Not enough bass/warmth in room

hamlynrudd

Novice Member
Hello to everybody.

I have had a good look around the web and I can't seem to find a solution to my issue.

I have moved my hifi into the garage, which has been great. However, when in my seating position, the sound is lacking some warmth and bass. When I stand up there is significantly more bass, possibly a little boomy if anything. I believe this is a common complaint.

So what I'm asking is, is there a way to prevent losing the bass from my seating position to the top of the room?

Thank you very much for any help.
 

karlsushi

Active Member
Low frequencies have longer wavelengths, up to several metres for very low frequencies. This means that you get much more variety in terms of what you actually hear, depending on your position relative to the sound source (in this case your speakers).

Wall/ceiling reflections only add to the problem as the peaks and troughs of the wave bounce around and hit your ears out of time and can cancel each other out.

There are several ways to try and address the problem, but the simplest is simply by speaker placement and positioning. The problem here though is that you may solve the issue with certain frequencies, but then create a new problem with others.

A more effective solution would be the use of room treatments, but these require extensive materials for bass frequencies.

The other option available these days is room correction software e.g. Dirac Live or Audissey. This can be done using a pc as a source using software or by purchasing preamplifiers/amplifiers with the software built-in.

I would start with speaker placement and positioning and go from there.
 
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Paul7777x

Distinguished Member
Hello to everybody.

I have had a good look around the web and I can't seem to find a solution to my issue.

I have moved my hifi into the garage, which has been great. However, when in my seating position, the sound is lacking some warmth and bass. When I stand up there is significantly more bass, possibly a little boomy if anything. I believe this is a common complaint.

So what I'm asking is, is there a way to prevent losing the bass from my seating position to the top of the room?

Thank you very much for any help.

What is it you’re using? And if you have a photo from the listening seat that would be very helpful.
 

Helix Hifi

Well-known Member
This is something I also to degree experience-as mentioned the only way to address this issue is treating the room professionally (by you or sound expert firm) or using Dirac, Room Perfect.

Using digital room correction software can in some instances be just as expensive or cheaper then treating the room, but it is much easier using Room Perfect, Dirac.

I have not tried amplifiers which provides this, yet but hoping to do so in the future.

One easy way you can test if the problem persists is to perhaps move the sofa closer to the speakers or vice versa.

Very cheap solution is to get friend to hold glass mirror of some kind then see where the tweeter hits the side walls, then put up some acoustic panels.

This does not cost much, you can even make the panels your self.

Diffuser panels they are called. One on the left side, then right. Two acoustic absorbing panels behind the speakers, then behind the listing position.

But I am no expert in this field so maybe try and see.

I only use book shelves, thick curtains, thick rug. Clap your hands in the room, talk to your self. It shouldn’t hear like your in a cave but clearly and normally.

Place your self from the back walls then talk to your self when the voice is clear that’s where you place the speakers.

Anyway this are tips I’ve learned over the years.

Good luck.
 

hamlynrudd

Novice Member
Thank you to everybody for their input. The room is in an initial temporary state with a view to a full conversion in a couple of years. Here is a photo of my setup.

Thank you again.
 

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raptor

Well-known Member
Hi this might sound daft but looking at the space you have your set up in i think the wall's might be the problem, now years ago (like 1979) i got my first something like a goodish hifi set up still being at my parent's so doing things to my room was a bit of a no no ! but to help the sound i put egg trays all over the wall's (ok stop laughing) but it did change the sound & it was cheep to do.
 

hamlynrudd

Novice Member
Hi this might sound daft but looking at the space you have your set up in i think the wall's might be the problem, now years ago (like 1979) i got my first something like a goodish hifi set up still being at my parent's so doing things to my room was a bit of a no no ! but to help the sound i put egg trays all over the wall's (ok stop laughing) but it did change the sound & it was cheep to do.
Yes, I am thinking some treatment of sorts might help for a couple of years until the room is kitted out properly. Thanks.
 

Paul7777x

Distinguished Member
Treatment without some mathematical modelling is at best a waste of time, effort and money.

And, more often than not it is counter-productive. It makes things worse.

You could spend (literally) months with REW, a good mic, and a good few hundred quid, measuring, rearranging, measuring, rearranging, measuring, rearranging, measuring...

And it will still not be right unless you learn the correct maths, and understand the properties of absorption material, the function, construction and positioning of diffusers, just to begin with.

Lobbing foam everywhere higher and thither will not work. It’ll end up a dead sound, which would be a crying shame as it’s a useful room and some excellent hifi.

Could you let us know what amp your using? Is it a Cyrus? Looks like it might be a Cyrus CD player...
 
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hamlynrudd

Novice Member
Treatment without some mathematical modelling is at best a waste of time, effort and money.

And, more often than not it is counter-productive. It makes things worse.

You could spend (literally) months with REW, a good mic, and a good few hundred quid, measuring, rearranging, measuring, rearranging, measuring, rearranging, measuring...

And it will still not be right unless you learn the correct maths, and understand the properties of absorption material, the function, construction and positioning of diffusers, just to begin with.

Lobbing foam everywhere higher and thither will not work. It’ll end up a dead sound, which would be a crying shame as it’s a useful room and some excellent hifi.

Could you let us know what amp your using? Is it a Cyrus? Looks like it might be a Cyrus CD player...
Thank you for your help.
Indeed it is a Cyrus cd player. I am using an Arcam FMJ A29 integrated amplifier.
 

kit1cat

Active Member
I have/had similar problems with my set-up, very little bass in my listening position. I purchased a Schiit Loki which allowed me to boost the bass and tame a bright treble.

Latest version Schiit Loki Mini+
 

dogfonos

Well-known Member
So what I'm asking is, is there a way to prevent losing the bass from my seating position to the top of the room?

Physical room treatments can help with some acoustic problems but I doubt they would do anything to correct a lack of bass in the seating position. And yes, it's not an uncommon problem.

Some form of DSP room correction may work (I have no experience of this) but you could run out of amp headroom/ speaker power handling if bass needs boosting a lot. Moving speakers and/or listening position is likely to be the answer. Daft suggestion: how about raising the sofa above floor level on some sort of platform?

If the garage is larger than the room the system was previously in, you will likely get a lighter tonal balance anyway. Maybe give it a few weeks for your ears to acclimatize to the new tonal balance before making a decision.
 

Spick72

Active Member
My home theatre/hifi is also in my converted garage and I have issues with the bass. The room is long and narrow as yours seems to be. I have tried one sub then 2 subs then REW measurements and lots of research. The outcome of all that is a standard U.K. single garage will have a big bass null in the 40-50 hz region from about 4ft-6ft from the front wall. If I stand at the front or back of the space bass is full but towards this zone it is lighter.

Not a lot can be done as area is too small for bass traps. Room correction helped (in my case auddessy XT32) the only plus is good bass all the way down to 20hz with the door shut!
 

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