Old AV receiver with new TV

TommyBoyWA

Novice Member
I have a Yamaha RX-V777 receiver, and I'm getting a new LG C1 OLED tv on Friday.
I'm planning on hooking all 4k stuff directly into the C1 tv, and then running audio to the Yamaha over HDMI. Should I expect any HDCP issues with audio being passed to the receiver? I upgraded all my HDMI cables to 2.1 recently. I'd hate to get the tv Friday and have the boss giving me an earful. Do I lose anything quality wise with this setup? Thanks!!!
 

Mark.Yudkin

Distinguished Member
Your Yamaha RX-V777 supports ARC so you'll get audio from the TV to the AVR. Since the AVR only supports ARC and not eARC, the sound quality "standard definition" - that of DVD.

If any of your 4K sources have dual independent HDMI outputs, you can run the 4K output to the TV and the "audio" output to the AVR.

The boss will likely give you an earful anyway :) .
 

gibbsy

Moderator
The older ARC connection will be in play and this can be troublesome so an optical connection may be far more stable. You'll get the same SD resolution for the audio as HDMI ARC with the exception of DD+ and Atmos. If you've not got an Atmos speaker set up then I would certainly use optical over HDMI ARC.
 

ShanePJ

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
Optical would be the simplest way, just be aware that you'll need to check the ability of the TV with its processing systems if you are plumbing everything into the TV. Some TV's just downsample to stereo via optical and as others have mentioned, you'll most likely end up pulling your hair out with ARC as its not perfect especially from that era with many teething issues which have never gone away

For stability, If any of your devices have a digital optical output (and your TV does downsample), I would uses this over the TV's own Optical

As for something like a Blu-ray player (if you still have to purchase one), you would be better ensuring you look for one with twin HDMI outputs enabling you to use the main out for 4K (to the TV) and the secondary output for audio into your Yamaha allowing you to have full surround sound as found on the disc
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
HDCP isn't applicable to audio and only effect video encoded with such protection.

The issue you are going to have with passing audio through the TV is the lack of eARC on the AV receiver. eARC is better than conventional ARC because it allows for HD formats such as TrueHD or DTS-HD MA and also can convey multichannel PCM. Your AV receiver predates eARC and is only equipped with ARC which is limited to 5.1 SD formats such as Dolby Digital or DTS and just 2 channel PCM. Optical will also be limited to nothing more than 5.1 SD formats or 2 channel PCM.

As suggested, you'd ideally want s direct HDMI connection from source to the AV receiver to convey HD formatted audio. Some devices such as 4K UHD disc players include both a video and an audio HDMI output that would allow you to send video directly to the TV via one output while simultaneously sending audio directly to the AV receiver via the other output, but other sources are unlikely to have such an arrangement.
 

TommyBoyWA

Novice Member
Thanks everyone, I sincerely appreciate the help. I'm thinking the best approach will be for me to get a new AV receiver. It's crazy how quickly standards change and equipment gets outdated, but I guess ~6 years is a pretty good run for electronics.
 

ShanePJ

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
What other electronics are you looking to connect? Is it a console like a PS5 or items which are not as hungry on the HDMI bandwidth?

This could be important to you if your a gamer as not all AV Receivers allow the full fat HDMI bandwidth. If it's the likes of Sky/Virgin with streaming features from the TV, then this will not be as import
 

TommyBoyWA

Novice Member
What other electronics are you looking to connect? Is it a console like a PS5 or items which are not as hungry on the HDMI bandwidth?

This could be important to you if your a gamer as not all AV Receivers allow the full fat HDMI bandwidth. If it's the likes of Sky/Virgin with streaming features from the TV, then this will not be as import
Presently using - cable tv box, OTA receiver, my son has a PS5, Amazon Firestick.
 

ShanePJ

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
The only one you’ve got to be aware of is the PS5 which I’m sure is just adding some of the features which could spring up some surprises as they haven’t been active before. Just check the small print of the AV Reciever you look at to ensure it has the features and also think about the bandwidth for this product as you really want full fat HDMI for gaming as some of the modern gaming software looks amazing. Just check out unreal engine 5 to see what it’s capable of. Some of the game play is like watching a film. It looks fantastic
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
As long as the AV receiver you get is eARC enabled then you needn't worry about the console. All you need do is connect said console directly to the 4K 120Hz compliant display and then pass the audio through that display and out to the AV receiver via eARC. The AV receiver itself dioesn't need to be 4K 120Hz or 8K compliant as long as it is eARC enabled. The bandwidth of the HDMI chipset utilised wouldn't effect this.

Note that playing games at 120Hz means that the graphics have to be compromised to fascilitate this. You'd not get both ray tracing and 4K 120Hz game play via a PS5 for example. You have to turn off 120Hz in otfer to get ray tracing or turn off ray tracing to get 120Hz.
 
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TommyBoyWA

Novice Member
As long as the AV receiver you get is eARC enabled then you needn't worry about the console. All you need do is connect said console directly to the 4K 120Hz compliant display and then pass the audio through that display and out to the AV receiver via eARC. The AV receiver itself dioesn't need to be 4K 120Hz or 8K compliant as long as it is eARC enabled. The bandwidth of the HDMI chipset utilised wouldn't effect this.

Note that playing games at 120Hz means that the graphics have to be compromised to fascilitate this. You'd not get both ray tracing and 4K 120Hz game play via a PS5 for example. You have to turn off 120Hz in otfer to get ray tracing or turn off ray tracing to get 120Hz.
Thanks for that! Assuming I get a new AVR, I could go from the PS5 > new AVR (tbd) > new TV (LG C1) without losing anything for gaming and bluray viewing?
Considering Onkyo TX-NR6050, Yamaha TSR-700, Denon AVR S760H.... but I'm open to recommendations in the same price range :)
 

Mark.Yudkin

Distinguished Member
The thing about a PS5 for gaming is that you want to reduce latency, hence it's better to run the PS5 directly to the TV, and set "games mode" on the corresponding HDMI port (LG C1: see under "game optimizer" in the manual).

Of the sources you have, only the PS5 actually does HD audio. I'm not sure it's really worth the cost of a new AVR just to support higher definition audio during game play, when your attention is anyway occupied elsewhere. You may well be better off just using what you have via ARC. If ARC doesn't work, as some of the posts here are suggesting, then you may need to revisit the question of a new AVR.

Another consideration is that spending money on a new AVR so that you can play games on your son's PS5 with high resolution audio might just get you the earful from your boss that you wanted to avoid. :(
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
The issue isn't HD audio when playing games and is the fact that games consoles use multichannel PCM relative to their output while playing games. They do this brcause it allows the console to mix in audio that the console creates. You cannot convey multichannel PCM via optical or conventional ARC and would need to use a direct HDMI connection or eARC in order to be able to convey multichannel PCM.

You can however force the PS5 to output games audio as 5.1 DTS or Dolby Digital though.
 

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