OLED Burn In Risk

iwb100

Distinguished Member
The logo on the Jeremy Vine Show is blue and white in colour and is there throughout the show which lasts 2 hours per day 5 days per week .
I did think yesterday that I could watch it on my laptop every day but that's not a reason to buy a telly - thing is I'd be forever worrying which programme was going to be detrimental to my new screen .
I'm probably being silly but I can't help worrying after reading the horror stories in the OLED thread .
I'm not in a position to keep buying a new television every other year so whichever telly I buy needs to last a minimum of 6 years or more .

Blue and white is zero issue. Honestly not anything to stop you.

I've had an OLED for 2 and a half years now. I was worried about burn in. I game, kids watch channels with logos etc and no burn in at all.

The newer OLED's are more resistant to BI than my 2016 set. You will be absolutely fine.
 
Thank you , IWB and apologies for being an over-worrying old git , Dodge after all your hard work in reviewing these sets . Must feel like a thankless job at times .
 

Unopinionated

Active Member
It's a hot topic right now and you can understand why, so you have £1500+~ to spend on a new TV, there is a TV that hits all the boxes and its an OLED...but..

Oh my god no! Burn in is not covered by warranty, this means I am going to have a problem!!!

Contrary to how it may read sometimes both online in general and here at AVF, burn in is not a common problem with OLEDs, certainly no more of a common problem than it was in the Plasma days.
This forum and the internet in general is a place where people mostly come when they have a problem, there aren't many cases on the forum (or online for that matter) where there is an incentive for someone to tell us how fantastic their OLED is and how they haven't suffered from burn in. People naturally report when they have a problem, not when they don't!
The internet is a wealth of information that can make you believe any TV or any problem is a big one if you search long and hard enough. It's a little similar to when you open a newspaper to page 3, you know what you are getting.

Not only that, but OLEDs now are the TV to own, they are at their lowest in price they have ever been and they offer upgrades for most people in all areas compared to LCDs at a price where not only enthusiasts can afford them, but many regular Joes like you or I too.
In 2017 they have sold crazy well. Not only sold now by LG, but Panasonic, Sony and Philips too. LG themselves offer the most attractive prices and took a massive leap in the high end market share over Samsung in 2017.

So what do you get on the internet and here on AVF when a TV sells so much?

You are more likely to read an issue, simply because they sold more OLEDs to begin with!!
Believe me, if you moderated on the forums you would see. The OLED related threads (and arguments/disagreements) are two fold compared to any other type of TV. Most of the discussion and traffic here is directed in OLED owners threads!!

The same can be said about every good selling TV though. In 2017 many people reported problems with the Sony XE9005 and its frame repeat issue. Would this be such a hot topic if Sony didn't sell as many TVs? No.

In 2016 the best selling TV by far was the Samsung KS7000 and it was the same again that year, many problems reporting poor build quality, panel issues, motion stutter. If you sell a TV so well, you will see more problems online...it does not mean the TV is a bad buy, often it can seem that way but usually if a TV sells well, it does so for a reason.

It does not mean there is more likely to be a problem just because a TV sells more.

If you look at failure rates or conducted a survey of every OLED owner most people will tell you they haven't even noticed temporary image retention, let alone burn in!


So what do you need to ask yourself when it comes to burn in? What can help you decide whether you risk burn in or not?

Reasons you may suffer from burn in:

You have unusually invariable viewing patterns:
  • Do you like to leave the news channel on all day?
  • Do your children often watch cartoons and leave a cartoon channel on with a static logo in the corner for hours?
  • Do you often play the same video game that has a static hud in the corner for hours?
  • Do you like to use your television for productivity and spend hours looking at the windows taskbar?
You could tick all the boxes above and not be affected by burn in. Burn in isn't just about the length of which you show static/common images, but also how often and how regularly you do.

