Question OLED and 4:3 content

Discussion in 'OLED TVs Forum' started by Lesmond, Dec 5, 2018 at 6:26 PM.

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  1. Lesmond

    Lesmond
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    Hi all.

    Having recently purchased an OLED TV, should I be concerned about showing 4:3 content? I’m referring to the vertical black bars and the potential for image retention or screen burn issues.

    Logically as they are black, they shouldn’t be ‘on’ so shouldn’t have an adverse effect.

    Wondered if there is a setting to counter any negative effects of displaying 4:3 content for long periods. I have a Sony AF9.

    Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. GaryPL

    GaryPL
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    It is of concern if you watch a fair bit of it. The pixels above and below are on so will 'wear' faster.
     
  3. doug56hl

    doug56hl
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    There is the potential for differential wear between the off pixels in the bars and the main part of the screen same as with 2.35:1 movies. This can then show up after many hours as the off parts of the screen being brighter so on dim greyish scenes they don't go as dim and grey. Best not to watch a lot of 4:3 content back to back and mix it well with full screen stuff.

    I try to make sure I top and/or tail such content 50:50 with full screen stuff within the period before a compensation cycle runs i.e 1hr full screen, 2 hours 4:3 (or 2.35:1), 1 hour full screen then standby and run cycle. And then try to do at least 4 hours of full screen (and another cycle) before watching any more 4:3 or 2.35:1 content.

    With my LG E6 I also got dark horizontal line along the junction point of the bars and the rest of the screen through watching a lot of 2.35:1 movies which was visible on scenes with blue skies. I found running nothing but full screen for 30-40+ hours and strictly doing a cycle every 4 hours got rid of these lines eventually. They aren't now visible on content but are visible on 5% slides. I check every month or two to see if they are getting worse and if they are, put my Oled back on the full screen diet...:(

    Only way to nullify the risk is to, as Sony recommend, use zoom which is totally impractical for 4:3 content. Unfortunately players now don't have the option AFAIK to do a grey area for 4:3 or widescreen black bars like my DVD player did many years ago (or it might have been the CRT TV, been that long ago now I can't remember). At least that would guarantee more equal wear across the screen. Oled TVs should come with a similar feature if, like Sony, they say not to show stuff with black bars either above/below or left/right.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2018 at 7:25 PM
  4. Lesmond

    Lesmond
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    Thanks both for your replies - glad I asked. The Sony manual didn't go into a lot of detail so wondered what the reality was like from owners.
     
  5. addyeddy

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    The more I read about OLED's the more hilarity I find. The fact you have to be careful about what you watch and the amount show these TV's really aren't as good as they're cracked up to be. Even if the PQ is 10% better than the best LED/QLED, I know which I'd buy.
     
  6. GaryPL

    GaryPL
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    The issue isn't with the technology. You don't do the school run in a Ferrari and you don't take an Astra to the British Grand Prix. And in the same way you buy televisions according to your needs.

    But knowing whether something meets your needs is near impossible when companies like LG flatly refuse to define what acceptable use is and then completely refuse to fix issues when they arise.

    This is, in my opinion, wholly unacceptable practice, particularly because it involves flagship end devices costing £2k or more. The hoops I had to jump through for a known problem were extensive and unnecessary. So I can only imagine the pain others have to endure.
     
  7. addyeddy

    addyeddy
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    The issue is 100% to do with the technology!
     
  8. GaryPL

    GaryPL
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    It really isn't. All technology has its tolerances and limits. They just have to be respected. Except LG won't state what the limits are.

    I suspect LG won't ever do so as it'll mean having to be up front about the technology not being right for a fair few people.

    A technology not being right for someone doesn't make the technology at fault.
     
  9. johnpmc35

    johnpmc35
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    I have to agree with @eddyeddy. I'm an OLED owner that has suffered with 'burn out' from watching NFL once a week, from using the internal Netflix app and from changing channel on my sky hd box. You also read that people have it from watching the news, sports news, breakfast television shows, playing certain games (Overwatch for example). Then you also read that watching too many 2.35:1 movies (same rule applies for 4:3 content) can also lead to problems, so what are you actually supposed to use this tv for?
     
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  10. doug56hl

    doug56hl
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    The LG fireworks screensaver is quite nice...:)
    As are the various Oled HDR demos from LG, Sony and Panasonic.
    It's a bit more than 10% especially for the fireworks screensaver...;)
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2018 at 6:05 PM

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