NTSC to PAL

Discussion in 'General TV Discussions Forum' started by fordy361, Dec 14, 2001.

  1. fordy361

    fordy361
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    IS THERE ANYWAY U CAN CONVERT NTSC SIGNALS SO THAT
    YOU CAN WATCH REGION 1 DVD'S ON A PAL ONLY TV
     
  2. Stuart Wright

    Stuart Wright
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    As I recall I think the options are all expensive. Anyhow, please don't post in all UPPER CASE and please don't post multiple copies of the same question in different forums.
     
  3. Doubledoom

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    NO NEED TO SHOUT :rolleyes:

    Unusual to have a tv that is PAL only. Unless it is fairly old or a budget model.

    If you get black and white pictures whilst viewing a R1 title, then you can get round it by connecting up via scart and selecting RGB as the video signal.

    If you don't have a scart socket or you can't do RGB then you are looking at a standards convertor. Although it may be more economical to get a new television.
     
  4. LV426

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    Your options depend on, as Doubledoom said, dependent on your TV.

    If you play an NTSC (eg R1) DVD and get a stable picture, but in Black & White, then it's easy. Either use RGB, or, if you need to continue using Composite or S-Video, find the switch (maybe a physical one, or one in the setup software) on your DVD player labelled something like NTSC/AUTO/PAL, and set it to PAL. Note that this produces a hybrid picture signal, not truly PAL, so it only works if your TV shows you the B&W picture properly as above. If, after you've changed this setting, it's still B&W, RGB may be the only choice.

    If, when you play an NTSC DVD, you get an unstable, rolling or otherwise unusable picture, then it's more difficult (read, expensive).

    Your options then are:

    1) A new TV which will cope with NTSC or the hybrid PAL signal OR
    2) A new DVD player which will produce a fully-PAL signal from an NTSC disc. Some Samsung and LG models have this ability - referred to in some ads as PAL50 (not PAL60). OR
    3) A TV standards converter. These cost from £300-£800 from lektropacks.
     
  5. John R Baker

    John R Baker
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  6. Grubert

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    I think LG players can convert NTSC to pure PAL (ie, 50Hz). That would solve your problem.

    Or, get a new TV with all the bells and whistles.
     
  7. Rosco

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    I used an NTSC to PAL converter from Keene on my old Sony, Make me a reasonable offer and its yours.

    Ross

    [email protected]
     
  8. Lowrider

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    Many DVD players convert NTSC to PAL, not the contrary...
     
  9. LV426

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    Not true.

    Many DVD players have a PAL option, which, when selected, produces a picture signal in which the colour carrier is according to the PAL standard, but the line and frame rate are kept at the NTSC standard which is 525 lines, 60hz. This "bastard" signal is also known as pseudo-pal or transcoded NTSC. The only place in the world where PAL/525/60 is the de facto TV standard is, Brazil, I think.

    Only very few DVD players have the ability to take an NTSC/525/60 (eg R1) disc and output a fully converted PAL/625/50 (ie 625 lines, 50hz) signal.
     

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