You have unusually invariable daily and weekly viewing patterns:
  • You are a one channel kind of guy, you hate change and like to have that news channel on for hours at a time every day for hours at a time for weeks.
  • Your children are addicted to the same cartoon channel and you've lost control over them, they relentlessly watch the cartoon channel with that static logo each day for hours, they refuse to go to bed.
  • You are that guy who likes long gaming sessions, but you don't just have the odd one, you like to game for hours at a time as soon as you get home at night until you drop. You never get fed up with a game and you like to play only one game at a time.
  • You intend to use the TV for content creation and as a PC monitor every day, you need to meet those deadlines each week and that requires a lot of time in front of your OLED to get that final project finished. You are a work addict and use your TV this way every day.
Reasons you will not suffer from burn in:
  • You don't meet both the viewing patterns and the daily and weekly viewing patterns above and just use the TV with variation like most people do. Even if you are a big gamer you have a variation in what you play and you use the TV for more than one task.
  • You are sensible and don't leave the same image on the TV for hours.
  • You don't turn off the screensaver feature of the TV.
  • You don't whack the OLED backlight on full and use VIVID picture mode and have your TV incorrectly calibrated.
  • When you pause your TV/Game or leave a static image the TV's screen-saver will appear after 2 minutes. You can also use a source screen size, eg windows/fire tv screensaver etc.
Here are some useful notes and Links:
What happens when you abuse your OLED TV.
What happens when you use your OLED TV for normal tasks.
OLED TV Reliability: Burn-In, & More | LG USA

Useful facts:
  • The risk of burn in with OLEDs is actually less than it was in the Plasma days. It's no more likely to happen now than then.
  • Its not only OLEDs that can suffer from burn in, abuse any type of display (even LCD) and you can get burn in. Just take a look at some of the old LCDs in pubs.
  • Youtube is full of people claiming to be experts and misleading people, do not believe everything you watch on Youtube. I don't want to name and shame but there are some really laughable content creators out there who literally will say anything to make a few extra views. Do not believe their rubbish! I am sure if you read this, you know the kind of channels I am talking about.

Hopefully this helps people make an informed decision and sorts out a lot of the scare mongering and misinformation out there about OLEDs. It should be pretty easy to tell for most people if they think burn in will be a problem or not, just ask yourself the right questions.

If there is anything I have missed or anything you think I should add, please let me know!

EDIT# 16th July 2019.

Its contained in the rtings.com real life test linked above but there is integral info provided by the rtings.com burn in test here:


If you use their method of calculation, you can effectively calculate from your own usage patten how soon it may be that you encounter any burn in on an OLED. In the example they use it would take 7 years of playing the same computer game with the same hud before you start to be at risk. Obviously this is not going to match many peoples usage as most people will not play the same game for 7 years, but it gives you an idea from being able to self-calculate how prone you may be to the risk.
Yeah sure, if my tone was a bit aggressive; i apologise for that.


I just can't help but disagree with the way of the descriptions were put forwards. I don't think you need to be "obsessed with deadlines" for an OLED panel to get IR/burn in by being used as a desktop in even 50% usage terms.

BTW I am someone who will buy an OLED panel the moment the current limitation is technology is overcome in regards to IR/Burn in. I'm not a hater of them at all, I just don't see why it should get a free pass on an obvious current limitation, much like LCDs on blooming/black levels/banding.

If LG and retailers covered persistent IR and burn in within warranties.. then it wouldn't be an issue, but its evidently one [which they are aware of and don't want want to deal with]. As consumers, as long as we keep giving companies byes/free passes on these issues, they will KEEP taking advantage. Other manufacturers who have be a lot more stringent with returns and keeping customers happy (such as phone manufacturers, alienware) seem to deal with the issue a lot better.




However once again, I apologise if my tone was rude. It was not the intention.
The 1.0 rating on rtings.com and their constant warnings of burn in can put overblown fear in viewers that vary their TV viewing habits like most people.
Most readers don’t realize that the 1.0 rating and their overblown concern with burn in is a marketing ploy for their website. Think of all the traffic that comes to their website because of this overblown concern. If only 1 in every 1000 OLED TVs experienced burn in they would still do everything they could to maximize the burn in debate. It is a marketing tool to draw attention to their site. The sad thing is it misleads those who don’t watch the same static image for 20 hours a day for many months.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Whether you agree with how they rate TVs for permanent burn in or not is a different matter but I don't think rtings.com are biased or making burn in any more of an issue at all. Quite the opposite in my opinion unlike some sources online.
Permanent burn in risk only accounts for 1.6% of their total score meaning LCDs without risk of permanent burn in only score 14.4 points more in total.
They have done two tests to demonstrate burn in and mention its not an issue for most people.

