OK - what am I doing wrong?

Clem_Dye

Distinguished Member
Yesterday I went for a visit to the Mount Grace Priory (just north of Northallerton, in North Yorkshire). Armed with my Canon 400D + kit lens I took a selection of pictures - I'm still getting used to the camera so I'm trying to suppress the urge to buy another lens (with difficulty!). Anyway, I'm generally happy with the shots I took (making allowances for the newbie factor) but having transferred the pictures to my PC I'm pretty disappointed with the pictures of the daffodils that I took - the yellows look very muted and/or dull, and certainly not how I remember them. The pictures themselves seem fine - skies are nice and blue and so forth, it's just the yellows that seem off in those pictures where I've got close to a flower - at a good distance they seem, well, yellow! The day was pretty bright so it's not that. I compared these shots to some others (again daffodils) that I took in Harrogate a couple of weeks ago and yet again I see the same muted yellow tones on close-up shots.

Anyone got any suggestions? The only thing that I can think of is that perhaps I need to adjust the camera's white balance, which I haven't touched. I'd be happy to post a picture or two if that helps. Is this one of those situations where I need to adjust the picture via software? I'd like to think not in this circumstance but this is my first DSLR .....

TIA


Clem
 

senu

Distinguished Member
You will need to post the pictures

The 400D is a very capable camera with good glass in the right hands ( ..yours eventually:D)

However
It is sometimes the case that Auto and default camera settings are not doing your efforts any favours
If you shoot RAW it is possible to change the picture style and white balance afterwards
Auto white balance should be fine outdoors. It is usually less accurate with artificial lighting
Learning the camera involves initially taking a lot of duff shots until you get how to get it to reproduce what your eye sees.
This involves taking the same shot with different settings ( Use P and vary shutter aperture combinations, ISO, and avoid the lens extremes if you can ) and learn from the Info/ histogram right after taking the shot
If you are stuck, most pictures can be improved with different levels of PP
and
Ultimately
You will need better lenses;)
 

Clem_Dye

Distinguished Member
OK - I didn't want to just go ahead and post the pictures - I wasn't sure of the forum netiquette. In any event the images vary from ~2MB to 5MB in size - too big for me to upload at present. I'll have to try and sort out some web space somewhere and post some url details.

Interestingly, the pictures look slightly better using the Windows in-built picture viewer than they do the Canon Image Browser software. Is that the issue, perhaps?

TIA


Clem
 

senu

Distinguished Member
You can post small 800 pixel (max 120Kb sized ) as attachments if you wish or use the likes of flikr.. when you can.
Even with embedded images there is still an 800 pixel max length 200KB limit although you can certainly link any size you like
 

Tobers

Well-known Member
As said above, use RAW, and you'll find that you can make quite major alterations using the RAW image processing software that came with the camera. Right click on the pic with the "R" on it in Zoombrowser, choose "Process RAW Images" and off you go.

Could also be that the pics were overexposed a tad. Daffs usually come out nice & yellow (see previous "show us your daffodils" thread).

Lets see some pics and we'll figure it out. Most people use Flickr or Smugmug to store pics online, and then just link to them. Easy as pie.
 

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