lifetime adversely. Else it'd be done!
Sounds like you are pretty passionate about OLED Burn In. This is a list of the circular arguments.
OLED Burn In (Circular Arguments)
 

Michael7877

Active Member
And how do circular arguments apply to what I said?

Edit: read some, yeah. Most people don't know what's up when it comes to burn in lol
 

JustTheFacts

Active Member
And how do circular arguments apply to what I said?

Edit: read some, yeah. Most people don't know what's up when it comes to burn in lol
Thought you might find it interesting. If not then ignore. The same things get repeated over and over so I made a list of the points used in the discussions. If you see something that I missed point it out and I will add it to the post.

Anxiety, worries,and fear are a real problem today. OLED Burn In Activists can make TV watching an anxious encounter rather than a relaxing experience.
 
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Michael7877

Active Member
Thought you might find it interesting. If not then ignore. The same things get repeated over and over so I made a list of the points used in the discussions. If you see something that I missed point it out and I will add it to the post.

I used rtings test of 6 c7s to prove panel wear is linear. That means that TVs with the same use will have the same wear, and the rate at which wear happens is predictable.

Some people will get burn in, some won't. The ones that do will at some point have had bright static elements on their screens. The ones who don't will have watched varied content with no static elements. You can get burn in from watching the wrong content that's commonly on cable TV. It takes about a thousand hours of the wrong stuff, less in the worst scenarios.
You have to be careful with OLED as it's not as robust a technology as LCD, especially regarding displaying static content

Basically, you will not get burn in watching only films and Netflix, but be careful not to leave Netflix unattended too long, because after about 500 hours in the menu "Netflix" becomes a part of the bottom right corner of your TV in the form of burn in. 500 hours seems like a long time til you take into account the TV is supposed to last at least 10 years, sometimes you fall asleep, and the previews have Netflix over them too.

Time will reveal, I'm not worried personally. I have a warranty and provide instructions to people who ask how to extend their OLED's lifespan
 

Beachcomber31

Standard Member
I used rtings test of 6 c7s to prove panel wear is linear. That means that TVs with the same use will have the same wear, and the rate at which wear happens is predictable.

Some people will get burn in, some won't. The ones that do will at some point have had bright static elements on their screens. The ones who don't will have watched varied content with no static elements. You can get burn in from watching the wrong content that's commonly on cable TV. It takes about a thousand hours of the wrong stuff, less in the worst scenarios.
You have to be careful with OLED as it's not as robust a technology as LCD, especially regarding displaying static content

Basically, you will not get burn in watching only films and Netflix, but be careful not to leave Netflix unattended too long, because after about 500 hours in the menu "Netflix" becomes a part of the bottom right corner of your TV in the form of burn in. 500 hours seems like a long time til you take into account the TV is supposed to last at least 10 years, sometimes you fall asleep, and the previews have Netflix over them too.

Time will reveal, I'm not worried personally. I have a warranty and provide instructions to people who ask how to extend their OLED's lifespan
So if you need to watch one type of programme and not another on OLED in order to avoid burn in, the onus is on the seller to point that out. Of course they don't do that. They and the manufacturers will deny and exclude to protect their sales. If you read your warranty you will find that burn in is excluded and treated as misuse. I can assure you from experience that bad burn in takes no time at all on a recent LG OLED. Avoid.
 

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