They also list OLEDs as their best buys, rating them very high.

So yes scoring a 1 versus a 10 is quite extreme, but it doesn't effect the overall rating and doesn't stop them from recommended OLEDs as best buys. If you read into the tests they have done, they don't create any untoward hype and tend to be pretty balanced, at least in my opinion.
 

Unopinionated

Active Member
Whether you agree with how they rate TVs for permanent burn in or not is a different matter but I don't think rtings.com are biased or making burn in any more of an issue at all. Quite the opposite in my opinion unlike some sources online.
Permanent burn in risk only accounts for 1.6% of their total score meaning LCDs without risk of permanent burn in only score 14.4 points more in total.
They have done two tests to demonstrate burn in and mention its not an issue for most people.

They also list OLEDs as their best buys, rating them very high.

So yes scoring a 1 versus a 10 is quite extreme, but it doesn't effect the overall rating and doesn't stop them from recommended OLEDs as best buys. If you read into the tests they have done, they don't create any untoward hype and tend to be pretty balanced, at least in my opinion.
Do you have any idea of how common burn in is on OLED TVs as a percentage value?
 

Unopinionated

Active Member
Whether you agree with how they rate TVs for permanent burn in or not is a different matter but I don't think rtings.com are biased or making burn in any more of an issue at all. Quite the opposite in my opinion unlike some sources online.
Permanent burn in risk only accounts for 1.6% of their total score meaning LCDs without risk of permanent burn in only score 14.4 points more in total.
They have done two tests to demonstrate burn in and mention its not an issue for most people.

They also list OLEDs as their best buys, rating them very high.

So yes scoring a 1 versus a 10 is quite extreme, but it doesn't effect the overall rating and doesn't stop them from recommended OLEDs as best buys. If you read into the tests they have done, they don't create any untoward hype and tend to be pretty balanced, at least in my opinion.
Pull up their review on the E9 for instance. Ratings.com says nothing about that burn in shouldn’t be a problem for the majority of consumers. They just warn that burn in is a real problem and give it a1.0 rating. Ratings.com is the reason OLED BURN IN is such an overblown issue.
 

zeppelino

Distinguished Member
Pull up their review on the E9 for instance. Ratings.com says nothing about that burn in shouldn’t be a problem for the majority of consumers. They just warn that burn in is a real problem and give it a1.0 rating. Ratings.com is the reason OLED BURN IN is such an overblown issue.

They say this right at the top - Unfortunately, just like all OLED TVs, it has the possibility of developing permanent burn-in that can be caused by cumulative prolonged exposure to static content.

It’s factually correct, and not overstating anything.

In the burn in section they also mention options to mitigate the risk.
 
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Unopinionated

Active Member
They say this right at the top - Unfortunately, just like all OLED TVs, it has the possibility of developing permanent burn-in that can be caused by cumulative prolonged exposure to static content.

It’s factually correct, and not overstating anything.

In the burn in section they also mention options to mitigate the risk.
They say what at the top? Unfortunately, just like all OLED TVs, it has the possibility of developing permanent burn-in that can be caused by cumulative prolonged exposure to static content.

They say nothing about this is a rare occurrence or that the majority of consumers will not be affected and then they rate at 1.0. This is misleading for the.majority of people that use ratings.com as a resource.
A rating of 1.0, isn’t technically correct or the truth.
 
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Dodgexander

Moderator
They are pretty open to feedback, so if something disgruntles you about their rating system you should pop them a comment in the review or email them.

It really bares no place to discuss their rating system here.

This thread is there to be an objective and given an independent and unbiased info regarding burn in and uses rtings.com tests an example. Thats all.
 

