Oled 1080p or 4K LED?

Discussion in 'General TV Discussions Forum' started by Dextur, Jan 30, 2014.

  1. Dextur

    Dextur
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    I'm in limbo with some cash burning a hole in my pocket.

    Looks like 4K OLED is years off at 60"+ sizes for £5k ish.

    So question becomes, hang on a bit for a 60" OLED 1080p or grab a Samsung or LG 4K LCD?

    Is OLED 1080p superior to a 4k LCD?
     
  2. Tonkerdog

    Tonkerdog
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    Until there is an agreement as to what format UHD will in, I'd just wait and see. There is even talk of including a chip in BluRay discs like Apple does in its cables, to ensure it has be a legit.

    None of the current TVs will have that hardware/software for these chips thus making them nothing but great but obsolete up scalers. Trust me I can't wait for this to technology to come about in the mainstream, but I don't think it's any where near that, regardless of all the UHD TVs that are being banged out.

    A 1080p LG OLED on the other hand should give you 5 years grace until second generation mature UHD panels arrive, whatever their make up.
     
  3. Dextur

    Dextur
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    When you say what format UHD will be in , what do you mean?

    I don't want blue ray disks.

    I'm fine with 1080 OLED if it can outpeform native 4k performance even on a LCD.

    Hard to see if that's the case.
     
  4. Tonkerdog

    Tonkerdog
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    You will have to think what format UHD is comng in, nobody knows how they will receive it yet. When I said BluRay I meant it as a future generisation.
     
  5. Dextur

    Dextur
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    Still a bit lost when you say "format", what kind of formats?

    In terms of recieving it, Netflix are releasing 4k content this year.
     
  6. Tonkerdog

    Tonkerdog
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    This is a review of what I believe is to be a very good UHD TV, and it covers some of the format/content issues......

    The only thing certain about the next evolution in broadcast technology is its uncertainty. 4K/Ultra HD may be widely accepted as the next step from 1080p Full HD, but even broadcasters have yet to agree a specification. While BSkyB looks certain to go with 2160p at 50/60Hz for its sports coverage, the BBC is rumoured to want native frame rates to top 100Hz. For brands eager to punt 4K screens this is all rather inconvenient, not least because TVs prior to this Panasonic model are tethered to 4K at 30Hz, thanks to the limitations of current HDMI chippery.

    Contrary to popular belief, the future of TV isn't just about spatial resolution, it's about temporal resolution as well. While there's no doubt that an image four times as detailed as Full HD is impressive, broadcasters seem convinced that most consumers will struggle to appreciate the benefit unless they buy a really big screen. However, research indicates that we all immediately appreciate high frame rates: sixty 8m-pixel frames a second, which is supported by HDMI 2.0, equates to a massive 480 megapixels a second of visual information. 30 frames a second taps out at 240mp, which is a lot less detail. Small wonder then that the arrival of the world’s first HDMI 2.0 compliant screen, complete with full 18Gbps bandwidth, is potentially a game-changer.

    Designer UHD
    The TX-L65WT600 reflects Panasonic’s 2013 design ethos, with a slim chrome bezel and distinctive illuminated plastic trim across the bottom edge of the screen. Its slick appearance is only broken by the HD cam positioned on top. A cable tidy umbilical tube is supplied.

    Connectivity includes four HDMIs (only one of which is HDMI 2.0-enabled), Scart and component/
    composite inputs via adaptors, a trio of USBs (one designated for external hard drive recording), Ethernet, SD card reader and an optical digital output. Wi-Fi is integrated. This is also the first consumer telly to offer a DisplayPort input; a connection standard more commonly associated with Apple laptops and PC graphics cards. As it happens, its inclusion here is something of a masterstroke.

    Naturally the WT600 features Panasonic’s internet-connected feature roster, fronted by the customisable My Home Screen user interface. Currently enjoying a slight upgrade with the addition of themed Pages, most notably from YouTube and Eurosport, this remains a uniquely intuitive UI.

    While the meagre selection of catchup services in the Viera marketplace isn't a deal breaker, it remains disappointing. On the plus side, the brand has introduced its own 4K streaming service, allowing 50/60Hz clips to be viewed – provided your broadband connection is fast enough. A connection of around 50Mb/s is advised, so if you don’t have fibre you might as well forget it.

    Media playback from USB is excellent, with the set playing back most key file types, including MKV video and FLAC. Across a network, compatibility is a tad more restrictive. I couldn't play any MKVs from my NAS. The WT600 also supports a UHD-enhanced version of Panasonic’s Swipe & Share DLNA technology. Mobile users can also mirror their device utilising Screen Mirroring, an implementation of Miracast.
     
  7. Scooby2000

    Scooby2000
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    Id not go 4k yet for reasons posted.
    These sets are also LED so will have the same problems.
    If I had the cash I'd be going VT65 or OLED and then upgrading in 4-5 years to 4k OLED when the manufacturers produce a 4k set worth buying.
     
  8. rogdodge

    rogdodge
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    I am coming from the angle that I do not need 4K/UHD. There are no TV channels in 4K. ;) If I put my OLED preference to one side and end up buying an UHD TV it will be because:

    1. I hope the PQ will be better as I understand there are more pixels in a UHD screen that 1080p.
    2. They will most likely be flagship models with faster refresh rates etc.
    3. There seems to be a lean towards UHD TVs with FALD.

    Just my pennies worth. :)
     
  9. Scooby2000

    Scooby2000
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    Without the content your left with an up scaling LCD... if you like LCD you'll be happy, otherwise Id go OLED and upgrade to 4k in a few years when content is available to you.
     

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