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Normal or High Contrast Screen?

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by jrosado, May 4, 2005.

  1. jrosado

    jrosado
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    Hi:

    I'm on the beginning of bulding my home teather. I will be using a Panasonic AE700 screen. However, since my room it's nor very big, i'm limited to this values:

    Throw Distance: 2.9 m (9 feet and 6 inches)
    Screen size: 66" by 37" (76" of diagonal)
    Zoom of the projector: 1.6x
    Screen gain: 1.0

    with this values, taken from www.projectorcentral.com calculator, i get a warning:

    Recommend lower Brightness (Increase image size).

    I'm mounting this in a room were i don't have total control of light and there can be situations were i can have some light in the room, so a bigger brightens is good for me. Also, i don't want a bigger image because this will make me use more zoom and will degrade image. I've narrowed my screen choices to a projecta screen (http://www.projecta.nl/pages/details.php?taalCode=UK&subgroep=&rID=64&productID=190), since this models (16:9) give me a big black border in top, which makes them ideal to hang them on the ceiling.

    Now, my dilemma is to choose between the normal model (10200044) which is withe or the high contrast model (10200052), so i can improve contrast since my brightness is high.

    Wich one do you guys recommend? Can the high contrast model provide me a good image with good colors?

    Regards,

    J. Rosado
     
  2. pez

    pez
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  3. jrosado

    jrosado
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    Hi think that's a little high to my budget :suicide: $2000 is more that the cost of the projector :eek:
     
  4. Gary Lightfoot

    Gary Lightfoot
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    There are a few things you could try here.

    The genuine lumens are normaly lower than rated - sometimes by as much as 40%, so you won't be getting as much brightness as PJCentral probably think - if it's 800 lumens in a low lamp mode, then you'll be getting 47ft lamberts (aim is 12 to 16), and that will dim over time - still very high though.

    If the lumens are actually lower than advertised, lets say 20% less, then you will be getting 38ft lamberts. You could fit an ND2 filter (Hoya are best) to the lens and half the lumen output, then as the lamp dims with age, you can remove it again to get some brightness back if necessary. This will always keep you closer to 'cinema' levels of refelected light and you can remove it at any time - especialy if you have ambient light in the room.

    If you are going to have some light in the room, then a grey screen is useful for giving you a better bass black level to help negate the effects the ambient light, as well as improving the perceived contrast. The grey screen will also improve the black level anyway, which is usefull, especialy with a bright projector as in this case. Not everyone likes grey screens so it might be useful to try and get a demo. Both the white and grey screen have a gain of unity, so there's no other advantages there.

    With a screen of your size and the possibility of light in the room, combined with the LCDs normaly greyish black level, I would thinnk a grey screen and a removable Hoya ND2 (or even ND4) filter will give you lumens nearer to cinema levels, plus you have the ability to remove it at any time if the situation arises.

    Gary.
     

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