Craig805

Novice Member
I thought that it might be of interest to share my recent experience with BI on my new Panasonic TX-55FZ802B.
I'll be the first to admit that although I read several reviews before buying, and saw a friends picture which I was very impressed with, I was not aware of the potential BI issue (I guess that I didn't research deeply enough).
I love the picture - it's stunning.
But I found that after about 14 weeks of use, I could see a faint logo of some kind, usually only visible with a green or white back ground, so especially problematic while watching football, rugby or cricket! I quickly figured out that the ghost image was the logo of "Scala Radio", a radio station I often listen to for a few hours in the morning, via the Tune In app on my Roku box. The logo uses a bright yellow background.
I then started to research more about BI and AV Forums offered some excellent information. After spending £1399 on the TV only a few weeks before I felt rather upset that it wouldn't be covered under warranty.
I purchased the TV from John Lewis and called them to report the issue. As expected, they told me that BI was not covered under warranty due to it being "an issue of customer use". I informed them that I understood this but told them that a "few " hours of radio listenting over 14 weeks should not cause such a catastrophic BI issue - a year or two maybe, but 14 weeks?
To their credit, JL offered to call Panasonic while I held to get their take on it. After 5 minutes they told me that Panasonic asked JL to send their TV diagnostic/repair partner around to view the problem. The company is TVRS (www.tvrs-uk.com). Within 10 minutes they called me to set up an appointment. The technician came a few days later and ran through the screen test video on You Tube and the BI was there clear as daylight on several colours. I fully expected TVRS to dismiss my compaint out of hand as I assumed that JL and Panasonic would have primed him to do so. But much to my surprise, he was extremely sympathetic and took quite a few photos of the BI at various background colours. He said that he'd try his best with Panasonic and that in his experience, Panasonic were more customer focused on issues such as this than LG or Samsung.
I didn't hear anything for just over two weeks and so I sent an email to TVRS enquiring about the status. I didn't receive a reply for 5 days and then out of the blue, TVRS called me to arrange to come to my home to replace the OLED panel the next afternoon. Panasonic had approved the repair much to my surprise!
The panel swap out took less than a hour. They remove the back panel and the speaker infrastructure and circuit boards from the old panel and reinstall them on the new panel.
The technician showed me the paperwork and the new panel cost was £950 + VAT and that was the price from Panasonic withput TVRS labour costs factored in. I'm thrilled to have the TV back to it's original condition and can't recommend TVRS enough for going to bat for me. It's great that they come to your house and repair on site. I still listen to Scala Radio but not with the TV turned on!
If you have a similar issue, I'd recommend you pushing your retailer to contact the manufacturer to arrange for a techician to come to your home and look at the problem.

 
The onus was on John Lewis to fix or replace surely - I know Burn In isn't covered but it's just another name for a fault isn't it ? In a Court of Law then JL would be responsible .
Pleased you got a good result though .
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
Damn. These burn in stories always so scare me away from burn in.

Sadly fald manufacturers are now taking a really strange route of chasing viewing angles at the expense of image quality and black levels. I think with an extra hundred or so dimming zones and with the now used ultra wide filters we could get close to them being a bit safer than oled.

I think I’m still gonna end up getting an oled tho. I just wish companies and manufacturers would be more clear on the coverage of burn in rather than denying they cover it and then inconsistently on a case by case basis deciding if they are going to be nice or not.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
I thought that it might be of interest to share my recent experience with BI on my new Panasonic TX-55FZ802B.
I'll be the first to admit that although I read several reviews before buying, and saw a friends picture which I was very impressed with, I was not aware of the potential BI issue (I guess that I didn't research deeply enough).
I love the picture - it's stunning.
But I found that after about 14 weeks of use, I could see a faint logo of some kind, usually only visible with a green or white back ground, so especially problematic while watching football, rugby or cricket! I quickly figured out that the ghost image was the logo of "Scala Radio", a radio station I often listen to for a few hours in the morning, via the Tune In app on my Roku box. The logo uses a bright yellow background.
I then started to research more about BI and AV Forums offered some excellent information. After spending £1399 on the TV only a few weeks before I felt rather upset that it wouldn't be covered under warranty.
I purchased the TV from John Lewis and called them to report the issue. As expected, they told me that BI was not covered under warranty due to it being "an issue of customer use". I informed them that I understood this but told them that a "few " hours of radio listenting over 14 weeks should not cause such a catastrophic BI issue - a year or two maybe, but 14 weeks?
To their credit, JL offered to call Panasonic while I held to get their take on it. After 5 minutes they told me that Panasonic asked JL to send their TV diagnostic/repair partner around to view the problem. The company is TVRS (www.tvrs-uk.com). Within 10 minutes they called me to set up an appointment. The technician came a few days later and ran through the screen test video on You Tube and the BI was there clear as daylight on several colours. I fully expected TVRS to dismiss my compaint out of hand as I assumed that JL and Panasonic would have primed him to do so. But much to my surprise, he was extremely sympathetic and took quite a few photos of the BI at various background colours. He said that he'd try his best with Panasonic and that in his experience, Panasonic were more customer focused on issues such as this than LG or Samsung.
I didn't hear anything for just over two weeks and so I sent an email to TVRS enquiring about the status. I didn't receive a reply for 5 days and then out of the blue, TVRS called me to arrange to come to my home to replace the OLED panel the next afternoon. Panasonic had approved the repair much to my surprise!
The panel swap out took less than a hour. They remove the back panel and the speaker infrastructure and circuit boards from the old panel and reinstall them on the new panel.
The technician showed me the paperwork and the new panel cost was £950 + VAT and that was the price from Panasonic withput TVRS labour costs factored in. I'm thrilled to have the TV back to it's original condition and can't recommend TVRS enough for going to bat for me. It's great that they come to your house and repair on site. I still listen to Scala Radio but not with the TV turned on!
If you have a similar issue, I'd recommend you pushing your retailer to contact the manufacturer to arrange for a techician to come to your home and look at the problem.

Panasonic TVs have an option to turn the display off in the settings. This is what I used to avoid burn in when listening to radio on my Plasma.

But yes, having a static logo for some period of time on a regular basis will put you at risk, I hope that this thread helps people realise that is the case.
 
14 weeks of use though ??
These are the type of stories that put me off buying an OLED and wondering which Non-Oled would be best value at around £1300 [ or less ] .
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
14 weeks of use though ??
These are the type of stories that put me off buying an OLED and wondering which Non-Oled would be best value at around £1300 [ or less ] .
Its the cumulative time the static logo is there, this is an extreme case where someone had a bright yellow static logo shown on the TV when listening to the radio for a few hours each morning...it doesn't really have any significance when it comes to sport scoreboards or anything like that. The poster themselves admitted they didn't know this would put them at risk of burn in, so since you understand this kind of content puts you at risk, I assume you wouldn't follow a similar trend.

There are other factors about each persons usage that can put them more at risk too, one for example would be turning the TV off at the mains instead of standby and not letting it perform its refresh cycle.

There aren't really any LCDs that can match OLEDs for overall picture quality at that price point, the higher end ones rival them if you prefer striking HDR but won't be that much better than cheaper LCDs with everything else.
 
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I've read quite a bit on here and I've certainly read a lot of your recommendations and your ' Best Value TVs in 2018-19 ' , Dodge and I kinda knew you would say that [ and fully understand why you would say it ] . On top of that I understand it's mostly people with problems with their OLEDs that write in rather than those who have years of trouble free Oled telly .
I know [ from reading posts on here ] that it's red and yellow logos which contribute to Burn In on Oled tellies so I'll be watching what my family stick on the telly over the next few days - it's mostly just my wife and I , but our boy will sometimes use it - for instance tonight he's watching several episodes of Family Guy and it has the ' Fox ' logo in white in the top left hand corner . Is it ONLY red and yellow logos which affect Burn In or is there a sliding rule of colours which can contribute ? For instance while Red & Yellow logos are the worst , would White & Blue still contribute towards Burn In only they'd take longer ?
I'll watch a variety of television this week and report back the type of logo I come across .
Today I watched two games of football and while they were logo free you do get the abbreviated team names in the top left corner throughout the match e.g. ' Newc v Man Utd ' [ I think in white ] but lasts 3 hours every Sunday .
I do watch a few Netflix series now and again , I'll keep an eye out for logos and their colours .

Thanks as always .
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
I've read quite a bit on here and I've certainly read a lot of your recommendations and your ' Best Value TVs in 2018-19 ' , Dodge and I kinda knew you would say that [ and fully understand why you would say it ] . On top of that I understand it's mostly people with problems with their OLEDs that write in rather than those who have years of trouble free Oled telly .
I know [ from reading posts on here ] that it's red and yellow logos which contribute to Burn In on Oled tellies so I'll be watching what my family stick on the telly over the next few days - it's mostly just my wife and I , but our boy will sometimes use it - for instance tonight he's watching several episodes of Family Guy and it has the ' Fox ' logo in white in the top left hand corner . Is it ONLY red and yellow logos which affect Burn In or is there a sliding rule of colours which can contribute ? For instance while Red & Yellow logos are the worst , would White & Blue still contribute towards Burn In only they'd take longer ?
I'll watch a variety of television this week and report back the type of logo I come across .
Today I watched two games of football and while they were logo free you do get the abbreviated team names in the top left corner throughout the match e.g. ' Newc v Man Utd ' [ I think in white ] but lasts 3 hours every Sunday .
I do watch a few Netflix series now and again , I'll keep an eye out for logos and their colours .

Thanks as always .


Its just risk versus reward.

Sadly OLED does have a risk of burn in and will probably eventual burn in. You're paying for the stellar best picture quality you can get but sadly you're also paying for a device which by nature is going to age far worse than an LCD/LED.

I personally think its a small price to pay. In my house we have an LCD/LED edge lit and a Plasma. The Plasma is still flawless with motion and a beautiful experience to behold. The LCD/LED was given to my sister for her bedroom and I don't really care about it. Does the plasma have burn in/IR? Probably but I haven't bothered to check and won't.

OLED follows the same trends in that it has its clear negatives but its positives are a world class cinematic experience with pixel perfect blacks (which we're not near to having in any affordable display technology) and perfect HDR performance with an infinite contrast ratio.

The best advice is to just buy from somewhere which will cover the warranty. I spoke to TeamKnowHow at currys and they said they covered it so they might be worth a shout

My biggest issue with OLED's is the ridiculously expensive 77 inch model.

I upgraded from my Edge lit LCD after 4 years. I now want to upgrade my FALD after 2 years (will likely stretch it to 3). If you're buying a TV for longevity, an OLED probably isn't the safest bet.

Also with kids, I'd say its going to be hard to teach your kids not to watch static content or pause the TV. an LCD/LED might be better. The odds a kid will make that mistake over a couple of years is high.

I see an OLED as a big boys toy, for adult homes whom appreciate the stunning picture and make sensible compromises and workarounds in regards to its limitation (burn in/IR).

A FALD like the Q90R is always a healthy compromise.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Red was found to be worse, followed by yellow.

Still though, its not any different to the Plasma day's. Slowly they are making small improvements to make OLED tech more resilient.

I'm not a professional in the business, but there are plenty of people that are and they have no problems recommending TVs. I try to go into it with as much detail as I can to try and help people, but there are people who know what they are talking about out there that go as far as saying its a non-issue completely.

My take on it remains as balanced as it can be, its purely down to how you use the TV.

If its static logo's like score boards you are most worried about you should take a look at how over-imposing american sport can be with tickers, advertisements and static logos on the screen, then look at the test rtings.com did or even HDTVtest on YouTube and you'll see it will probably be beyond the use of the TV that you'll find a problem. Comparing american sports like the football test rtings.com did isn't even a fair comparison to sports in the UK where there are no tickers usually, no static adverts and no bottom 1/5 of the screen taken up with stats and scores. Not just that but if you buy LG you can auto dim logos to reduce the risk even further.

All you have to decide is whether you put yourself in the category of risk or not, for every horror story there are far more people who have no problems and given the last poster actually had his repair covered in warranty must suggest there was some kind of fault with the TV rather than them disallowing a repair purely based on burn in over time.
 

Unopinionated

Active Member
.
Vincent Teohs burn in test

In Vincent Teohs burn in test he took 4 static images and rotated them every four hours for twenty hours a day. After 6 months there was no sign of burn in. His analysis was that it is very unlikely that you will experience burn in on your OLED TV if it is a 2018 or later model.
 
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kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
Red was found to be worse, followed by yellow.

Still though, its not any different to the Plasma day's. Slowly they are making small improvements to make OLED tech more resilient.

I'm not a professional in the business, but there are plenty of people that are and they have no problems recommending TVs. I try to go into it with as much detail as I can to try and help people, but there are people who know what they are talking about out there that go as far as saying its a non-issue completely.

My take on it remains as balanced as it can be, its purely down to how you use the TV.

If its static logo's like score boards you are most worried about you should take a look at how over-imposing american sport can be with tickers, advertisements and static logos on the screen, then look at the test rtings.com did or even HDTVtest on YouTube and you'll see it will probably be beyond the use of the TV that you'll find a problem. Comparing american sports like the football test rtings.com did isn't even a fair comparison to sports in the UK where there are no tickers usually, no static adverts and no bottom 1/5 of the screen taken up with stats and scores. Not just that but if you buy LG you can auto dim logos to reduce the risk even further.

All you have to decide is whether you put yourself in the category of risk or not, for every horror story there are far more people who have no problems and given the last poster actually had his repair covered in warranty must suggest there was some kind of fault with the TV rather than them disallowing a repair purely based on burn in over time.

Its a non issue when its covered in the warranty.

I think a more healthy viewpoint is to just accept the risks, and buy an OLED rather than to try and convince yourself its never going to happen to you.

Understand what you're buying, work around its limitations and enjoy it.

If you can't be bothered to work around its limitations, then leave it.

I recently played BOTW. I then googled BOTW and OLED and sadly it showed someone with burn in of the hearts on Zelda (red hearts) on their set.
 

Dodgexander

Moderator
Well, I know I keep saying it but its no different to it was in the Plasma era, that didn't stop many people from buying those TVs and even back then there were people who didn't want to take the risk and went for an LCD instead.

It would have been the same story then as it is now, people reporting they had problems with burn in, followed by people who say they have abused the TV and find no burn in. I just think its blown a bit out of proportion and you don't hear anywhere near as many success stories about people without burn in just because you wouldn't hear about that to begin with.

Its not going to be covered in warranty because it never has been, permanent burn in has never ever been included in Plasma warranties either and even for LCDs that get burn in, its not covered by warranty unless its Samsung's marketing 10 year burn in warranty they recently introduced.
 

kenshingintoki

Distinguished Member
Well, I know I keep saying it but its no different to it was in the Plasma era, that didn't stop many people from buying those TVs and even back then there were people who didn't want to take the risk and went for an LCD instead.

It would have been the same story then as it is now, people reporting they had problems with burn in, followed by people who say they have abused the TV and find no burn in. I just think its blown a bit out of proportion and you don't hear anywhere near as many success stories about people without burn in just because you wouldn't hear about that to begin with.

Its not going to be covered in warranty because it never has been, permanent burn in has never ever been included in Plasma warranties either and even for LCDs that get burn in, its not covered by warranty unless its Samsung's marketing 10 year burn in warranty they recently introduced.


Sadly the fact remains that Samsung offer it and oleds don’t. Times have changed and they should now given how it’s not an issue according to yourself and experts.
 
:) Spoken like a good Lawyer , Aaron !
You have a point , if Burn In isn't an issue why not include it in the warranty ?
As for our previous poster who encountered BI after just 14 weeks of use with his Panasonic FZ802B [ which is on my shortlist ] who then had to plead with John Lewis to get in touch with Panasonic - to me after just 14 weeks of use that is a fault not Burn In and JL should have dealt with it immediately .
These are the problems we all face when trying to decide on our new TV .
 

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